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Effective Means for: 1) Inter-disciplinary Communications and/or 2) Transferring Knowledge to the Society at Large (Participative Panel)
Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Dr. Karl H. Müller, Director ofThe Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics, Vienna, Austria / Professor at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
The main purpose of this Conversational Participative Session is to support an open forum for the identifications of the more effective means for 1) Inter-Disciplinary Communications and/or 2) Transferring Knowledge to the Society at large. Among the expected outcomes of this session are the following:

•   To identify feasible and effective ways that might be implemented 1) in future conferences organized by the International Institute of Informatics and Systemics, 2) by the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics in its both versions: English (JSCI) and Spanish (RISCI), and potentially by other journals and conferences.

•   To provide input to the attendees of this sessions so they feel enabled to write reflection-based invited or position papers, which will be included in the post-conference edition of the conference proceedings with no additional costs for the respective authors. The best of these papers will also be published in the Journal with no additional cost for the respective author. These papers will be distinguished as “invited papers” or “position papers.
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Building Working Communities: Exploration, Collaboration and Creativity (Workshop) - Part 1 of 2
Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA
Dr. Susu Nousala, Researcher in Sustainable Design, Aalto University, Finland, and Research Fellow at the (Australasian Centre for the Governance and Management of Urban Transport) Faculty of Architecture- Buildi


Abstract
Work in complex domains with diverse stakeholders requires more than knowledge and expertise learned from lectures, case studies or even projects. Openness, teamwork and spontaneity are needed to allow community building and effective collaboration, and to take advantage of serendipitous emergent connections. Through a series of exercises, discussions and thought experiments, we explore building blocks and provide an entry point for a road map for creating tomorrow’s professionals and communities of knowledge, learning and practice.

For those with background in these techniques, we will suggest new domains of applicability and viewpoints. For novices in this area, we provide guidelines for including this approach to being open to spontaneity, community formation and emergence.
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Building Working Communities: Exploration, Collaboration and Creativity (Workshop) - Part 2 of 2
Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA
Dr. Susu Nousala, Researcher in Sustainable Design, Aalto University, Finland, and Research Fellow at the (Australasian Centre for the Governance and Management of Urban Transport) Faculty of Architecture- Buildi


Abstract
Work in complex domains with diverse stakeholders requires more than knowledge and expertise learned from lectures, case studies or even projects. Openness, teamwork and spontaneity are needed to allow community building and effective collaboration, and to take advantage of serendipitous emergent connections. Through a series of exercises, discussions and thought experiments, we explore building blocks and provide an entry point for a road map for creating tomorrow’s professionals and communities of knowledge, learning and practice.

For those with background in these techniques, we will suggest new domains of applicability and viewpoints. For novices in this area, we provide guidelines for including this approach to being open to spontaneity, community formation and emergence.
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Academic Ethos, Pathos, and Logos (Participative Panel)
Co-Chairs and Co-Facilitators: Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA, and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and systemic, USA, and Former Dean of Research and Development of the Simon Bolivar University, Venezuela

Abstract
The main purpose of this Conversational Participative Session is to support an open forum

1.  To describe the importance of integration Ethos, Pathos, Logos to Academic Activities: Research, Education, and Consulting of Real Life Problem Solving.

2.  To identify effective and feasible means to achieve this integration in academic activities.

3.  To identify effective and feasible means to synergistically relate academic activities to the Private and Public Sector as well as to Society at large.

4.  To identify feasible and effective ways, of point 2 and 3 above, that might be implemented 1) in future conferences organized by the International Institute of Informatics and Systemics, 2) by the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics in its both versions: English (JSCI) and Spanish (RISCI), and potentially by other journals and conferences.

5.  To provide input to the attendees of this session so they feel enabled to write reflection-based invited or position papers, which will be included in the post-conference edition of the conference proceedings with no additional costs for the respective authors. The best of these papers will also be published in the Journal with no additional cost for the respective author. These papers will be distinguished as “invited papers” or “position papers”.
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Casting a Wide Net for Innovation: Bringing Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Real World Solutions
Dr. Robert Cherinka, Senior Principal Information Systems Engineer, MITRE Corporation, USA
Eng. Joseph Prezzama, Associate Department Head, Tampa Operations, MITRE Corporation, USA


