Thumbnail1
Inter-Cultural and Inter-Disciplinary Communication (Conversational Participative Session)
Co-Facilitators: Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Doctor of Engineering and Doctor of Medicine, Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan; Professor Andres Tremante, The Mechanical & Materials Engineering (MME) Department, Florida International University, USA; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Taking into account that a discipline can be conceived as intellectual culture, is there any possibility of reciprocal learning, via analogical thinking, between studies and research in ‘Inter-Cultural Communication’ and ‘Inter-Disciplinary Communication’?” Is dialogue a necessary condition for making feasible both kind of communication? Is inter-cultural communication required for real life multiculturalism as inter-disciplinary communication is required for real life problems most of which require multi-disciplinary teams? Are skills in both kinds of communication required in Academic Globalization?
Thumbnail2
Has Informatics Changed the Intellectual Landscape? (Participatory Workshop)
Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA

Abstract

•  Have the changes in bibliographic research and research methods brought about by the internet, social media and software support for collaboration and communication been: primarily an accelerant? Deeper but largely superficial? Pervasive and substantial? If the last, in what way(s)?
•  Has collaboration become more common and/or easier due to collaborative software? Has this really changed its frequency or nature? The likelihood of interdisciplinary collaboration?
•  Has data science changed the way research is done and presented? Positively? Will development of digital humanities strengthen/save the humanities? Signal their death as a distinct mode of inquiry? Does it support or inhibit the formation of alternate models in the natural and social sciences?
•  CP Snow wrote/lectured about his perception of the growing gap between academics/researchers in the sciences and in the humanities, where many of the former looked down on the latter, and many of the latter neither grasped nor wanted to understand the former. Beyond historical accident, this was in part due to the vast gulf in terminology, idioms, concepts, patterns, practices, approaches, and philosophy, even for overlapping problems. It can be argued that mathematics and computer science/informatics have become a third equally mutually incomprehensible culture, with very different approaches and patterns of thought. To what extent is this real? If it exists, is it primarily conceptual, or due to siloing, turf protection, lack of interest, or allopatric speciation?
•  Will informatics and computing specialists serve as a bridge or translator between disciplines? A dam inhibiting or preventing progress? A priesthood or secret society with its own rituals and argot?
•  Does systems and software engineering methodology say anything useful about modeling and investigation in other disciplines? Does the requirements process in these disciplines actually communicate successfully with academic clients and experts in other areas?
•  Does informatics support, inhibit, or not affect the formation of interdisciplinary ventures, projects, teams, or research initiatives? Does it change the preparation that the non-informatics specialists should bring to the table? If so, how can we prepare academics and researchers? Have existing interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary projects helped to bridge the two-culture or three-culture gaps?
•  Given the (partial) reality of the above changes, and the growing importance of data-driven and interdisciplinary projects, we can no longer rely simply on luck, polymaths and the fortunately educated. How can we prepare conceptual map-readers, navigators, and tour guides to explore intellectual landscapes, and communicators, translators, integrators, and change managers to work with “multi-cultural” and interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary teams?
•  What do systemics, second-order cybernetics, or similar integrative disciplines have to contribute?
•  What can be done to include a broad-based philosophical, historical, ethical, multi-disciplinary and integrative perspective in the education of all academics and researchers, to minimize the effects of these problems?
•  Do women, minority and non-traditional academics/researchers have a different perception? Do they bring different mindsets and backgrounds to the table?
Thumbnail3
Has Informatics Changed the Intellectual Landscape? (Conversational Session)
Facilitator and Moderator: Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA

