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Planning for Action Research: Looking at Practice through a Different Lens
Dr. Heidi Ann Hahn, Director of the Engineering Capability Development, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA / Past President of the International Council of Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Enchantment Chapter

Abstract
It has been my experience that behavioral science practitioners, including myself, often "back into" action research. That is, we start out doing a process improvement or intervention and discover something along the way, i.e., generalizable knowledge, which seems worthwhile to share with our community of practice. What if, instead of looking at these projects from the point of view of practitioners, we looked at them as research from the outset? Would that change the outcome or generate additional knowledge? This talk will compare and contrast process improvement and action research methods, and will illustrate how use of a research "lens" can enhance behavioral science interventions and the knowledge that may result from them.
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A Case for Building an Interdisciplinary Health Research Academy: Opportunities for Interdisciplinary and Cross-Sector Partnerships in Health Research
Professor Katharina Kovacs Burns, University of Alberta, Canada / Associate Director, Interdisciplinary Health Research Academy Health Sciences Council

Abstract
Health research is complex and challenging to do effectively, comprehensively and with rigour. It requires an interdisciplinary and cross-sector team approach, with adequate supports. Ideas were explored in the literature, through surveys and strategic planning exercises, resulting in the establishment of the Interdisciplinary Health Research Academy supported by the University of Alberta. To provide spaces, opportunities and resources for diverse stakeholders to connect and interact on common health research interests is what IHRA’s infrastructure does; to bridge different perspectives on health issues and have diverse research teams collaborate to investigate answers to those complex issues is what IHRA facilitates and supports.
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A Comprehensive model of Risk Assessment and Management
Professor Mario Norbis, School of Business, Quinnipiac University, USA

Abstract
Increasing economic uncertainty, demand instability, and supply interruption from natural and man-made disasters have intensified the frequency and magnitude of risks and the complexities of managerial decisions. In this keynote address we will describe the development of a comprehensive model of risk that considers the vulnerability associated with individual risk elements and the risk interactions which may intensify or attenuate individual risk levels. A Supply chain will be used as an example to illustrate the proposed model.
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A way to Integrate Teaching, Research and Consulting
Dr. Rahul Bedi, System Associate Chair of the Department of Management, Berkeley College, USA, and Dr. Darshan Deseai, Berkeley College, USA

Abstract
Despite the existence of a range of integration opportunities, a dominant perspective in higher education suggests that teaching, research and professional services often clash and or fail to connect in the student and faculty experiences. We describe an approach – inquiry based service learning – that facilitates integration of teaching, research, and consulting through engaging all three important stakeholders (instructor, students, and community NGOs) services towards the common goal of solving the real life problems/issues faced by community partners.  We present examples and potential applications of this approach in a variety of contexts.
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Participatory Conversational Workshop on the Weaknesses and Potential Solutions to Peer Reviewing (Part 1/2)
Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA

Abstract
Everyone talks about peer review, but articles like the one Carl Zimmer published in the 16 April 2012 of the New York Times keep appearing. There are an increasing number of cases of papers being retracted because of everything from poor quality to fraud. If this trend isn't reversed soon, we could be living in an age where published information simply isn't reliable. This presentation summarizes what is involved in peer review, the problems encountered in the process, some reasons for poor peer review, and some solutions.
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Participatory Conversational Workshop on the Weaknesses and Potential Solutions to Peer Reviewing (Part 2/2)
Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA

Abstract
Everyone talks about peer review, but articles like the one Carl Zimmer published in the 16 April 2012 of the New York Times keep appearing. There are an increasing number of cases of papers being retracted because of everything from poor quality to fraud. If this trend isn't reversed soon, we could be living in an age where published information simply isn't reliable. This presentation summarizes what is involved in peer review, the problems encountered in the process, some reasons for poor peer review, and some solutions.
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Dimensionalities of Knowledge Discovery using Data, Text and Web Mining
Professor Richard S. Segall, Department of Computer & Information Technology, College of Business, Arkansas State University, USA

Abstract
This talk will summarize research of Dr. Segall that pertains to knowledge discovery obtained with the applications of data, text and web mining. Data/Text/Web mining is the informatics methodology and systemics study of finding hidden patterns in large-scale sets of alphanumeric data/text/web respectively.

