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Cybernetics and Cybersecurity: bringing Order to Chaos
Scott D. Foote, National Security Engineering Center,The Lead for MITRE's "Cyber Operations Center", MITRE Corporation, USA

Abstract
Problem: The impact and visibility of cybersecurity breaches continues to rise. Fortune.com estimates that more than 140 countries have some level of cyber weapon development program. Mandiant (now FireEye) estimates that successful attackers are staying resident for >200 days on average, and that these attacks and breaches may already be costing the global economy $Trillions (2014 Mandiant Report). Today’s attackers are professionals, targeting the enterprise’s growing vulnerability. Vulnerability inherent in the expanding complexity, accessibility and dependencies that the enterprise has on information and supporting technology. In response, the Cybersecurity solution marketplace continues to grow, yet remains highly fragmented with 100s of companies providing point solutions in a wide range of categories: network security; intrusion detection/prevention; unified threat management; endpoint security; mobile and IoT security; “cloud” security; application security; data-at-rest and message security; threat intelligence and analytics; security operations & incident response; risk & compliance; etc. This is essentially a cyber “arms race”; and there is no “silver bullet”. CISOs and cybersecurity professionals are faced with a daunting challenge of unprecedented complexity and scale – effectively reducing the Risk to their business.

Engineering Approach: This session will discuss the application of contemporary Systems Engineering discipline to bring some Order to this Chaos – specifically Needs Analysis and Solution Concept Evolution. Conventional Needs Analysis in this domain suffers from the significant complexity of today’s enterprise, its unprecedented dependencies on highly-vulnerable information technology (cyberspace), and urgent demands for immediate solutions that mitigate the risk. “Decomposition” is discussed as a technique for iteratively reducing Abstract Needs into Concrete Requirements. Then, “Re-composition” (iterative System Design, Development, Deployment and continuous integration) is presented as a technique for rapidly evolving effective Solution Concepts.

Solution Concept: Finally, the session will briefly introduce a new system concept for “Cyber Situation Awareness”, informing enterprise-scale Cybersecurity – a federation of people, processes, and enabling technologies – that fuses multi-dimensional intelligence (of information systems and networks, the mission/business dependencies on them, and the emerging cyber threat targeting them) into a complex knowledgebase that provides "signal filtering" for more effective cybersecurity and risk management decisions supporting the "Complex System" that is the enterprise.
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Cybersecurity: Year in Review and Future Trends
Sri Sridharan, Florida Center for Cybersecurity, University of South Florida, USA

Abstract
As Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer of the Florida Center for Cybersecurity (FC2), Sri Sridharan provides strategic oversight of the Center and is responsible for spearheading initiatives focused on driving workforce development, attracting new industry, and positioning Florida as the national leader in cybersecurity.
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Securing Information Systems in an Uncertain World: Enterprise Level Security
Dr. William Simpson, Institute for Defense Analyses, USA

Abstract
Increasing complexity and new computing hardware and techniques have made the fortress approach to security espoused by NIST and implemented throughout the defense and banking industry unworkable. This presentation provides a modern alternative to this approach. The new approach to security is more distributed and has no need for passwords or accounts. The security approach is derived from a set of tenants that form the basic security model requirements. At each step in process it determines identities and claims for access and privileges. These techniques have been proven to be resilient, secure, extensible, scalable, and are currently being implemented on a broad scale for a particular enterprise.
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Towards a Common Approach for Cyber Security of Critical Infrastructures
Dr. Mario Lamanna, Evoelectronics, Italy; Selex-SI, USA

Abstract
Critical infrastructures are a preferred target for cyber criminality. Contrasting the attacks to critical infrastructures is a primary issue for the entire society, due to the essential services they perform. A common multidisciplinary approach to make critical infrastructure secure must be based on the analysis of cultural and geopolitical origins of this kind of cyber crime. The proposed cyber security approach relies on new technologies, namely the use of social networks, the analysis of big data and fusion of real time, intelligence data and environmental data. Given the delicate aspects of human life covered by the specific topic, the use of new technologies must be balanced with human issues, in order to get the maximum benefit and minimize negative side effects.
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Teaching Security at the UAS Technikum Wien: an Interdisciplinary Approach in Higher Education
Professor Harald Wahl and Professor Christian H. W. Kaufmann, University of Applied Sciences (UAS) Technikum Wien, Austria