Abstract

•  Have the changes in bibliographic research and research methods brought about by the internet, social media and software support for collaboration and communication been: primarily an accelerant? Deeper but largely superficial? Pervasive and substantial? If the last, in what way(s)?
•  Has collaboration become more common and/or easier due to collaborative software? Has this really changed its frequency or nature? The likelihood of interdisciplinary collaboration?
•  Has data science changed the way research is done and presented? Positively? Will development of digital humanities strengthen/save the humanities? Signal their death as a distinct mode of inquiry? Does it support or inhibit the formation of alternate models in the natural and social sciences?
•  CP Snow wrote/lectured about his perception of the growing gap between academics/researchers in the sciences and in the humanities, where many of the former looked down on the latter, and many of the latter neither grasped nor wanted to understand the former. Beyond historical accident, this was in part due to the vast gulf in terminology, idioms, concepts, patterns, practices, approaches, and philosophy, even for overlapping problems. It can be argued that mathematics and computer science/informatics have become a third equally mutually incomprehensible culture, with very different approaches and patterns of thought. To what extent is this real? If it exists, is it primarily conceptual, or due to siloing, turf protection, lack of interest, or allopatric speciation?
•  Will informatics and computing specialists serve as a bridge or translator between disciplines? A dam inhibiting or preventing progress? A priesthood or secret society with its own rituals and argot?
•  Does systems and software engineering methodology say anything useful about modeling and investigation in other disciplines? Does the requirements process in these disciplines actually communicate successfully with academic clients and experts in other areas?
•  Does informatics support, inhibit, or not affect the formation of interdisciplinary ventures, projects, teams, or research initiatives? Does it change the preparation that the non-informatics specialists should bring to the table? If so, how can we prepare academics and researchers? Have existing interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary projects helped to bridge the two-culture or three-culture gaps?
•  Given the (partial) reality of the above changes, and the growing importance of data-driven and interdisciplinary projects, we can no longer rely simply on luck, polymaths and the fortunately educated. How can we prepare conceptual map-readers, navigators, and tour guides to explore intellectual landscapes, and communicators, translators, integrators, and change managers to work with “multi-cultural” and interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary teams?
•  What do systemics, second-order cybernetics, or similar integrative disciplines have to contribute?
•  What can be done to include a broad-based philosophical, historical, ethical, multi-disciplinary and integrative perspective in the education of all academics and researchers, to minimize the effects of these problems?
•  Do women, minority and non-traditional academics/researchers have a different perception? Do they bring different mindsets and backgrounds to the table?
Thumbnail4
Implementing Flipped Learning to Produce Measurable Results (Participatory Workshop)
Professor William Swart, College of Business, East Carolina University, USA / Former Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, East Carolina University, USA / Former Dean of Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract
This participatory workshop will be related the educational model name flipped classrooms of flipped learning which, in opinion of a increasing number of academics, has more educational effectiveness than other means of using ICT innovations in Education. Professor William Stuart, author of the book “Extending the Principles of Flipped Learning to Achieve Measurable Results: Emerging Research and Opportunities”, will deliver this workshop, which will be structured with the following topics:

•  What is and why consider flipped learning?
•  How to implement flipped learning?
    ⁃   Changed role of students
    ⁃   Changed role of professor
•  Measuring flipped learning results
•  Improving flipped learning results
Thumbnail5
Flipped Classroom in the context of Education and Instruction (Participatory Panel)
Panelists and Co-Facilitators: Professor William Swart, College of Business, East Carolina University, USA / Former Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, East Carolina University, USA / Former Dean of Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
When e-learning is used as a substitute of face to face learning, it certainly might increase the efficiency of teaching processes but this might be being achieved lowering the educational effectiveness. But, when e-learning is used as complement to face to face classrooms then it certainly may increase the effectiveness of the educational process. To address this issue the notions of Education and Instruction should be differentiated. Instruction might be a necessary condition of education but is it a sufficient condition? Instruction is one of the means of education which should not be confused as its end. Do all professors of higher education know the difference between both notions? How we can find professors of higher education that did not reflect enough about the real meaning of the notion of “education”? What did Albert Einstein mean affirming that “Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school.”? Is Flipped learning more educational that e-learning used as substitute of face to face classrooms?
Thumbnail6
Reinventing Academia? Why? How? (Conversational Session)
Speaker and Moderator: Dr. Ashton T. Sperry, Ronin Institute for Independent Scholarship, USA