Abstract
Federal agencies are seeking new ways to innovate, procure and enhance enterprise capabilities.  In this presentation, we will be discussing the utility of bringing interdisciplinary collaboration to real world problems.  Modern organizations are facing similar diverse challenges every day.  They are coping by: Their Leaders setting sound strategic visions; utilizing Infrastructures and test-beds for information sharing, experimentation & prototyping; embracing interdisciplinary sources that are open to the communities (such as government agencies, academia, SMEs & industry; and by partnering, teaming and integrating with industry & academia.  The goal is to have a rich set of innovative interdisciplinary resources at our disposal to utilize, tap into, and to meet our goals.  This could result in diverse partnering and teaming arrangements and for creating new ways of thinking, thinking about: collaboration, innovation, teaming, competition, open communication and transparency.  Competitions are one tool that federal agencies can use to drive innovation and solve mission-centric problems—whether technical, scientific, or creative.  In this presentation we will examine several approaches to foster open innovation through challenges and competitions in support of key business operations in the workforce.  We highlight specific examples of their use in “real world” environments and provide an assessment of applicability, benefits and challenges for implementation in large organizations.
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The Smarter Planet: Built on Informatics and Cybernetics
Dr. Fred Maymir-Ducharme, Executive Consultant Architect, IBM Federal CTO Office, USA

Abstract
IBM’s “Smarter Planet Initiative” is an excellent example of applied Informatics and Cybernetics. The initiative originated from “Autonomic Computing,” which integrated the traditionally silo’ed management of computer servers, storage, networks, and other systems elements into a more holistic view of the enterprise – enabling more intelligent decisions and automation. As the world becomes more and more instrumented, the ability to access and process vast amounts of inter-related data has enabled novel capabilities: managing large complex buildings, state-wide infrastructure, city-wide services, and so on.  This presentation will focus on the Informatics and Cybernetics behind the evolving Smarter Planet wave.
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Anticipating Serendipity
Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA

Abstract
Spontaneity, creativity, community building, alertness for emergent properties and serendipitous events, and openness to evolution and change are crucial for collaboration and in interdisciplinary and reflective disciplines. While one can’t teach these dispositions and abilities, one can strive to prepare ourselves and others.
 
Preparation must aim not only to develop a base of knowledge and judgment, but also to inculcate habits of mind and multiple perspectives that lend themselves both to discovery and to collaboration. In this keynote, I survey aspects, perspectives and ingredients for success, as well as the breadth of both learning opportunities and applications that can benefit from spontaneity-friendly individuals and communities.
 
This keynote intertwines with both my EISTA presentation on improvisation, and the earlier workshop on Building Working Communities, co-presented with Susu Nousala.
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Knowledge Integration and Inter-Disciplinary Communication in Action Research
Dr. Heidi Ann Hahn, Director of the Engineering Capability Development, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA / Past President of the International Council of Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Enchantment Chapter

Abstract
In a plenary talk at WMSCI 2012 entitled “Planning for Action Research: Looking at Practice through a Different Lens,” I asserted that behavioral science practitioners, including myself, often “back into” Action Research – we start out doing a process improvement or intervention and discover something along the way, i.e., generalizable knowledge, which seems worthwhile to share with our community of practice. I further asserted that, had we conceived of our efforts as research from the outset, our contributions to the body of knowledge would be more robust and the utility of our projects would improve as well.
 
This talk continues on that theme. I will briefly review the comparison of action research and process improvement methods offered previously, then use a comparison of two Los Alamos National Laboratory engineering ethics training projects – one developed using a process improvement framework, the other using an action research framework – to provide evidence that use of a research “lens” can enhance behavioral science interventions and the knowledge that may result from them. The linkage between the Specifying Learning and Diagnosing stages of the Action Research cycle provides one mechanism for integrating the knowledge gained into the product or process being studied and should provide a reinforcing loop that leads to continual improvement.
 
The literature suggests that the collaborative relationships among researchers and the individual, group, or organization that is the subject of the improvement opportunity (the “client”), who are likely from very different backgrounds, and the interpretive epistemology that are among the hallmarks of Action Research also contribute to the quality of the knowledge gained. This concept will also be explored in this talk.
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Big Data: Strategies and Synergies
Dr. Melinda Connor, Langara College- Vancouver Canada / Akamai University in Hilo Hawaii / Science Advisor for the Spirituals for the 21st Century Project, California State University Dominguez Hills, USA / Former Director, Optimal Healing Research, University of Arizona, USA

Abstract
What good is being a “data pack-rat” unless you can utilize the terabytes per hour that you are receiving? What is the most effective management of this “big data”? How long do you keep the raw data? And what data will you dump? What about the limitations of the hardware of the various platforms and the network structure itself? What are the most effective ways of data-mining and understanding the ecological landscape of the data you are receiving? How do you determine new corporate strategic direction based on the data when the shape of the data itself is not clear? What about cross platform portability of the final product? These and other questions will be explored with suggestions for overall management and potential solutions.
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Research and Applications in Global Supercomputing: An Interdisciplinary Science
Professor Richard Segall, Computer Information Technology, Arkansas State University, USA

Abstract
This talk will summarize research of Dr. Segall that pertains to an overview of the use of supercomputers around the world for multi-disciplines ranging from computational biology to data enabled social sciences.  Supercomputing is a contemporary solution to enhance the speed of calculations in nanoseconds.