Abstract
Computer Security is per se a very technical orientated area of expertise but due to the deep embedment into companies not only infrastructure but also into the companies processes Security can no longer be considered for itself. Students who major in Security still have to be excellent technicians but this is not enough to face today's Security tasks. In addition to their duties to secure the companies systems, they also have to rise Security awareness of all employees, continuously research new risk, audit the companies processes, manage their department, lead projects, do security tests of the systems and many more. Therefor their ability spectrum has to involve many interdisciplinary beside good technical skills.At the University of Applied Science Technikum Wien, especially in the master degree program "Information Management & IT Security" but also in other course programs these interdisciplinary skills are an integrated part of the courses. In the Keynote we present our approach of teaching Security in higher education.
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Strategy Implementation in Technical University using Smart Information System: Lessons Learned in Riga Technical University
Professor Rector Leonids Ribikis, Faculty of Power and Electrical Engineering, Riga Technical University, Latvia

Abstract
Modern administration of a university requires new approaches and solutions. More complex information technology systems are becoming everyday necessity to foster quality and accessibility of education, scientific key performance indicators, sustainable valorisation and internal information exchange in technology focused university. Still questions remain how to link these IT platforms with processes at university and achieve desired goals and increase their popularity within university. Riga Technical University has developed more than 20 different inter-linked IT frameworks that help to achieve strategic goals and increase key performance indicators.
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Information in Health Care: Why, How, What, When, by and For Whose Interest?
Professor Martin Gellerstedt, Department of Business and IT Division of Law, Economics, Statistics and Politics, University West, Sweden

Abstract
Imagine a life without variation – wouldn’t that be unbearably boring? It is clear that, we as humans being should appreciate variability in our everyday lives. But, on the other hand the uncertainty that goes hand in hand with variability, is sometimes a challenge to handle when making decisions. Medicine was sometimes, at least some decades ago, referred to as the “art of making decisions without adequate information”. But isn’t there information enough today? Well, this talk will give an overview of the Evidence based crusade in health care and give some reflections regarding “adequate information”, from classical randomized controlled trials to potentials with social media.
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Situating Subjectivity Within the Science of Performance: Toward Building a Method-Constituting Self for a Self-Constituting World
Professor David J. Waters, PhD, DVM, Purdue Center on Aging and the Life Course, Purdue University, USA; Gerald P. Murphy Cancer Foundation, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA

Abstract
What can I know? What should I do? These are some of the fundamental questions asked by persons seeking to perform at their greatest potential. The purpose of this paper will be to provide scientists and non-scientists with a perspective on subjectivity. Conventional education with its emphasis on knowledge content overlooks or ignores subjectivity – how we take and make the world through a process of individual mind-building. This paper will attempt to delineate a framework of attitudes and sensibilities that can help to develop a useful method for making sense of the objects of our experience, achieving the goal of more effective prediction, explanation, and productive action. First, the language surrounding the subjectivity-objectivity tension will be explored, attempting to more clearly differentiate terms such as subjectivism, subjectivity, and intersubjectivity. Then, the role of subjectivity in personal performance will be developed – informed through several entry-points, including: the embodied subject of the philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty; the Personal Construct Theory of psychologist George A. Kelly; Thomas Nagel’s “What is it like to be a Bat?”; and the writings of the poet Wallace Stevens. Ultimately, the aim will be to situate subjectivity as key to the business of performance, seeing subjectivity as a process of meaning-making, seeing objectivity as a direction in which understanding can move. Finally, it will be proposed that an essential element to performance is developing a dialogic self-awareness, embracing the underappreciated interplay between body and language and subjectivity so that we might advance confidently and sensibly in our roles as object in the world, subject for the world.
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Hypertextuality in Digital Libraries: Alexander Von Humboldt's Visions
Professor Detlev Doherr, University of Applied Sciences, Offenburg, Germany

Abstract
Digital libraries are providing books, which are digitized as static texts in data files. However the information technology is insufficiently developed to adequately illustrate the scientific works and the foresight of the researcher Alexander von Humboldt, a German explorer and scientist of the 19th century.