Abstract
The tenure-track faculty position is the gold-standard for pursuing a career in scholarly research. But it is not a path that works for everyone. Higher education produces more PhDs than there are academic jobs to employ them. It is a waste of human capital. Some fields provide jobs in private industry for those with advanced degrees, but to contribute to someone else’s research. Some academics take an extended break for health reasons, to have a family, or to reassess goals. All paths have generally meant leaving academia forever. This conversational session will discuss the reasons, drawbacks, and benefits of pursuing independent scholarship, and how one can pursue independent scholarship comparable to that found in academia. The format is an open discussion among attendees.
Thumbnail7
Research and Consulting: Research via Consulting and Consulting via Research (Conversational Session)
Co-Facilitators: Dr. Faith Power, Visiting Professor of Entrepreneurship, Shenandoah University, USA / Board Service: Free Medical Clinic of the NSV, Our Health, Byrd School of Business Advisory Board, Board of Trustees (Valley Health), Board Commissioner (Virginia Port Authorit); Dr. Luis Velazquez-Araque, University of Guayaquil, Ecuador / Founder of the Aerodynamics Laboratory at National University of Tachira, Venezuela / Visiting professor at the Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Some academic areas necessarily require consulting activities or other related practicing experiences. For example, what would be the “lab” for a professor of information systems development methodologies if not information systems development in the real world? In some other academic fields, consulting activities might enrich, support, and enhance research, as it might be the case in some Engineering fields, Law, Medicine, Managements Science, Operation Research, etc. But yet, in other academic fields, consulting is perceived as an activity that might distract from what is considered proper scholarly research.In some fields or disciplines this might be true at the individual or team level.However, even in these cases scholarly research would eventually generate, via other scholars or researchers, applied research which would support real life problem solving and, consequently, the decision and policymaking processes that are part of the consulting activities. Consequently, research and consulting, directly or indirectly, immediately or not, complement and relate to each other via cybernetic co-regulative loops (negative feedback or feedforward) and co-amplificatory loops (positive feedback). These loops, in turn, may potentially produce synergic effects that: a) increase the effectiveness (and possibly the efficiency) of both kinds of activities, and/or b) generate systems/products development, innovations, entrepreneurship, patents, research papers, etc.

At the individual or team level, disciplinary research and consulting activities are not required to complement each other. However, at the organizational level in Higher Education, research and consulting activities (or real life problem solving) should be related to each other in order to integrate the organization to society at large. This is a necessary condition for legitimizing research universities, reciprocating the financial support being provided by society, and maintaining their functioning as academic organizations, not completely dedicated to instruction or education, but also to research. An increasing number of academics are, explicitly or implicitly, relating research and consulting activities to each other and, sometimes, to their educational activities. Consulting via research and doing research via consulting are both being done with more frequency, in the corporate sector as well as in the academic sector, including organizations created by (and/or in the context of) Higher Education organizations.
Thumbnail8
Driving Digital Business Value through Culture, Diversity, and Lean Agile Leadership
Dr. Robert Cherinka, Senior Principal Information Systems Engineer, MITRE Corporation, USA
Eng. Joseph Prezzama, Associate Department Head, Tampa Operations, MITRE Corporation, USA


Abstract
There is an explosion of the digital world in progress. Some examples of this disruption include cloud computing, virtual reality, sensors for Internet of Things (IoT) and Blockchain. These technologies are now becoming the new norm. The pace of digital transformation is increasing, changing, and morphing. These changes are being driven by powerful forces. Businesses are in the midst of coping with these changes. A new model is emerging to help characterize a new digital platform that goes beyond traditional information technology (IT) infrastructure. This new digital platform expands across a much broader environment to include IT Systems, IoT, customer engagement, ecosystems, and business Intelligence.

In this presentation, we will expand upon this new digital platform, highlighting some of the challenges to its adoption and its use in driving business value. We will also offer insight into setting the right culture in an organization, encouraging Bi-modal and diverse thinking, while simultaneously promoting lean agile IT leadership to assure success in this new digital world.
Thumbnail9
Multidisciplinary Learning Extends Communication Skill, and Helps Cross Cultural Understandings: Biomedical Engineering
Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Doctor of Engineering and Doctor of Medicine, Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan

Abstract
Multidisciplinary learning has been discussed in relation to cross- cultural understandings. “Biomedical engineering” is exemplified for the multidisciplinary field. “Biomedical Engineering” is the multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering, and others. Several learning programs have been tried in the biomedical engineering field: in Japan, in Thailand, and in USA.