A supercomputer is a computer at the frontlines of current processing capacity and speed of calculations. First introduced in the 1960s, the supercomputers of the 1970s used only few processors, and in the 1990s machines with thousands of processors began to appear. By the end of the 20th century supercomputers were massively parallel computing systems composed of tens of thousands of processors. In contrast, supercomputers of the 21st century can use over 100,000 processors including those with graphic capabilities.
 
Supercomputers are used today for highly-intensive calculation tasks for projects such as quantum physics, weather forecasting, molecular modeling, and physical simulations. Supercomputers can be used for simulations of airplanes in wind tunnels, detonations of nuclear weapons, splitting electrons, and helping researchers study how drugs combat the swine flu virus.
 
This talk will discuss applications and current challenges of supercomputing across multiple domains of computational science including bioinformatics, nuclear power, renewable energy, and also include topics such as programming paradigms in high performance computing, steganography, encoding as inverse data mining, cloud computing, the leadership needed for supercomputer administration, and the philosophical logic entailed.
 
Tianhe-2, a supercomputer developed by China’s National University of Defense Technology, is as of November 2013 the world’s new No. 1 system (Top500, 2013) with a performance of 33.86 petaflops on the Linpack benchmark, according to the 42nd edition of the twice-yearly TOP500 list of the world’s most powerful supercomputers. The list was announced November 18, 2013 during the opening session of the 2013 Supercomputing Conference (SC13) in Denver, Colorado USA.
 
The Indian government has stated that it has committed about $940 million to develop what could become the world’s fastest supercomputer by 2017, one that would have a performance of 1 exaflop which is about 61 times faster than today’s fastest computers. [http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2012-09-17/hardware/33901529_1_first-supercomputers-petaflop-fastest-supercomputer].
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Cross-Cultural Communication Training for Students in Multidisciplinary Research Area of Biomedical Engineering
Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Doctor of Engineering and Doctor of Medicine, Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan

Abstract
“Biomedical Engineering” makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others.  Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop “ Biomedical Engineering”.  Communication is not easy in a multidisciplinary research area, because each area has its own background of thinking.  Because each nation has its own background of culture, on the other hand, international communication is not easy, either.  A cross-cultural student program has been designed for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area.  Students from a variety of backgrounds of research area and culture have joined in the program: mechanical engineering, material science, environmental engineering, science of nursing, dentist, pharmacy, electronics, and so on.  The program works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary research area of biomedical engineering. Foreign language and digital data give students chance to study several things: how to make communication precisely, how to quote previous data. The experience in the program helps students not only understand new idea in the laboratory visit, but also make a presentation in the international research conference. The program relates to author’s several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross-cultural student camp, multi PhD theses, various affiliations, and the creation of the interdisciplinary department.
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Cognitive Sciences Applications in Big Data
Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Visiting Scholar, Harvard University, USA / The Air Force Research Laboratory, Principal Research Physicist

Abstract
Big Data problems have been efficiently addressed with cognitive algorithms modeling mechanisms of the mind. The talk describes cognitive algorithms, their applications to various engineering problems, including Big Data, and their foundations in mathematical models of the mind including higher cognitive abilities. Mechanisms of the mind include concepts, emotions, hierarchy, dynamic logic, and interaction between language and cognition. Big Data analytics requires algorithms modeling all these abilities. Machine learning, artificial intelligence, and modeling of the mind has been plagued by computational complexity since the 1960s. Dynamic logic overcomes computational complexity when analyzing Big Data. It is a process-logic, which replaces classical logic; it serves as a basis for cognitive algorithms and for a mathematical theory of learning, combining the mechanisms of the mind into a hierarchical system of mental processes. Each process proceeds "from vague to crisp," from vague representation-concepts to crisp ones. Brain imaging experiments (Bar et al 2006; Kveraga et al 2007) confirmed this as an adequate model of the brain perception and cognition.
 
