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Effective Means for 1) Inter Disciplinary Communications and/or 2) Transferring Knowledge to the Society at Large (Conversational Participatory Session)
Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, CEI of LP Information Technology, Northeastern University, USA / Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University Harvard University, and Principal Research Physicist at The Air Force Research Laboratory, and Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education.

Abstract
The main purpose of this Conversational Participative Session is to support an open forum for the identifications of the more effective means for 1) Inter-Disciplinary Communications and/or 2) Transferring Knowledge to the Society at large. Among the expected outcomes of this session are the following:

1.  To identify feasible and effective ways that might be implemented 1) in future conferences organized by the International  Institute of Informatics and Systemics, 2) by the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics in its both versions: English (JSCI) and Spanish (RISCI), and potentially by other journals and conferences.

2.  To provide input to the attendees of this sessions so they feel enabled to write reflection-based invited or position papers, which, if accepted, will be included in the post-conference edition of the conference proceedings, as invited papers, with no additional costs for the respective authors. The best ones of these papers will also be published in the Journal, also as invited papers, with no additional cost for the respective author. The authors can refer to these papers “reflection paper” or “position paper”. In any case these papers should be reduced to abstract and should be related to the content of the conversations of the respective session.
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How the Inventor Fares from a Systems Perspective in order to transform an invention into an Innovation (Conversational Participatory Workshop)
Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA

Abstract
A person with an ostensibly new idea must encounter a highly complex patenting process in being recognized as the originator of that idea. From a systems perspective, s/he enters the patenting system as the "carrier" of a package in an environment, and the carrier with the idea must at least be homeostatic but preferably having the capacity to adapt. The initial creation may be deemed an invention, but its transformation or adaption to the system environment results in an innovation, as evidenced by how useful it is. While that evidence of utility is displayed concretely in the economic arena, as in marketing, it also certified as such by achieving patentability. Even a creator as innovator faces the challenges of adaptation by further modifying the innovation to result in further innovation, a dynamic and ongoing regulatory process, a feedback loop. As somewhat of a sidebar, a curious element/meta-element relationship emerges, with the innovation being regarded as an invention when it is transformed further to result in a new innovation, this "meta" relationship being typically characteristic of feedback loops. To appreciate the creator's world from this regulatory, or cybernetic, systems perspective, I set forth definitions of elements to be found within the inventor/innovation world. Here, common terms one encounters in that world are identified and related to each other: inventor, innovator, and intellectual property, among others. A description of the invention/innovation cycle then is described, with an initial focus on how the foregoing terms assume their status. The relating of the terms unfolds as a broader consideration of the invention/innovation cycle, i.e., how the ensemble of a creation (a product of the mind) as a form of informatics fares as an adaptive system.
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Research and Consulting (Conversational Participatory Session)
Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education, and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Some academic areas necessarily require consulting activities or other related practicing experience, especially if that research leads to development. For example, what would be the “lab” (as an instrument of development) for a professor of information systems development methodologies if not information systems development in the real world? In some other academic fields, consulting activities might enrich, support and enhance research as it might be the case of some engineering fields, law, medicine, managements science, operation research, etc. Still, in other academic fields consulting is perceived as a distracting activity from what is considered to be a scholarly research. In some fields or disciplines this might be true, but even in these cases, scholarly research would eventually generate, via other scholars or researchers, applied research which would support real life problem solving and, consequently, decision and policy making processes which form part of the consulting activities.  It is well known that research activities in many academic departments go on because of grant monies received to development. Consequently, in such cases, to cybernetically relate research and consulting might produce the desired development (see figure below).
 
Research*, development and consulting** are, directly or indirectly, immediately or mediately, related and complementing each other via cybernetic co-regulative loops (negative feedback or feedforward) and co-amplificatory loops (positive feedback) which, in turn, might potentially produce synergic effects that a) increase the effectiveness (and possibly the efficiency) of both kinds of activities, and/or b) generate systems/products development, innovations, entrepreneurship, patents, research papers, etc. On the other hand, this kind of systemic-cybernetic relationships between research and consulting provides the type of experience required to be combined with the knowledge transmission for a real education which should not be reduced to mere instruction.  Within professional careers is where this kind of experience is mostly needed in an authentic education.