Some of them are cross-cultural student seminars on biomedical engineering. In the group work, students are divided into the small cross-cultural groups. Each group finds a problem, methods to solve the problem, contribution to the society. Presentations are made of slides in reference to information in the internet. They have learned how to communicate with students, who has not only variety of studying backgrounds but also variety of cultural backgrounds. The training awakes in students several points: thinking from a different point of view, using various communication tools. The process extends the communication skill, and helps cross-cultural understandings.
Thumbnail10
End-to-End Security with Translation
Dr. Kevin Foltz, Information Technology and Systems Division, Institute for Defense Analyses, USA

Abstract
To communicate ideas we use standard languages, protocols, data formats, and units of measure. However, different people, machines, and software use different standards. Translators allow these different entities to communicate, but this requires them to trust the translator to properly represent and protect their information. Automated translation methods typically allow a translator to change or share a message without the knowledge of the communicating entities. Such methods deny the communicating entities basic security guarantees such as integrity and confidentiality. This talk discusses challenges and potential solutions to secure translation.
Thumbnail11
Pros and Cons of Smart ICT in Some Governmental Applications
Professor Dusan Soltes, Director of the e-Europe Research & Development Centre, Faculty of Management, Comenius University at Bratislava, Slovakia

Abstract
We will present results of our ongoing R&D started under the EU/7FP/Sec./SMART project regarding some applications of the contemporary smart ICT in selected e-government applications. Viz. e-government itself, consumer protection, border controls and protection, counter terrorism, smart surveillance in the cyberspace. The results of our particular research have been clearly showing that in addition to some evident positives and benefits as achieved by the application of the smart ICT, the same technology is very often unfortunately misused also for various clandestine activities that are violating some of the fundamental and internationally recognized human rights like e.g. right to freedom of expression, privacy, confidentiality of communications, etc. Unfortunately, in many cases these violations are made by those institutions that have to protect and guaranteeing the above FHR to all people either on the national and/or international levels.
Thumbnail12
Cyber Security for Critical Infrastructures. The New Technology Challenges.
Dr. Mario Lamanna, Evoelectronics, Italy; Selex-SI, USA

Abstract
A cyber security system for critical infrastructures needs the extensive use and the targeted application of the most modern computer and communication technologies. The implementation of such a system relies on the efficient application of these technologies to a general architecture, specifically tailored for cyber security. In order to draw the guidelines for an efficient design, both perspectives and limits of these technologies are analysed. In particular, five key technologies, namely Big Data, Intelligence, Human in the Loop, Deep Learning and Data Fusion, are described and analysed with respect to their potential application to cyber security.The results of the analysis show that, in order to design efficiently this kind of systems, a multidisciplinary approach and a strong synergy between human and machine technologies are necessary.
Thumbnail13
Living in a Digital World: Improving Skills to Meet the Challenges of Digital Transformation through Authentic and Game-Based Learning
Professor Margit Scholl, Department of Economics, Computer Science, Law, Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Germany

Abstract
The constant proliferation of digitalization is increasingly penetrating all areas of life and requires greater awareness and improved skills to handle processes based on information and communication technologies (ICT) and digital transformation (DT). In addition, the use of applications and ICT is prevalent both in private life and at work. DT itself is an ongoing process of change that not only affects individual enterprises, modern administrations, and other organizations but is also having an increasing impact on the entire (knowledge) society and all human beings.

Digital technologies and infrastructures form the basis for new digital applications, new exploitation potentials, and digital business models as well as communication in digital value-added networks. This has changed people’s communication behavior, and new knowledge is needed to deal with digital technologies, coupled with soft skills to cope with the changes triggered by digitalization. It is also necessary to foster a new awareness of the various challenges and threat scenarios of organizational and social values.

Due to shorter and shorter technology cycles, lifelong learning is taking on a new meaning. Recent research suggests that for a new sensitization to occur, a change must be made to include learner-centered, realistic, and participatory learning environments with real-world contexts. Innovative teaching and learning methods that integrate reflection, self-assessment, and performance review are needed. This brings into play cooperative learning exercises in cross-disciplinary teams drawing on authentic game-based learning approaches. The inclusion of playful elements is particularly suitable to increase motivation and encourage behavioral change.
Thumbnail14
The Future is not what it used to be: Demographics, Technology, Business and Academia in Exponential Times
Professor William Swart, College of Business, East Carolina University, USA / Former Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, East Carolina University, USA / Former Dean of Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract
Our view of the future when this conference first took place some 22 years ago bears little resemblance to the realities of today. And, surely, the world 22 years from now will bear little resemblance to what we imagine it to be today. Nevertheless, without adopting a view of the future, we will find ourselves subject to another popular saying (attributed to the hall of fame baseball player/manager Yogi Berra): “You got to be careful if you don’t know where you are going because you might not get there.”