Computational difficulty is related to Gödelian problems in logic: computational complexity is a manifestation of Gödelian incompleteness in finite systems, such as computers or brains. The mind is "not logical." Dynamic logic overcomes this difficulty. Engineering applications demonstrate orders of magnitude improvement in Big Data analytics, data mining, information integration, financial predictions, genetic studies, cybersecurity.
 
The talk presents the dual hierarchy model of interactions between language and cognition. It enables integrating language, text, and sensor data. A number of "mysteries" in this interaction are explained: what is the difference between them; what is the role of language in cognition, why children can talk before they really understand, how much adults are different from children in this respect, etc. These are explained in the model, and explanations are confirmed in brain imaging experiments (Binder et al 2005; Price 2012). Much difficulties in developing Big Data algorithms are related to confusing language and cognition.
 
The knowledge instinct drives acquisition of cognitive ability and is a foundation of all our higher cognitive abilities. Its satisfaction is experienced as aesthetic emotions (experimentally confirmed in Cabanac et al 2010). Efficient engineering algorithms must model these emotional abilities (Perlovsky, Deming, Ilin, 2011). The hierarchy of aesthetic emotions is discussed from understanding of everyday objects, to understanding of abstract concepts throughout the hierarchy, to the near top of the mental hierarchy. Contents of these "highest" concepts are discussed and the corresponding aesthetic emotions are related to the beautiful. Experimental tests of this conjecture are for the near future.
 
Contradictions among knowledge are experienced as negative aesthetic emotions, cognitive dissonance. Development of robots and human-computer interactions require algorithms modeling this ability. Cognitive dissonance counteracts the knowledge instinct and would prevent accumulation of knowledge and the entire human evolution, if not a special ability evolved for overcoming these emotions. It follows from the dual hierarchy model that this mechanism is music. This theoretical prediction has been experimentally confirmed (Masataka et al 2012, 2013, Cabanac et al, 2013). This explains the origin and evolution of music, what Darwin called the greatest mystery.
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Realizing a Disciplinary Field from an Interdisciplinary Approach or an Interdisciplinary Field from Disciplines
Dr. Matthew E. Edwards, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics, Former Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, Alabama A&M University, USA

Abstract
To be an interdisciplinarian is to be focused learned with a "synergetic connection" that has convolved between two or more established disciplines. Secondly, to be a multidisciplinarian is to be knowledgeable in two or more disciplines without such a "synergetic connection" between them. Thirdly, to be a disciplinarian is to be focused learned and enamored with vast information and understanding in a single field of study, which indicates the ability to investigate new concepts, solve problems, or make products. This same ability: to investigate new concepts, solve problems, and make products emanates from the interdisciplinarian career-path alliances, as well, but far less so from that of multidisciplinarian ones. Each of these career-path alliances (also referred to as paradigms of inquiry and intellectual demands) can be engaged for scholarly activities on one hand for some individuals, or for practicing/professional activities of some other individuals on the other hand. How to achieve a career-path alliance and sustain the same is an interesting contemplation. To that extent, I review these career-path alliances and illustrate selected structures that illumine timeline-paths to achieve them. Also, I denote how to maintain each career-path alliance, once achieved, and how to diverge from one to another, while still maintaining a scholarly demeanor or a practitioner’s behavior after either has been achieved.
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New Cybernetics: An Emerging Post-Disciplinary Field
Dr. Karl H. Müller, Director ofThe Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics, Vienna, Austria / Professor at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract
Under the heading of new cybernetics the lecture will present a new approach to cybernetics which differs wildly from old cybernetics as it was developed between the 1940s and the 1960s or even second-order cybernetics as an observer-dependent form of doing science differently. The lecture will focus on three inter-related Copernican revolutions or inversions which become the differentia specifica of new cybernetics.
 
The first inversion for new cybernetics lies in the domain or in the level of analysis which is introduced as second-order domain or level. This second-order domain is reached whenever re-entry operations on normal or first-order science building blocks are undertaken: These re-entry operations can be performed with outputs from first-order science like in tests of tests, causal relations of causal relations, explanations of explanations, etc. or with inputs of first-order science like in theories of theories, models of models, generative mechanisms of generative mechanisms, etc.
 
For the second inversion a separation between exo-science – science from without – and endo-science – science from within - can be developed. It can be shown that Science I was predominantly organized as exo-science whereas a drift is currently underway towards various forms of endo-science. Endo-science places the observer as participant player within the domain under investigation and creates, thus, an endo-sphere or an endo-field which differs significantly from the traditional exo-spheres.
 