* We are referring to financially supported research (via grants, salaries, etc.) and non-financially supported ones.
** We are referring to for-benefit, not-for-profit, and pro bono consulting activities.
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E-Learning and E-Consulting: Negotiating, Managing, Developing and Delivering “E” Solutions
Dr. Risa Blair, Kaplan University, United States

Abstract
This talk will offer lessons learned from the field and promote lively discussion.  The range of topics will be from E-Learning to E-Consulting, and the unique challenges of dealing in these arenas.  The focus will be on the special challenges of working in the “E” dimension.  The scope of the sessions will cover challenging cases and best practices for success.
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Higher Education or Higher Instruction? (Conversational Participatory Panel) - Part 1 of 2
Panelists: Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, CEI of LP Information Technology, Northeastern University, USA / Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University Harvard University, and Principal Research Physicist at The Air Force Research Laboratory; Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education; Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA; Dr. Risa Blair, Kaplan University, United States; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
“Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school.” Albert Einstein [1]
 
“But education, in the true sense, is not mere instruction…It is unfolding the whole human nature. It is growing up in all things to our highest possibility” J. F. Clarke [2]
 
“By education I mean an all-round drawing out of the best in child and man-body, mind and spirit. Literacy is not the end of education or even the beginning.” Mahatma Gandhi [3]
 
The purpose of conversational is to differentiate between the notions of Education and Instruction, especially in the context of Higher Education, and to identify the kind of relationships that would make more effective the implementation of both of them.
 
To confuse the meanings of these terms or what concepts and uses are involved in their respective notions might be the source of intellectual confusion, unintentional misleading, and, hence, of pragmatic ineffectiveness, especially with regards to educational processes. Our hope is to continue reflecting and researching on this issue and, potentially, generate reflections and research from teachers and professors specifically regarding what is (and/or what should be) the meaning of Higher Education, and its differences with what we might call Higher Instruction. An increasing number of scholars (consciously or unconsciously) perceive or conceive some universities as institutions of Higher Instruction rather than Higher Education.
 
In the opinion of some of the panelist, there is an increasing confusion among the terms of “education” and “instruction” and sometimes they are used almost as synonyms. Both terms are much related, but they do not mean the same ideas or concepts. Let us the metaphor of “color” and “surface”, we know that both are completely different concepts though very related to each other. There is no color that is not seen on a surface and no empirical surface with no color on it, but to confuse the notions of “color” and “surface” might take us to a non-sense confusion between “Optics” with Geometry”. “Color” and “surface” should be differentiated as concepts or notions in order to understand the reality in which both of them co-exist together. [4]
 
To do so, we will not try to conceptually define “education” and “instruction.” This is not the place to do it, nor is it our intention. Furthermore, from a systemic perspective, as well as from a post-modernist stand, definition of education should be done in the context of a culture and/or value system. Consequently, the definition should be done by the users of specific educational systems and processes. This is why we worked out in another article a meta-definition of “Education,” i.e. we defined a way of producing a definition of education by means of the corresponding users (students, parents, teachers, etc). Our purpose in this conversational session is 1) to share and collect important denotations and connotations of the notions of “Education” and “Instruction” with the objective to differentiate them in order to effectively relate them; and 2) to provide the attendees with the option to write, after the conference is over, an invited position of reflection paper which, if accepted, will be included in the post-conference volume of the conference proceedings with no additional cost for the respective author(s). Best papers will be selected for their publication in the journal with no additional cost either for their author(s).


[1] Several authors can be cited reiterating in similar words this quote (e.g. B. F. Skinner, E. D. Battle, Edouard Herriot, C. F. Thwing, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Agnes F. Perkins, James Bryant Conant, Evan Esar, E. F. L. Wood, George Savile, Lord Halifax, Alan Bennett, etc)< Albert Einstein attribute to an unidentified “wit”. The complete citation from Einstein is the following: “If a young man has trained his muscles and physical endurance by gymnastics and walking, he will later be fitted for every physical work. This is also analogous to the training of the mind and the exercising of the mental and manual skill. Thus the wit was not wrong who defined education in this way: “Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school.” Albert Einstein, 1936, 1956, p. 36 in the 1984 edition.
[2] Clarke,  J. F. (1810-1888), 2013 edition, p. 36
[3] Mahatma Mohan Karamchand Gandhi, Harijan: July 31, 1937,
[4] It has been reported that this metaphor (color, surface) was used by Aristotle in order to present the same reasoning we are providing with it, but we could not find in Aristotle any use of this metaphor to refer to the necessity of analytical thinking in order to understand t the respective reality. We are not meaning that it is not an Aristotelian metaphor, but that we cannot make any reference regarding this use of the relationship between color and surface.. But, Aristotle did treat at length the relationships between “color” and “surface.” He explicitly affirms that “it is a property of a surface to be the primary thing that is coloured, has used in addition something perceptible, being coloured, but something which evidently always belongs<, and the property of a surface will in this respect have been correctly rendered.” 131b33-7; Oxford Translation, 1993, p. 222 (italics and emphasis added).
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Higher Education or Higher Instruction? (Conversational Participatory Panel) - Part 2 of 2
Panelists: Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, CEI of LP Information Technology, Northeastern University, USA / Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University Harvard University, and Principal Research Physicist at The Air Force Research Laboratory; Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education; Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA; Dr. Risa Blair, Kaplan University, United States; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
“Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school.” Albert Einstein [1]
 
“But education, in the true sense, is not mere instruction…It is unfolding the whole human nature. It is growing up in all things to our highest possibility” J. F. Clarke [2]
 
“By education I mean an all-round drawing out of the best in child and man-body, mind and spirit. Literacy is not the end of education or even the beginning.” Mahatma Gandhi [3]
 
The purpose of conversational is to differentiate between the notions of Education and Instruction, especially in the context of Higher Education, and to identify the kind of relationships that would make more effective the implementation of both of them.
 