The presentation will begin by conjuring up a vision of the future by examining current trends in globalization, demographics, and technology. It will then discuss how individuals, and businesses are evolving to respond to this changed and changing future and the challenges and opportunities that these present to academia. The presentation will then discuss how future changes and challenges are inexorably moving academic institution toward technology enhanced personalized learning – from mass dissemination of information, as in traditional lectures, to mass customization of learning, where learning coaches and consultants provide just-in-time learning only to those that need it when they need it.
Thumbnail15
Has Informatics Changed the Intellectual Landscape?
Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA

Abstract
The internet and social media, tools for collaboration and sharing and for project and data management, and an enormous and ever-increasing collection of computer-implemented techniques and algorithms have been instrumental in accelerating both research and its dissemination, as well as facilitating deeper and more sophisticated analyses of qualitative and quantitative data, although not unmixed with negative effects including plagiarism, low-quality electronic journals, and all-too-frequent credulous consumption of on-line information.

But there remain other issues, at least equally basic, to consider, affecting collaboration; the changes to the humanities, social sciences, and other fields; interdisciplinary studies; and the fundamental nature of academia, research, and pedagogy themselves. Informatics, itself a mix of science, technology and engineering, and mathematics and logic, flavored at times with economics, business, and social science, has developed terminology, idioms, concepts, patterns of use and communication, practices and approaches, theory, and philosophy of its own—a language or set of languages often incomprehensible to most outside, other than at times to some mathematicians and systems engineers.

Has informatics, perhaps in conjunction with modern mathematics, really become a third castle in CP Snow’s intellectual landscape, determined to be pristinely separated from the humanities and social sciences on the one hand, and the sciences and engineering on the other? If so, is this a result primarily of siloing, turf protection, and lack of interest in crossing the ground between them? Or is it true allopatric speciation—the birth of a new intellectual genus as a result of separation and evolution, and inherently structural and conceptual?

Regardless, large, complex and long-lived ventures are increasingly likely to be able to benefit from approaches common to informatics, including but not limited to modern, agile versions of requirements, specification, and design. Communication between technical personnel and the (in the broad sense) clients using their services is likely to require mapping and translation. Interdisciplinary teams, which increasingly require or are even dominated by an informatics component, may require not only specialists in each area, but collaborators who are comfortable with exploration, mapping, translation, integration, and the presentation of multiple views and narrations. Interdisciplinary projects and enterprises will no longer be able to rely on luck, polymaths and those fortunate to have a matching education.

For this reason, consider the informatics component of interdisciplinary education, or for that matter, of education in general. Is it sufficient to concentrate on discipline- or purpose-specific useful approaches, tools and techniques? Or should one seek to convey the informatics mindset(s), worldview(s), and conceptual understanding(s)? Can the proposed workforce of intermediaries and their managers be created without such understanding?

And to what extent does this fit with a broad-based integrative perspective in the education of all academics and researchers, including informaticians, computer scientists, and software engineers? What do systemics, second-order cybernetics, or similar integrative disciplines have to contribute? And how can we incorporate the perspectives of populations with different demographic, academic, and experiential backgrounds and focus both at the table and in the field?
Thumbnail16
Psychotherapy via the Internet as a Novel Tool for Clinical Use
Professor Dr. Dr. med. Ulrich Sprick, St. Alexius - St. Josef Clinic, Germany / Chief Physician / Psychiatry and Psychotherapy

Abstract
An increasing amount of patients with prolonged waiting times or difficulties to get admittance to the health system has enforced the number of internet-based psychotherapy treatments in many countries. There is a wide range of solutions ranging from self-help to guided or therapist-delivered versions. Advantages and disadvantages of the different treatment approaches will be highlighted. Completer rates and effects of different e-health treatments will be compared with face to face treatments. Additionally different quality parameters of internet-based psychotherapy will be focused.
Thumbnail17
Using Constructivism Learning With Bloom’s Cognitive and Affective Domains, and Mental Mind Structures to Implement Contextualized Critical Thinking in Both Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Studies
Dr. Matthew E. Edwards, Professor of Physics, Alabama A&M University, USA / Former Dean, School of Arts and Sciences, Alabama A&M University, USA