The Humboldt Digital Library opens innovative options for better understanding of Humboldt’s visions of nature because of implemented methods of dynamic hyperlinking within the archive and other online sources. Additionally the interconnection to the Wolfram's knowledge engine enables automatic generation of ontological structures and object classification as a step forward to a system with artificial intelligence.
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Managing the Interoperability and Privacy of eHealth Systems as an Interdisciplinary Challenge
Professor Ing. Alexandru Soceanu, Department of Computer Science and Mathematics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Abstract
For many decades interdisciplinary cooperations have led to new research projects and new academic disciplines, e.g. medical informatics, bioinformatics and mechatronics. Nowadays, an interdisciplinary concept has even become a must for the success of funding proposals and large European projects. The underlying premise of high-quality interdisciplinary work: partners with a strong disciplinary identity.

This keynote speech will focus on interdisciplinary solutions for one of today's greatest challenges worldwide: healthcare. Managing factors with critical impact (e.g. interoperability, security, privacy, standards and laws) is a key to achieving such complex solutions. Practical examples will be presented. These include interdisciplinary European research concerning the remote control and managing of wearable dialysis devices of the future, as well as ERASMUS-funded international education programs for creating future interdisciplinary expert networks aimed at developing and implementing more effective healthcare systems.
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Educational Innovation: Bridging Academic Research and Practice via Interdisciplinary Business Doctorate for Executives
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA

Abstract
Recently, a small number of U.S. research universities have introduced terminal business degrees that specifically target working executives. These degrees focus on learning to apply research methods to business problems with the expectation that candidates will remain in practice after they receive their degrees. Because complex business problems demand interdisciplinary solutions, these programs diverge significantly from their disciplinary Ph.D counterparts. Rather than training doctoral students as apprentices seeking to acquire the skills of the academic research craft, these executive students are viewed as long term partners who need to develop a research skill set that complements, rather than duplicates, that of their professorial counterparts. The presentation looks at the design of some of these programs—many of which are intentionally constructed to break down academic silos—and reports on the first year of the newly launched DBA program at the University of South Florida.
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Integrating Academy with Industry: The Industry Perspective
Dr. Matthew Mullarkey, Director of the DBA Program, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA

Abstract
As academics, we tend to view the benefits of integrating research and practice from the researcher's perspective. There is, however, another perspective: that of the industry practitioner. Over the past twenty years business researchers, in particular, have been encouraged to conduct more and more research with a theoretical focus that is often at odds with the conduct of social science research that investigates sticky, wicked problems that interest practice. In his keynote, Dr. Mullarkey will focus on the opportunity to look to scholarly practitioners to span this research gap and generate robust, relevant inquiry that informs the practice and the academic communities alike. He takes the position that professional doctoral programs are beginning to serve the need for research partnerships that bridge the industry-academy divide. As demonstrable proof, Dr. Mullarkey will introduce a number of executives engaged in the Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) degree program at the University of South Florida's Muma College of Business. These individuals will talk about their own personal motivations for undertaking a research-focused degree while continuing to work in their professional pursuits.
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Spanning the Practice: Research Gap - Consulting and Research Complementaries in the Management Academy
Professor Jan Klakurka, School of Management, University of Toronto, Canada / Professor Bill Irwin, Department of Economics and Business, Huron University College affiliated with the University of Western Ontario, Canada

Abstract
The authors of this paper build on previous investigation into the intersection of research, consulting and higher education to outline the rationale in favour of management academics undertaking external consulting activities to inform their research and teaching agendas.  Using case experience from their engagements in the consulting marketplace, the authors will identify key linkages with research and teaching.  Instead of leaving the “practice-research gap” as a void between members of Academy and industry, the authors suggest that Academic-consultants with strong foundations in each of practice and research can – and should – bridge the gap, writing a new narrative for business academics as purveyors of both sound and relevant insight.
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Complexity, Beautiful, and Meaning
Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, CEI of LP Information Technology, Northeastern University, USA; Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University Harvard University; Principal Research Physicist at The Air Force Research Laboratory.

Abstract
Mathematical modeling of the mind has been attempted since the 1950s, yet existing mathematical methods could not model the mind mechanisms. Even algorithms for "simple" perception have met computational complexity. Simple cases such as perception of isolated objects could be modeled, but algorithms for perception of multiple objects in presence of noise required the number of operations larger than all interactions of elementary particles in the Universe. This problem also interfered with solving complex engineering problems "artificial intelligence."