To confuse the meanings of these terms or what concepts and uses are involved in their respective notions might be the source of intellectual confusion, unintentional misleading, and, hence, of pragmatic ineffectiveness, especially with regards to educational processes. Our hope is to continue reflecting and researching on this issue and, potentially, generate reflections and research from teachers and professors specifically regarding what is (and/or what should be) the meaning of Higher Education, and its differences with what we might call Higher Instruction. An increasing number of scholars (consciously or unconsciously) perceive or conceive some universities as institutions of Higher Instruction rather than Higher Education.
 
In the opinion of some of the panelist, there is an increasing confusion among the terms of “education” and “instruction” and sometimes they are used almost as synonyms. Both terms are much related, but they do not mean the same ideas or concepts. Let us the metaphor of “color” and “surface”, we know that both are completely different concepts though very related to each other. There is no color that is not seen on a surface and no empirical surface with no color on it, but to confuse the notions of “color” and “surface” might take us to a non-sense confusion between “Optics” with Geometry”. “Color” and “surface” should be differentiated as concepts or notions in order to understand the reality in which both of them co-exist together. [4]
 
To do so, we will not try to conceptually define “education” and “instruction.” This is not the place to do it, nor is it our intention. Furthermore, from a systemic perspective, as well as from a post-modernist stand, definition of education should be done in the context of a culture and/or value system. Consequently, the definition should be done by the users of specific educational systems and processes. This is why we worked out in another article a meta-definition of “Education,” i.e. we defined a way of producing a definition of education by means of the corresponding users (students, parents, teachers, etc). Our purpose in this conversational session is 1) to share and collect important denotations and connotations of the notions of “Education” and “Instruction” with the objective to differentiate them in order to effectively relate them; and 2) to provide the attendees with the option to write, after the conference is over, an invited position of reflection paper which, if accepted, will be included in the post-conference volume of the conference proceedings with no additional cost for the respective author(s). Best papers will be selected for their publication in the journal with no additional cost either for their author(s).


[1] Several authors can be cited reiterating in similar words this quote (e.g. B. F. Skinner, E. D. Battle, Edouard Herriot, C. F. Thwing, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Agnes F. Perkins, James Bryant Conant, Evan Esar, E. F. L. Wood, George Savile, Lord Halifax, Alan Bennett, etc)< Albert Einstein attribute to an unidentified “wit”. The complete citation from Einstein is the following: “If a young man has trained his muscles and physical endurance by gymnastics and walking, he will later be fitted for every physical work. This is also analogous to the training of the mind and the exercising of the mental and manual skill. Thus the wit was not wrong who defined education in this way: “Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school.” Albert Einstein, 1936, 1956, p. 36 in the 1984 edition.
[2] Clarke,  J. F. (1810-1888), 2013 edition, p. 36
[3] Mahatma Mohan Karamchand Gandhi, Harijan: July 31, 1937,
[4] It has been reported that this metaphor (color, surface) was used by Aristotle in order to present the same reasoning we are providing with it, but we could not find in Aristotle any use of this metaphor to refer to the necessity of analytical thinking in order to understand t the respective reality. We are not meaning that it is not an Aristotelian metaphor, but that we cannot make any reference regarding this use of the relationship between color and surface.. But, Aristotle did treat at length the relationships between “color” and “surface.” He explicitly affirms that “it is a property of a surface to be the primary thing that is coloured, has used in addition something perceptible, being coloured, but something which evidently always belongs<, and the property of a surface will in this respect have been correctly rendered.” 131b33-7; Oxford Translation, 1993, p. 222 (italics and emphasis added).
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Adaptive Intelligent Management Systems for IT-Based Decision Support within Complex Reachback Processes
Professor Stefan Wolfgang Pickl, Department of Computer Science, Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany / Chair of the Advisory Board of the German Society for Operations Research (GOR) / Chair of the GOR working group “Simulation and Optimization of Complex Systems” Foundation of COMTESSA.