Abstract
In academia, the benefits of Contextualized Critical Thinking occur effortlessly for a large segment of students. However, the rewards of critical thinking develop slowly, if at all for the remaining segment. The onset of cognitive thinking begins with simple memorizing, recording, valuing, comparing, and contrasting events, or situations—using the early categories of Bloom’s cognitive and affective domains. Once contextualization and advanced components of Bloom’s domains are added, the able-minded students, using constructivism with “mental mind structures,” without even thinking of them, develop a knack for critical thinking while other students remain languishing in states of inaptness. To that extent, we have developed mnemonics, acronyms, and other mental patterns, such as what we call “mental hooks,” “mental straights” and “mental S’s” to assist students in learning. All students, including the able-minded ones and the struggling groups, can benefit from these techniques in both disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies.
Thumbnail18
i-Science 2.0: Digital Literacies, eLearning and Digital Technologies for Higher Education Studies of Science
Dr. Anthea Fudge, Course Coordinator of Science for Tertiary Learning Blended Learning/Digital Technologies upon the Delivery of Science, University of South Australia, Australia

Abstract
The world has changed; moving from an information age to a conceptual age with digital technologies at the forefront. Technology has shifted the ways educators teach and students learn. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education courses prepare students with important scientific knowledge and skills in addition to a wider context of developing ever important digital literacies in this online world.

A challenge arising from technological advancement is for educators to prepare students for hypothetical jobs in future industries. Science students need 21st Century skills to evaluate academic resources and effectively use digital technologies. Students are increasingly digital natives but are not always experts in the use of technology.

The increased use of digital media in higher education provides opportunities for students to further their engagement with complex tasks. Reflective practice over a five year iteration of a science course from various feedback and evaluation measures ensured interventions were made embedding digital literacies into the course, not as an add-on to scientific knowledge but as part of being a problem solver and supporting digital literacies. A multifaceted approach was taken to embed different digital technologies within the science course in a meaningful way bound by learning theories and employing technologies including; tailored digital video content related to science laboratory safety and experiments, virtual classroom sessions providing feedback and clarification wherever the student was located, incorporating blended learning techniques in tutorials, building digital literacies with online library sessions covering search strategies and critical analysis techniques of resources, course analytics monitoring student engagement and access, online learning management systems, and bring your own device (BYOD) technology encouraged collaboration within a classroom allowing the learner and educator to gain instant feedback using the technology and analytics ensuring students are able to engage with complex research problems presented. Results of internal and external students learning progress, engagement and confidence will be discussed.

Educators must be willing to embrace digital learning and model an inquiring attitude with students to best prepare them for the inevitable technology developments to come.
Thumbnail19
Use of Technology for Research and Pedagogical Purposes in STEM (Science- Technology- Engineering- Mathematics) Education
Professor Louis Trudel, Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa, Canada

Abstract
In this presentation, we will first examine the various functions technology can play in STEM education, as well its advantages and limits. Indeed, STEM classroom has not escaped the digital revolution. In the laboratory, computers and probes allow quick and easy data collection and analysis, so students can test their hypothesis, and variations of it, within the time limits of the school curriculum. Aside this technical prowess, a new generation of software aims to integrate the principles of knowledge construction into an integrated approach enabling the student to actively participate in his own learning. In teacher training, software helps student teachers to design pedagogical scenarios that can be later commented upon and evaluated by practicing teachers, opening the door to continuous teacher professional development. As a conclusion, we plead, in order to benefit from these various contributions, for a continuous interaction through research between the development of technological tools and their pedagogical use in STEM education.
Thumbnail20
Flourishing Organizations
Dr. Maria Jakubik, Head of Master's Degree, Programme in International Business Management (IBMA), Hanken School of Economics, Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences, Finland