Fundamental reasons for this complexity have been related to logic. Gödelian arguments leading to fundamental limitations of logic, when applied to finite systems have led to complexity. Even algorithms specifically designed to overcome limitations of logic, such as neural networks, and fuzzy systems, used logic at some steps and inexorably encountered complexity that could not have been overcome.

A new mathematical theory dynamic logic, DL, has been designed to overcome this fundamental limitation. Instead of static states of classical logic DL is a process logic. DL processes evolve "from vague to crisp," they explain that logical states in the mind appear at the end of vague thinking processes and for this reason do not lead to complexity. DL has overcome computational complexity and makes possible to model the mind. An understanding of the mind becomes possible. A fundamental aspect of the working of the mind is that representations are vague.

Mind processes of cognition and emotions are organized into a hierarchy. Cognition works by matching contents of mental representations to patterns in the world. This matching requires improvement of representations, in other words improvement of knowledge. The mind constantly improves representations motivated by emotions; these special emotions related to knowledge are aesthetic emotions. Kant was the first to suggest that aesthetic emotions are related to knowledge. Representations at higher levels of the hierarchy are built on lower levels of vague representations, and they are vaguer and less accessible to consciousness. This theoretical conclusion has been proved in the mind imaging experiments.

What exactly are emotions and contents of representations at the "top" of the mental hierarchy? At every level of the hierarchy representations unify lower level representations into more general and abstract concepts. The highest representations attempt to unify knowledge at all lower levels. Contents of these most general representations unifying our entire life are experienced as the meaning of life. When we understand complex abstract ideas we may experience pleasant aesthetic emotions. The highest aesthetic emotions experienced when understanding the most general representations, when understanding of the meaning of life improves, these highest aesthetic emotions are the emotions of the beautiful.

I will tell about recent experiments confirming these theoretical predictions. Of course experimental confirmations of predictions of a theory are the foundations of science from Newton to Einstein. A new area of science, physics of the mind emerges.
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Connecting Educators with Inter-Disciplinary Inquiry-Based Science and Students with STEM Careers with Real-World Experiences
Dr. Suzanne Lunsford, Department of Chemistry, Wright State University, USA

Abstract
Our professional development workshops have provided participating teachers with inter-disciplinary inquiry-based learning experiences in earth and environmental science that have built their content into real-world problem based research initiatives. Our educators that participate in these professional development workshops build content on water quality and how to test water quality to determine the impact on their own community. These workshops make a connection with industry and build upon the need for our uses of water, minerals, metals and fuels and how these essential concepts in chemical engineering are vital to understand to become literate scientist to meet the needs of the industrial workforce. The Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers are not on the participants’ radar and these inter-disciplinary inquiry-based labs and field experiences assist the participants with a better understanding of the environmental science/geoscience careers that are available as well. Our professional development workshops are focused on educating the underrepresented and underserved populations to assist with their future STEM opportunity careers in industry. The scientific and engineering practices of: Developing and Using Models, Inquiring Questions, Planning Investigations, Inquiring and Interpreting Data, Utilizing Computational /Mathematical Thinking, Constructing Explanations, Engaging in Debate from Evidence and Gaining Data, Assessing and Distributing Information are all the skills carried out during our professional development workshop. The content gains in the professional development workshops were assessed by R.R. Hake’ method which have shown enhanced content gains with the inter-disciplinary inquiry-based technique as expected with this style of professional development program.
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Humans: Disturbing Factors or Critical Resources in Sociotechnical Systems?
Dr. Toni Wäfler, School of Applied Psychology, Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Switzerland

Abstract
Work systems are sociotechnical systems consisting of technical sub-systems (i.e. technical equipment, production resources, regulations, facilities, etc.) and social sub-systems (i.e. all individuals and groups with specific skills and needs as well as formal and informal relations). To optimize overall system performance a joint optimization of technical and social sub-systems is required. However, humans make errors, take wrong decisions, miss something, are prone for distraction and suffer from fatigue. This is why humans are normally considered to be a risk factor. As a consequences system design often aims at mitigating this human risk by the means of automation. The aim is to replace the human or at the least to control human behavior. The assumption behind is that by doing so the system becomes more reliable and safe. This point of view underestimates the contribution humans provide to a successful system performance. A major precondition of complex systems' viability is their ability to adapt to dynamics. Humans due to their flexibility and creativity are a major resource of this adaptability. However, whether or not humans can fulfill this role is determined by system design, i.e. by balancing social and technical system design.
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Online Learning as a Catalyst for More Deliberate Pedagogies
Dr. Lorayne Robertson, Faculty of Education, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), Canada