Abstract
This talk intends to strenghten that adaptive intelligent management systems are central elements for an intelligent IT-based decision support within complex reachback processes. Modern civilisation is expressed by network structures, big data and complex analytic processes. An holistic decision support approach should enable the flexible coordination between multiple disciplines and responsibilities which is realized via a multilayered reachback architecture.
In order to analyse now such complex adaptive systems agent-based modelling, simulation and complex analytics are an appropriate methodology for the optimization of resilient systems. The so-called IRIS (Integrated Reachback Information System)-approach focuses on the development of a technical platform that integrates these techniques.
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On the Art of Possibility: Philosophy, Linguistic Readiness, and the Attitudes of Science
Professor David J. Waters, PhD, DVM, Professor and Associate Director, Purdue Center on Aging and the Life Course, Purdue University, USA / Director, Center for Exceptional Longevity Studies, Gerald P. Murphy Cancer Foundation, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

Abstract
The sage of Concord, Ralph Waldo Emerson, wrote: “Build, therefore, your own world.”  His dictum informs that each of us has a deep responsibility – to develop an authentic relationship with the natural world.  We do this by learning to advantageously modify the objects of our experience. To achieve this goal, we must seek to develop a framework of attitudes – a philosophy – that will provide the richest repertoire of responses to each encounter.  Not surprisingly, this developmental process is contingent upon how we use language, since the act of naming is at the root of all starting points.  In this paper, it will be argued that linguistic readiness – the openness to modifying the language we use to describe our problems and our process of finding solutions to those problems – can be key to developing a special set of attitudes that can propel us toward reaching our fullest potential.  Further, it will be proposed that a healthy exposure to this array of attitudes might be achievable as part of a K–12 general science education so that future scientists and non-scientists alike can grow to become more proficient in the art of possibility.
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Language as Invention Transformed in Innovation by its Effective Use by Human Beings
Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA

Abstract
We are caught in our own mindsets, living in a fishbowl and reveling in our own name of homo sapiens sapiens (“wise man” - now “wise human”), that second “sapiens” as an added emphasis by those possibly disturbed by the emerging romantic era.  Perhaps we were getting a bit too close to nature. In preserving the best traditions of the Age of Reason humans had to be the dominant species. Philosophers and mathematicians have sought a universal language of expression, a way of naming and ultimately formalizing our own world of reason, where humans, themselves were the inventions of their god.  This naming of our animal selves as the intelligent species has provided us only with solipsistic understanding of the Universe.  In the 1950s movie The Day the Earth Stood Still aliens came down to show us the way to peace, something that humanity did not really "get" (and still doesn't).  So, we see a system in which an invention (ourselves, as what many see as God's novelty) is supposed to survive (nature as the measure of innovation), but our current survival status may be the proverbial "canary in the mine", the aliens wondering whether humans should exist at all in terms as useful beings.  Here, we reflect on what constitutes “utility”, an issue raised in the movie District 9.   How we as inventions fare as innovations is an instantiation of a larger systems problem. We are in our own ostensibly closed and deductive world, seeing only ourselves through our own bias.  One may ask whether we are all that innovative (utile), given the state of the planet after thousands of years.   Surely, Mother Nature may not see us as useful.  Innovation is the test of whether the invention is viable, and if the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists' Doomsday Clock is any indication homo sapiens sapiens will remain only an invention.
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Concept Mapping and Knowledge Modeling: A Multi-Disciplinary Information and Communication Technology
Professor John Coffey, Computer Science Department, University of West Florida, USA

Abstract
Concept maps are useful in many disciplines for the representation and communication of structured knowledge. This article contains a description of concept mapping and knowledge modeling based upon concept maps that are used for a variety of purposes. It describes applications of concept mapping and knowledge modeling for education, for knowledge preservation and sharing, for knowledge creation, as an efficient means of creating documentation, and for the creation of knowledge formalisms from informal knowledge representations. Examples are drawn from several different knowledge domains.
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Multidisciplinary Research Experiences Integrated with Industry-Field Experiences
Dr. Suzanne Lunsford, Wright State University, USA

Abstract
Multi-disciplinary inquiry-based science activities /labs for our undergraduates and high school students are designed around noteworthy issues, tasks and questions and real-world problems to solve related to industry research.  These real-world problems in inquiry-based labs require our students to utilize more than one discipline to solve their questions/problems.  Our pre- and post-test assessments have shown that the multi-disciplinary approaches increase students’ capacity to make connections in STEM fields as needed to meet the 21st century skills for today.  There are several multi-disciplinary modules that will be shared during the plenary talk that will show and discuss the problem –based activities with integration in the fields of study which require content use in all of the following areas of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, engineering and technology. Real-world problems related to industrial research will be discussed in my inquiry-based /problem solving labs are topics such as “the crisis of water contamination and what are the type of electrode sensors to detect heavy metals?”, “how to prevent corrosion” and “how to detect neurotransmitters –electrochemically and how to determine if the sensor is working”.   These are the typical real-world issues that our undergraduate students were required to problem –solve while integration of technology with instrumentation such as Cyclic Voltammetry, Square Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and X-Ray Fluorescence.   The exploration of how industry resolves these research problems are integrated into our curriculum by field site visits to research labs such as Bowser-Morner and CEMEX. These industrial research visits allow our students to run novel instrumentation and learn real-world applications to solve their research problems with the 21st century technology.
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Humboldt's Idea of Interconnectedness and its Relationship to Inter-disciplinarity and Communication
Professor Detlev Doherr, Dean of the Bachelor Degree Programs and Head of the Institute of Continuing Academic Education, University of Applied Sciences, Offenburg, Germany / Director of the Steinbeis Transfer Center of Information Technologies, Offenburg, Germany