Abstract
Organizations are living open systems created and developed by people. Appreciative inquiry (AI) changes the attention from problem solving to developing organizations based on their strengths. The life-giving forces (LGFs) of 29 organizations in Finland were determined during a four-year period of research. Data were collected and analysed qualitatively by groups of Master’s students. Altogether 319 interviews were conducted by asking ‘unconditional positive questions’. Discovering what provides joy and happiness for people in work serves as a strong basis for them to dream, design and achieve their own and their organization’s destiny in the future.
Thumbnail21
CHAOS Update, Nanocourses, the Winning Hand, and the Root Cause of IT Project Failure
Mr. Jim Johnson, Founder and Chairman, The Standish Group, USA

Abstract
Last year at WMSCI 2016, Jim Johnson and Hans Mulder outlined the new CHAOS University System, which is a partnership with The Standish Group, University of Antwerp, and the Antwerp Management School. This year Jim Johnson will outline the progress to date and future planned efforts. A major feature of forthcoming programs will focus on nanocourses and lifelong learning events. The second part of the talk will spotlight new discoveries. Using the CHAOS Database, we found the root causes of most project success and value.

In the session, we will explore:
  • CHAOS University progress
  • Nanocourses and lifelong learning events
  • The Winning Hand
  • Marginal PM activities
  • Root cause of project success and value
Thumbnail22
Toward an Interdisciplinary Approach to STEM Education: Insights from Seton Hall University’s Core Curriculum
Fr. Dr. Joseph Laracy, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, College of Arts and Sciences, Seton Hall University, USA

Abstract
Many academics are familiar with the term 'silo effect,' in reference to the growing tendency of disciplinary isolation both in research and teaching. 'Siloing' is noted particularly in the formal, natural, and applied sciences. Yet, many areas of human inquiry require by their very nature, an interdisciplinary approach. At Seton Hall University, in the context of the Core Curriculum for undergraduate studies, serious efforts are underway to bring the sciences into dialogue with the wider Catholic intellectual tradition. By fostering a healthy exchange between philosophy, theology, mathematics, computing, and the natural sciences, upperclassmen have been able to explore topics of great personal interest and draw significant connections from content learned in diverse fields of their education. Opportunities exist to extend and adapt this approach to other university settings internationally.
Thumbnail23
Methodologies that Promote Cross-Disciplinary Education
Dr. Giti Javidi, Department of Information Technology, University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee, USA

Abstract
The purpose of this talk is to present the idea that cross-disciplinary education in STEM and Entrepreneurship as a new trend in education has the potential to equip students with the necessary skills for solving multidisciplinary problems. STEM graduates should not only possess technical, but also social, cultural and entrepreneurship skills like innovation, creativity, teamwork and leadership. These new profiles compose the 21st century skills and cannot be developed with the traditional methodologies. STEM disciplines have inherent limitations that need to be corrected by the presence of disciplines such as social entrepreneurship to help STEM students become prepared for solving multi-disciplinary social and global issues.
Thumbnail24
Las Prácticas Profesionales del Investigador Educativo: Paradojas y Utopías
Dra. María Dolores García Perea, Investigadora en Educación, Instituto Superior de Ciencias de la Educación del Estado de México, México

Abstract
Las prácticas profesionales desarrolladas por el investigador educativo al interior y exterior de la institución donde labora, están determinadas principalmente por el espíritu de la época, es decir, por el clima intelectual, cultural, económico, político, etc., que caracteriza a la sociedad en un periodo histórico específico.

Para analizar, entonces, las prácticas profesionales realizadas por este actor educativo mexicano en dos momentos coyunturales distintos y valorar, por un lado, su pertinencia y acorde a la época que le tocó vivir, por otro, el carácter paradójico y utópico de su asignación y desarrollo, se hace un recorrido por dos tipos de sociedades (industrial y post-industrial) con la finalidad de identificar el espíritu de la época que caracteriza a dichos momentos coyunturales.
También se describen los aspectos que constituyen la presencia y autoridad de este actor educativo en el sistema educativo mexicano.

Se incluye la relación de prácticas profesionales privilegiadas y recomendadas por los investigadores educativos cuya trayectoria es reconocida en el ámbito nacional mexicano así como de aquellos que la desarrollan de manera cotidiana, sin olvidar las que se incrementan debido a la presencia del internet y de las herramientas tecnológicas aplicadas a la educación, con el propósito de valorar los alcances, impacto, retos y obstáculos.