Abstract
Digital technologies open new teaching and learning spaces in higher education but enthusiasm for innovation should be conservatively tempered with considerations of whether or not these spaces translate into more enabling student learning environments. Online learning, in itself, does not necessarily predict that students will more easily meet course outcomes or achieve understandings of key concepts. Nor does e-learning necessarily predict the presence of deeper, more critical, or more transformative types of learning in education. What is undisputed, however, is that the emergence of multiple e-learning spaces brings with it the potential to re-examine present pedagogies in higher education and reconsider these pedagogies in more deliberate ways. In this paper, one theory of online learning is used as a framework to examine possibilities for more enabling online learning environments. Within this structure, the concept of uncoverage as a pedagogical and assessment stance will be considered, as this curricular and program direction has emerged as a form of pedagogy for learners of all ages. Specific examples from the research literature where less visible but more deliberate and transformative pedagogies are being applied in higher learning will be considered including examples from the author’s current research. The findings suggest that it would be prudent to maintain an open, investigative stance toward the potential of e-learning environments as a catalyst for more deliberate pedagogies.
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Credibility, Logic, and Emotion: Rhetoric in STEM Fields
Dr. Flurije Salihu, College of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University, USA

Abstract
This presentation will be oriented to show the importance of Rhetoric (Ethos, Pathos and Logos) for Inter-Disciplinary Communication. The basic reasons are the following:

1. The Ethos is a necessary condition in order to have credibility in the eyes of people from other disciplines.
2. The Pathos (emotion) is highly desirable (even necessary) because people from other disciplines might be less self-motivated to listen to someone from other discipline and to make the respective mental effort in trying to understand from another disciplinary perspective, reflect on this understanding, and potentially generate analogical thinking which is input to logical thinking and to hypothesis formulation which will be tested later according the listener discipline.
3. The Logos is essential for being able to translate the disciplinary language to natural language. This require to be knowledgeable not only in the technical/disciplinary Logos but also in the general Logos with its inherent natural language correct use (Grammar) and the communicational skills to generate an effective dialogue and critical thinking (Dialectic). Hence an updated TRIVIUM might be essential for inter-disciplinary communication.
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Case Studies in Cyber Security (Plenary Participatory Workshop) (Part 1 of 5)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr Manish Agrawal, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; USF General Education Council; USF Research Council; Former College of Business representative; USF Faculty Senate / Mr. Shane Collier, Founder of Consolidated Reality, USA; Antarctic Scientific Research.

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.
Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:
  • Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
  • Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
  • Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
  • Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.
Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course”) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Case Studies in Cyber Security (Plenary Participatory Workshop) (Part 2 of 5)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr Manish Agrawal, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; USF General Education Council; USF Research Council; Former College of Business representative; USF Faculty Senate / Mr. Shane Collier, Founder of Consolidated Reality, USA; Antarctic Scientific Research.

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.
Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:
  • Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
  • Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
  • Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
  • Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.
Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course”) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Case Studies in Cyber Security (Plenary Participatory Workshop) (Part 3 of 5)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr Manish Agrawal, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; USF General Education Council; USF Research Council; Former College of Business representative; USF Faculty Senate / Mr. Shane Collier, Founder of Consolidated Reality, USA; Antarctic Scientific Research.

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.
Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:
  • Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
  • Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
  • Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
  • Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.
Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course”) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Case Studies in Cyber Security (Plenary Participatory Workshop) (Part 4 of 5)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr Manish Agrawal, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; USF General Education Council; USF Research Council; Former College of Business representative; USF Faculty Senate / Mr. Shane Collier, Founder of Consolidated Reality, USA; Antarctic Scientific Research.

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.
Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:
  • Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
  • Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
  • Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
  • Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.
Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course”) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Case Studies in Cyber Security (Plenary Participatory Workshop) (Part 5 of 5)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr Manish Agrawal, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; USF General Education Council; USF Research Council; Former College of Business representative; USF Faculty Senate / Mr. Shane Collier, Founder of Consolidated Reality, USA; Antarctic Scientific Research.