Abstract
Alexander von Humboldt, a German scientist and explorer of the 19th century viewed the natural world holistically and described the harmony of nature among the diversity of the physical world as a conjoining between all physical disciplines. He noted in his diary: 'Everything is interconnectedness'. 
 
Following Humboldt's idea of nature an Internet edition must preserve the author’s original intention, retain an awareness of all relevant works, and should supply dynamic links to sources, maps, images, graphs and relevant texts. New forms of interaction and synthesis between humanistic texts and scientific observation need to be created.
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The Interdisciplinary Business Doctorate for Executives: A Novel Way to Bridge Academic Research and Practice
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education.

Abstract
In many European countries, particularly Germany, a doctoral degree has become a standard credential for CEOs of major companies. In the U.S., such a degree is far more the exception than the rule. Recently, however, a small number of U.S. research universities have introduced terminal business degrees that specifically target working executives. These degrees focus on applying research methods to interdisciplinary business problems. The presentation looks at the design of some of these programs—many of which are intentionally constructed to break down academic—and then considers the newly launched program at the University of South Florida.
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Applying Pasteur's Quadrant to Innovation and Technology
Professor Randy K. Avent, Founding President, Florida Polytechnic University, USA

Abstract
This talk discusses the role of technology and innovation in economic development and probes the relationships between innovation and research.  As the founding President of Florida’s first state university dedicated to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), I often think about these topics as I build a modern university with a unique mission that focuses on growing and supporting industry relationships.  For inspiration, I draw upon the research paradigm known as “Pasteur’s Quadrant” proposed by Donald Stokes in 1997 to describe what is now called use-inspired basic research.  This talk will review these concepts and use them as a launching point to describe the role of innovation in economic development.
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Integrating Academy with Industry: The Industry Perspective
Dr. Matthew Mullarkey, Director of the Doctor of Business Administration Program, University of South Florida, USA

Abstract
As academics, we tend to view the benefits of integrating research and practice from the researcher's perspective. There is, however, another perspective: that of the industry practitioner. Entering a Ph.D. program in Information Systems and earning his degree after more than 25 years as an executive and military officer, Dr. Mullarkey is in a unique position to comment on this perspective. After describing some of his own experiences, Dr. Mullarkey will introduce a number of executives that have recently joined the inaugural cohort of the Doctor of Business Administration program at the Muma College of Business of the University of South Florida. These individuals will talk about their own personal motivations for undertaking a research-focused degree while continuing to manage their organizations.
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At the Intersection of Consulting, Research and Higher Education
Professor Jan Klakurka, School of Management, University of Toronto, Canada / Past Director, Corporate Planning and Business Development of the Wasteco Group of Companies, and Professor Bill Irwin, University of Western Ontario, Canada / Department of Economics and Business, Huron University College / Principal at Irwin and Associates

Abstract
The keynote speakers outline how post-secondary educators engaged in private sector consolation activities bring multidimensional benefits to both their educational institution and students. For the consulting academic, clients provide a wealth of information regarding current practice; “real world” case study material; and, help to ground their institutional research in practicality. For the clients, seeking advice from academics may be quite different than the services provided by traditional consulting firms; in turn leading to potentially better (and more than likely different) outcomes. Finally, in the classroom, the academic-consultant can provide experiential opportunities that link theory to practice and offer students coveted real-world knowledge.   All sides win; but the biggest benefactor is the academic, who researches, consults and teaches, given the possibility of deeper relationships and insights.
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Open Up or Close Down - Why Openness Might Be the Key Factor to Future Success
Dipl.-Ing. Manuel Moritz, Research Associate, Institute of Production Engineering at the Helmut-Schmidt-University / University of the Federal Armed Forces in Hamburg, Germany.

Abstract
In many industries, we observe a paradigm shift from traditional value creation towards co-creation and open production approaches. The boundaries of companies dissolve and many more players (suppliers, customers, community members, etc.) are integrated into the value creation process. Thus, a new understanding and taxonomy of value creation has to be introduced as a reference model in order to describe new phenomena based on Bottom-up economics. In this context, openness as a precondition to participation, cooperation and interaction can be seen as a critical success factor.
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The HY-DE Model: An Interdisciplinary Attempt to Deal with the Phenomenon of Hyperattention
Dr. Erzsebet Dani, Faculty of Informatics, University of Debrecen, Hungary.