Por último, a partir de experiencias personales y narradas por algunos investigadores educativos elegidos con base en criterios específicos, se explican los componentes, ámbitos, estructura y radio de acción que caracterizan las prácticas profesionales que desarrollan y se valora su estatus paradójico y utópico así como las circunstancias de los éxitos logrados.
Thumbnail25
Integração de Ensino, Pesquisa e Solução de Problema da Vida Real: Uma Experiência em Andamento na Região do Vale do Mucuri (Brasil)
Dr. Leônidas Conceição Barroso, Faculdade de Ciências Empresarias, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais, Brasil

Abstract
Descreve-se umprojeto interdisciplinar que procura integrar ensino, pesquisa e solução de problema da vida real. Trata-se de buscar respostas para a pergunta: como atingir o desenvolvimento da região do Vale do Mucuri (nos estados de Minas Gerais e Bahia, Brasil), respeitandoseus recursos naturais. A Geografia é utilizada como eixonorteador, tendo como suporte tecnológico os Sistemas de Informação Geográfica para os diálogos interdisciplinares, de forma a integrar dados, informações, técnicas, métodos e pessoas de diferentes campos do conhecimento.
Thumbnail26
Gamificación del Aprendizaje. Una estrategia para Potenciar la Innovación en Educación Médica
Dr. Julio César González Mariño, Facultad de Medicina e Ingeniería Sistemas Computacionales, Universidad  Autónoma de Tamaulipas, México

Abstract
Gamificación es el término utilizado para referirse a la implementación de mecánicas, dinámicas y otros elementos del diseño de videojuegos, en actividades no lúdicas. Con el fin de aumentar la motivación intrínseca, la concentración y el compromiso del usuario, por realizar una actividad que de otro modo le resultaría tediosa y aburrida.

La gamificación se ha estado implementando con éxito, como una poderosa herramienta para lograr cambios de comportamiento y actitud en los usuarios, en ámbitos como la psicología, los negocios, la industria del software, mercadotecnia, TV entre otros. Se prevé que continúe utilizándose mucho más en las empresas en el corto plazo.

En educación médica existen altos índices de fracaso y deserción durante el primer año, por problemas asociados a la complejidad de los contenidos y a la forma tradicional como son abordados por los profesores. El estudiante pierde la motivación al fallar en las primeras evaluaciones parciales y al no encontrar otra alternativa de estudio, abandona o no concluye el curso con éxito. Implementando un proceso de gamificación del aprendizaje, es posible contribuir a la resolución de esta problemática y potenciar la innovación en educación médica.

Esta ponencia describe, una propuesta para implementar un proceso de gamificación del aprendizaje de la anatomía cardiovascular. Con el diseño de modelos 3D del sistema cardiovascular y el desarrollo de un software que integre en su diseño, dinámicas y mecánicas de los videojuegos. De manera que, detone en el estudiante la motivación intrínseca por permanecer interactuando con los contenidos, como lo haría disfrutando con su videojuego favorito.
Thumbnail27
Modelos de Aprendizaje Híbridos para la Intervención con Menores en Riesgo de Exclusión Social
Dra. Eva María Olmedo Moreno, Directora del Departamento de Métodos de Investigación y Diagnóstico en Educación, Universidad de Granada, España

Abstract
El proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje de los estudiantes se encuentra establecido por las herramientas, fuentes de información, conexiones y actividades que cada individuo utiliza para su propia formación. Estos han sido denominados como Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje (PLE) (Brown, 2010). Desde el principio, los estudios sobre los PLE coinciden en tener entre sus principales conclusiones, que el uso de las herramientas convierte a los estudiantes en seres autónomos y con mayor capacidad para tomar decisiones (Tait, 1999), además de facilitar su integración académica y social como consecuencia de la participación en comunidades de aprendizajes de diferentes tipos (Wenger, 2006; Salinas, 2008).

Las Ciencias Sociales y las Humanidades se erigen necesarias para dar respuesta a estos retos, y en concreto, las Ciencias de la Educación tienen la gran responsabilidad de impulsar Modelos de Aprendizaje Híbridos ajustados a los modos de relación, escenarios de aprendizaje insertos en el PLE de cada menor con riesgo de exclusión social. Ya que de esto depende no solo su autoeficacia escolar, sino el nivel de integración social y, consecuentemente, la construcción del modelo de ciudadanía.