Finally, the lecture will briefly discuss the new target values associated with the two previous Copernican inversions. It will be shown that objectivity and inter-subjectivity – the two target values for Science I – can and must be substituted by intersubjective reproducibility as new target value. Intersubjective reproducibility becomes the consequence of doing science from within and from the active role of observers as explicit of research processes.
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Vehicle Ad hock Networks and Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems: Multidisciplinary Projects and their Impact in Society
Professor Tomas Zelinka, Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Transportation Sciences, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic.

Abstract
Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS) strategy is accepted as new phenomena in transportations systems. C-ITS services as typical multi-disciplinary projects available now or expected to come soon are introduced. Example of such service implementation dedicated for airport terrestrial transport system support is presented as example of successful C-ITS project. Communication solution based on VANET (Vehicle Ad hock NETwork) architecture is analyzed and specific requirements on communications solution performance parameters are discussed. Finally realistic potential of available C-ITS services and their potential impact on society are discussed.
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High Impact Practices: Andragogy and Higher Education Teaching, Learning and Students Experiences
Dr. Christopher N. Amos Sr., Department of Teacher Education and Educational Leadership, The University of West Florida, USA

Abstract
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A Discipline Independent Approach to a Higher Cognitive
Dr. Russell Jay Hendel, Department of Mathematics, Towson University, USA

Abstract
Following the cybernetic approach of Ashby, who advocated replacing "higher order" concepts with mechanistic definitions, we present mechanistic approaches to higher cognitive pedagogy that are content independent, depending exclusively on information flow. "Higher cognitive" is identified with executive function, more specifically, the continual multi-dimensional processing of information. Pedagogy is defined as facilitating multi-dimensional processing on a base of atomic skill competencies. Even skill performance, when coupled with executive function is higher order. Mathematics, writing and foreign-language course interpretations are presented and applications to exercise construction are explored.
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Fostering Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Improve Student Learning
Professor Ronald A. Styron, Jr., Professor of Educational Leadership, Director of the Quality Enhancement Plan, University of South Alabama, USA
Dr. Jennifer Styron, College of Nursing, University of South Alabama. USA / Former Research Specialist and Distance Education Coordinator at The University of Southern Mississippi, USA


Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the impact on student learning of those enrolled in courses where instructors participated in collegial coaching and peer mentoring. A nonequivalent group design methodology was employed along with an analysis of variance to analyze data. Findings indicated higher mastery levels of student learning outcomes, higher levels of perceived critical thinking and collaboration by students, statistical significance in critical thinking constructs, higher levels of persistence, and more A’s and B’s and fewer D’s and F’s in courses where faculty members were mentored as compared to courses where faculty members were not.
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Academic Globalization: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
Dr. Marta Szabo White, Director of the Study Abroad in Transition Economies, Director of Business Learning Community, Director of the Program Business Mediterranean Style, Georgia State University, USA

Abstract
Pedagogy that enables discovery and dissemination; inspires epic research and seminal scholarship of teaching; and is epitomized through ethos, pathos, and logos in the context of Academic Globalization, is what many would deem to be a higher collaborative pedagogy. The intersection of a Hungarian Rhapsody, which is beautifully sad and the Greek Parthenon, which structurally represents thought beyond borders, underscore character (ethos), emotions (pathos), and logic (logos). This paper explores leveraging these three pivotal constructs by extending an established communication framework to facilitate inter-disciplinary language and communication.
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Risk and the Network Effect: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach
Professor Mario Norbis, School of Business, Quinnipiac University, USA

Abstract
The effects of network relationships on risk transmission have been explored and analyzed for some time. Examples of it are found in such diverse areas as banking, legal, health and social networks among others. Their analysis imposes a multidisciplinary approach that includes areas from probability and economics to behavioral.  Not surprisingly, many of these connections can be described as “chains” of some type. While many of these examples emphasize how risk is transmitted through the network affecting others; others focus on how social networks can be used to minimize the effect of risk. In this presentation we share ideas to characterize and schemes to quantify the network effect on risk with the expectation to promote a discussion about it.
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The Generation of Inter Disciplinary Research and Education by Combining Art and Design and Engineering Design
Associate Professor Adream Blair-Early, College of Design, Architecture, Art and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin, USA

Abstract
Our next generation of designers and makers face major challenges as they complete their education and enter the technical job market. While a high value is placed on innovation and entrepreneurship in the marketplace, the preparation students receive does not always provide them with the intellectual framework, the range of skills, the flexibility, the hands-on experiences or the leadership opportunities they will need to function as creative thinkers and versatile problem solvers in the global collaborative work environments of the 21st century. Herein lies the underlying theme of this talk: lessons and ideas from participatory and interdisciplinary teaching and learning spaces that empower the students and users.