Abstract
International research indicates that the accelerating development of digital devices as well as the flood and diversity of the information they convey transforms the reading, thinking and learning habits of the digital generations. Hyperattention is one striking consequence. I developed a method (the HY-DE model) on the basis of an interdisciplinary approach, and it is meant to deal with this phenomenon: i.e., to harness hyperattention so that deep attention, which hyper attention suppresses in the electronic learning process, could again be liberated and functional in a meaningful way in the learning process.
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Cognitive Deep Learning Technology for Big Data
Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, CEI of LP Information Technology, Northeastern University, USA / Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University Harvard University, and Principal Research Physicist at The Air Force Research Laboratory.

Abstract
Efficiently extracting information from huge amount of data becomes more and more challenging. A most promising approach is to model abilities of human mind - cognitive algorithms. The talk describes cognitive algorithms, their applications to various engineering problems, and their foundations in mathematical models of the mind including higher cognitive abilities. Mechanisms of the mind include concepts, emotions, dynamic logic, and deep hierarchy of mental abilities including language, cognition and their interaction. Big Data informatics requires algorithms modeling all these abilities. Machine learning, artificial intelligence, and modeling of the mind has been plagued by computational complexity, CC, since the 1960s. We discuss dynamic logic (DL) overcoming CC when analyzing Big Data. DL is a process-logic, which replaces static states of classical logic; it serves as a basis for cognitive algorithms and for a mathematical theory of learning, combining the mechanisms of the mind into a hierarchical system of mental processes. Each process proceeds "from vague to crisp," from vague representation-concepts to crisp ones. Brain imaging and psychological experiments (Bar et al 2006; Kveraga et al 2007; Price 2012; Masataka & Perlovsky 2012) confirmed this as an adequate model of the brain perception, cognition, and higher mental functions.
 
Computational difficulty is related to Gödelian problems in logic: computational complexity is a manifestation of Gödelian incompleteness in finite systems, such as computers or brains. The mind is "not logical." Dynamic logic overcomes this difficulty. Engineering applications demonstrate orders of magnitude improvement in Big Data informatics, finding objects of interest in oceans of data, information integration, financial predictions, genetic studies, cybersecurity.
The dual hierarchy learning model of interacting language and cognition integrates language, text, and sensor data. A number of "mysteries" in this interaction are explained: what is the role of language in cognition, why children can talk before they really understand, how much adults are different from children in this respect, etc. These are explained in the model, and explanations are confirmed in brain imaging experiments (Binder et al 2005; Price 2012). Much difficulties in developing Big Data algorithms are related to confusing language and cognition.
 
The knowledge instinct drives acquisition of cognitive ability and is a foundation of all our higher cognitive abilities. Its satisfaction is experienced as aesthetic emotions (experimentally confirmed in Cabanac et al 2010). Efficient engineering algorithms must model these emotional abilities (Perlovsky, Deming, Ilin, 2011). The hierarchy of aesthetic emotions is discussed from understanding of everyday objects, to understanding of abstract concepts throughout the hierarchy, to the near top of the mental hierarchy. Contents of these "highest" concepts are discussed and the corresponding aesthetic emotions are related to the beautiful. Actions realizing beauty in one's life are related to emotions of spiritually sublime. Experimental tests of this conjecture are for the near future.
 
Contradictions among knowledge are experienced as negative aesthetic emotions, cognitive dissonance. Development of robots and human-computer interactions require algorithms modeling this ability. Cognitive dissonance counteracts the knowledge instinct and would prevent accumulation of knowledge and the entire human evolution, if not a special ability evolved for overcoming these emotions. It follows from the dual hierarchy model that this mechanism is music. This theoretical prediction has been experimentally confirmed (Masataka et al 2012, 2013, Cabanac et al, 2013). This explains the origin and evolution of music, what Darwin called the greatest mystery.
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Creativity & Complexity
Professor Jonathan S. Feinstein, John G. Searle Professor of Economics and Management, Yale School of Management, Yale University, USA

Abstract
Creativity is not just the moment of insight or when an idea strikes. It is rooted in and grows out of a rich, integrative process unfolding over time and involving many factors. This process includes learning, exploration, intuition and reflection, experimentation, adaptation, and unexpected experiences and responses. It is a winding path - which ultimately leads to novel connections and discoveries. It is a process that is inherently complex and occurs in rich, inherently complex environments. This description fits human creativity, and I believe is likely to be true for any beings or agents with abilities to form concepts, learn, and adapt, evolving ideas and innovations over relatively long paths of development.
 