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.
Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:
  • Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
  • Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
  • Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
  • Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.
Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course”) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Case Studies on Integrating Research, Education, and Real Life Problem Solving (Conversational Participatory Panel) (Part 1 of 2)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr Manish Agrawal, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; USF General Education Council; USF Research Council; Former College of Business representative; USF Faculty Senate / Mr. Shane Collier, Founder of Consolidated Reality, USA; Antarctic Scientific Research.

Abstract
There is a growing academic and societal need for the integration of academic activities among themselves and with Society, including private and public sectors. An increasing number of academics have noticed the importance of integrating Research, Education, and Problem Solving (IRESP) among themselves and with societal and corporate real life problems. Information and Communications Technologies enabled different ways of supporting these kinds of integration processes. Informing Science is at the heart of academic activities (research, education, and consulting).

An increasing number of specific projects showed to be effective in achieving this kind of integration. What it is probably lacking is a general methodology that can support the conception, design, and effective implementation of this kind of projects.  We strongly belief that case study methods can be applied to conceive methodologies for this kind of projects as well as for the transference of effective design and implantation of this kind of projects into other new projects in the same discipline or in any other disciplines, i.e. among different disciplinary culture. If this is true then it might also be possible to conceive a methodology for this kind of transference between different cultures and socio-economic contexts.

The objective of this conversational session is to open an inter-disciplinary and inter-cultural dialogue. Dr. Gill is a renowned scholar, practitioner, and expert in the Case Method. Dr. Suzanne Lunsford conceived and effectively implemented several specific projects in IREPS in the area of Chemistry, and Dr Nagib Callaos is also conceived and implemented IRESP projects in Information systems Development and software engineering for about 30 Years. Dr. Callaos also the conceptual co-designer of a general methodology in information systems development which process was supported by informal case studies or report after a project had been finished. After each specific application of the designed general systemic methodology a collaborative study was made, called post-project analysis of the respective developing process and a synthesis of improvements were made in the continual redesign of the methodology. Consequently, the equivalent of implicit case studies was being done in order to continue the process of continuously designing and redesigning the referred methodology. Consequently, could the explicit application a chain of case studies support the design of a methodology for IRESP? Could this methodology allow the transference of successful experience in one discipline be transferred to other disciple? Could an effective methodology support a cross-cultural effective transference?
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Case Studies on Integrating Research, Education, and Real Life Problem Solving (Conversational Participatory Panel) (Part 2 of 2)
Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA; Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science; Editor of the Journal of IT Education; Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education / Dr. Suzanne Lunsford, Wright State University, USA / Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA; Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela; Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
There is a growing academic and societal need for the integration of academic activities among themselves and with Society, including private and public sectors. An increasing number of academics have noticed the importance of integrating Research, Education, and Problem Solving (IRESP) among themselves and with societal and corporate real life problems. Information and Communications Technologies enabled different ways of supporting these kinds of integration processes. Informing Science is at the heart of academic activities (research, education, and consulting).

An increasing number of specific projects showed to be effective in achieving this kind of integration. What it is probably lacking is a general methodology that can support the conception, design, and effective implementation of this kind of projects.  We strongly belief that case study methods can be applied to conceive methodologies for this kind of projects as well as for the transference of effective design and implantation of this kind of projects into other new projects in the same discipline or in any other disciplines, i.e. among different disciplinary culture. If this is true then it might also be possible to conceive a methodology for this kind of transference between different cultures and socio-economic contexts.

The objective of this conversational session is to open an inter-disciplinary and inter-cultural dialogue. Dr. Gill is a renowned scholar, practitioner, and expert in the Case Method. Dr. Suzanne Lunsford conceived and effectively implemented several specific projects in IREPS in the area of Chemistry, and Dr Nagib Callaos is also conceived and implemented IRESP projects in Information systems Development and software engineering for about 30 Years. Dr. Callaos also the conceptual co-designer of a general methodology in information systems development which process was supported by informal case studies or report after a project had been finished. After each specific application of the designed general systemic methodology a collaborative study was made, called post-project analysis of the respective developing process and a synthesis of improvements were made in the continual redesign of the methodology. Consequently, the equivalent of implicit case studies was being done in order to continue the process of continuously designing and redesigning the referred methodology. Consequently, could the explicit application a chain of case studies support the design of a methodology for IRESP? Could this methodology allow the transference of successful experience in one discipline be transferred to other disciple? Could an effective methodology support a cross-cultural effective transference?