The view of creativity as rooted in a complex process is at odds with much of the literature on creativity. It also challenges conventional social science perspectives, which often focus on relatively simple models of behavior and innovation, missing the specificity and uniqueness of individuals’ paths of development and not modeling their rich patterns of learning, experience and exploration.
 
In my keynote I will argue for this complexity perspective (with examples), then outline a modeling approach linking decision analysis with knowledge representation, pointing the way towards more satisfactory models and understanding of the creative process in relation to fields and complex systems.
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Work Integrated Learning and Learning Integrated Work - a Love Story between Academia and Working Life?
Professor Martin Gellerstedt, Department of Business and IT, Division of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics, University West, Sweden.

Abstract
Higher education is perhaps facing the most unprecedented challenges ever. Financial turbulence, high unemployment rates, demographical changes, technological development and increased demands for high competence certainly implies the importance of putting cooperation between academia and working life on top of the agenda. 
 
The aim with work integrated learning is to enhance learning and prepare for working life by letting knowledge from research go hand in hand with experience based knowledge. This is often discussed in the view of how working life could cross the border into academia. However, a challenge for higher education is to discuss how to cross the border in the opposite direction. How could academia support learning integrated work? How could we foster a new generation of professionals to become boundary crossers, reflective practitioners and be a part of a continuously improved community of practice?
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Educational Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Plenary Participatory Workshop) - Part 1 of 2
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education.

Abstract
For well over a hundred years, primary and higher education in the U.S. were the envy of the world. Today, however, that leadership has been seriously challenged. With respect to K-12 education, many have already conceded defeat, as the U.S. continues to drop in global rankings of student performance. As far higher education, ever-growing costs and questions about student employability upon graduation suggest we may be following a similar path. The one bright spot continues to be U.S. graduate education. Ironically, at least in the STEM fields, the high demand being experienced by U.S. programs is almost entirely the result of international students flocking to these programs.
 
The U.S. is not unique in facing these challenges. Indeed, in today’s dynamic economic environments, traditional educational systems are increasingly being pressured to adapt. Unfortunately, the twin forces of globalization and technology often produce to mixed signals. On the one hand, as more students complete their education in many locations, there is pressure to standardize curricula in order to promoter transferability. An example is the Bologna Process in the European Union, which attempts to increase the connectivity of disparate university systems. On the other hand, unique local conditions and continually evolving technology and business models seem to require greater adaptability.
 
Education is not unique in facing these challenges. For decades, businesses have dealt with issues such as competing across borders, managing relationships with unions, dealing with regulations and continuously adapting their business models. Fostering the capacity to innovation and encouraging entrepreneurship have proven particularly effective tools in addressing dynamic environments. The obvious question is: What can we do to foster similar activities and attitudes in education? 
 
The purpose of this panel is to provide a forum for participants—particular those in the audience--to discuss both the challenges and opportunities of educational innovation and entrepreneurship, particularly as they apply to higher education. After a brief introduction by the panelists, the list of questions to be discussed might include:
  • What constitutes a true “educational innovation”?
  • What are some of the institutional barriers to educational innovation?
  • To what degree should practice be allowed to dictate the content of our education?
  • What examples can we offer of successful educational innovations? (Of particular interest are the experiences of the audience).
  • What techniques can an educational entrepreneur use to encourage adoption of ideas within an institution? External to an institution?
  • What role do intellectual property rules and laws play in fostering or inhibiting educational innovation?
  • What is the role does scholarly or applied research and educational entrepreneurship?
The session will be highly interactive, with panelists speaking briefly, off the cuff, without formal presentations. Also, if a conference attendee should feel that he or she has particularly useful insights or experiences, he or she can request to be added to the panel. If you feel you fall into that category, you are encouraged to speak to Dr. Nagib Callaos or Dr. Grandon Gill prior to the scheduled start time for the panel.
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Educational Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Plenary Participatory Workshop) - Part 2 of 2
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education.

Abstract
For well over a hundred years, primary and higher education in the U.S. were the envy of the world. Today, however, that leadership has been seriously challenged. With respect to K-12 education, many have already conceded defeat, as the U.S. continues to drop in global rankings of student performance. As far higher education, ever-growing costs and questions about student employability upon graduation suggest we may be following a similar path. The one bright spot continues to be U.S. graduate education. Ironically, at least in the STEM fields, the high demand being experienced by U.S. programs is almost entirely the result of international students flocking to these programs.
 
The U.S. is not unique in facing these challenges. Indeed, in today’s dynamic economic environments, traditional educational systems are increasingly being pressured to adapt. Unfortunately, the twin forces of globalization and technology often produce to mixed signals. On the one hand, as more students complete their education in many locations, there is pressure to standardize curricula in order to promoter transferability. An example is the Bologna Process in the European Union, which attempts to increase the connectivity of disparate university systems. On the other hand, unique local conditions and continually evolving technology and business models seem to require greater adaptability.
 
Education is not unique in facing these challenges. For decades, businesses have dealt with issues such as competing across borders, managing relationships with unions, dealing with regulations and continuously adapting their business models. Fostering the capacity to innovation and encouraging entrepreneurship have proven particularly effective tools in addressing dynamic environments. The obvious question is: What can we do to foster similar activities and attitudes in education? 
 
The purpose of this panel is to provide a forum for participants—particular those in the audience--to discuss both the challenges and opportunities of educational innovation and entrepreneurship, particularly as they apply to higher education. After a brief introduction by the panelists, the list of questions to be discussed might include:
  • What constitutes a true “educational innovation”?
  • What are some of the institutional barriers to educational innovation?
  • To what degree should practice be allowed to dictate the content of our education?
  • What examples can we offer of successful educational innovations? (Of particular interest are the experiences of the audience).
  • What techniques can an educational entrepreneur use to encourage adoption of ideas within an institution? External to an institution?
  • What role do intellectual property rules and laws play in fostering or inhibiting educational innovation?
  • What is the role does scholarly or applied research and educational entrepreneurship?
The session will be highly interactive, with panelists speaking briefly, off the cuff, without formal presentations. Also, if a conference attendee should feel that he or she has particularly useful insights or experiences, he or she can request to be added to the panel. If you feel you fall into that category, you are encouraged to speak to Dr. Nagib Callaos or Dr. Grandon Gill prior to the scheduled start time for the panel.
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Expresión de Emociones en Entornos de Enseñanza Aprendizaje Híbridos
Profesora Victoria Eugenia Valencia Maya, Departamento de Ciencias Humanas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Colombia.

Abstract
Uno de los retos que enfrenta la educación en la llamada sociedad de la información, es la necesidad de reflexionar acerca de la utilización de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) en los procesos de enseñanza aprendizaje, buscando superar tendencias educativas instruccionales y avanzar hacia una educación formativa que el mundo contemporáneo demanda.
 
En tal sentido, se presentan los avances de un estudio cuyo objetivo consiste en interpretar la dimensión emocional presente en un contexto de enseñanza aprendizaje de modalidad híbrida, que aglutina tanto lo presencial como lo virtual. El análisis de datos realizado desde el paradigma interpretativo o hermenéutico ha permitido un acercamiento al objetivo del estudio, al tiempo que llama la atención sobre la necesaria inclusión de propuestas didácticas novedosas para este tipo de entornos educativos.
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El uso de la Innovación y de las TIC's como Puntos de Crecimiento de las Pequeñas y Medianas Empresas (Caso Aguascalientes México)
"Dr. Miguel Ángel Oropeza Tagle,  Departamento de Contaduría, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, México / Miembro del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores / Director de Oropeza Tagle y Asociados, y Dr. Jesús Salvador Vivanco Florido, Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, México / Miembro del Cuerpo Académico Consolidado “Gestión de la Pequeña y Medina Empresa” / Miembro del Sistema Nacional de Investigadores,  Nivel I."

Abstract
 Preocupados por el desarrollo y el crecimiento de las PYME’s, debido a su alta contribución en el PIB y a que ha sido una gran fuente de generación empleo en México; llevamos a cabo una investigación en busca de estrategias que pueden ayudar a la supervivencia de las PYMES, en México, y con base de la literatura revisada, y la evidencia empírica localizada, podemos concluir que la innovación y el uso de la TIC’s, son las herramientas necesarias para que las PYME’s en México, pueden sobrevivir y mejorar sus ganancias, basándose en la exportación, la nueva tecnología y la introducción de productos innovadores en el mercado que son la clave para la mejora de la PYME; pero para realizar estas acciones es necesario invertir una gran cantidad de recursos, financieros materiales y humanos, como la formación y capacitación de empresarios y adquisición de equipos informáticos para estar en posibilidad de enfrentar a la competencia internacional y la innovación tecnológica constante.
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Simulación con Visualización: Un Problema Multi- e Inter-disciplinario Integrado en la Actividad Académica
"Profesor José David Alanís Urquieta, División de Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicación, Universidad Tecnológica de Puebla, México."

Abstract
En este trabajo se explora de manera substancial el conjunto de esfuerzos científicos y académicos que representa la simulación con visualización, como un problema para visualizar mediante la computadora un fenómeno de la vida real de casi cualquier índole. Estas problemáticas son resueltas mediante esfuerzos que se observa son multi e interdisciplinarios. Además se presume necesario integrar este quehacer a las actividades académicas en apoyo a la solución de problemáticas diversas. Se presentan algunos casos de estudio ilustrativos que se han encontrado en la actividad académica.