This presentation will discuss the applications of data mining to the dimensionality of micro-array databases. Micro-arrays are huge collections of spots that contain massive amounts of compressed data. Micro-arrays are used by researchers in life sciences for genetics because DNA contains so much information on a micro-scale. For example, each spot of a micro-array thus could contain a unique DNA sequence. This research has also been extended to include statistical quality control of microarray gene expression data. This presentation will also discuss the applications of text and web mining to linkage discovery of related documents in a repository and the use of semantic rules for identification of similar records. The results of using web mining technologies for customer and marketing surveys are also discussed.
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Cross-Cultural Student Seminar for Communication Training in Multidisciplinary Field
Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan

Abstract
Misunderstanding often occurs in multidisciplinary field, because each field has its own background of thinking.  Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop multidisciplinary field.  Because each nation has its own cultural background, communication in an international seminar is not easy, either.  A cross-cultural student seminar has been designed for communication training in multidisciplinary field of study.  Students from variety of background have joined in the seminar.  Equations and figures are effective tools for communication in the field of science.

The seminar works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study of biomedical engineering.
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The New Science of Cybernetics (NSC): Goals, Modes and Cognitive Gains
Dr. Karl Müller, University of Vienna, Austria / Head of The Wiener Institute for Social Science Documentation: WISDOM / President of the Heinz von Foerster Society

Abstract
The presentation will be focused on the new science of cybernetics (NSC) which has been developed in two volumes over the last years. The new science of cybernetics can be viewed as a transformation of Heinz von Foerster’s vision of second-order cybernetics and can be described as a science of self-reflexivity or as a science of living systems by living systems for living systems.

The talk will start with the main differences between two stages in the evolution of science which have been labeled as Science I and Science II. Science I corresponds to the organization of science from its initial modern phase in the 16th century to the 1940s and 1950s approximately. Science I is the long-term period of majestic clockworks, culminating at an early stage in the “Principia Mathematica” of Sir Isaac Newton in 1687. In contrast, Science II operates with blind watchmakers (Richard Dawkins) or, to use another metaphor from Karl R. Popper, works in a configuration of clouds.

The major part of the presentation will be centered on three areas.
  • First, the lecture wants to provide a short general historical account on the co-evolution of three different layers of scientific research at the first-order, the zero-order and the second-order level.
  • Second, the presentation will offer an overview on the three different modes of the new science and cybernetics (NSC) and their current cognitive potentials.
  • Finally, the lecture will point out the major differences between first-order cybernetics as a transdisciplinary first-order research field and second-order cybernetics as a transdisciplinary domain at the second-order level.
Relevant Literature:

Müller, K.H. (2008), The New Science of Cybernetics. The Evolution of Living Research Designs, vol. I: Methodology. Wien:edition echoraum
Müller, K.H. (2011), The New Science of Cybernetics. The Evolution of Living Research Designs, vol. II: Theory. Wien:edition echoraum
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Workshop on Integrative Potential of Case Studies and Methodologies
(Part 1/2)

Professor T. Grandon Gill, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA

Abstract
This workshop will introduce participants to Case Studies and Method by showing the possibilities they generate for the Integration of Academic Activities

A mix of presentation, exercises and discussion, the topics to be covered will include:

- What is the case method?
- Different types of case study and how they are used
- Steps in developing authentic case studies: from recruiting sites to publication
- Facilitating case discussions in the classroom
- Measuring case method learning outcomes
- Publishing case studies
- Opportunities for funding case method projects
- Broader impacts of case method on the individual and institution
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Workshop on Integrative Potential of Case Studies and Methodologies
(Part 2/2)

Professor T. Grandon Gill, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA

Abstract
This workshop will introduce participants to Case Studies and Method by showing the possibilities they generate for the Integration of Academic Activities

A mix of presentation, exercises and discussion, the topics to be covered will include:

- What is the case method?
- Different types of case study and how they are used
- Steps in developing authentic case studies: from recruiting sites to publication
- Facilitating case discussions in the classroom
- Measuring case method learning outcomes
- Publishing case studies
- Opportunities for funding case method projects
- Broader impacts of case method on the individual and institution
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Fostering Partnerships between Industry and Academia to promote Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education
Dr. Robert Cherinka, Senior Principal Information Systems Engineer, The MITRE Corporation, USA
Mr. J. Paul Wahnish, President and Founder of Career Technical Education Foundation, The MITRE Corporation, USA, and Eng. Joseph Prezzama, Lead Communications Engineer and Leads the program in support of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), The MITRE Corporation, USA


Abstract
There is a growing concern in the United States regarding the declining state of education and college enrollment for degrees in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). As part of a STEM Outreach program, MITRE is partnering with the Career Technical Education Foundation (CTEF) to take an active role working to encourage school districts to seek out and take advantage of opportunities for their students to learn and apply STEM-related constructs and emerging technologies in a contextually relevant setting. A sustainable model for fostering partnerships between Industry and Academia is presented.
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Communicative Praxis in the Age of Globalization
Dr. Marta S. White, Director of the Robinson Honors Program and the Robinson Business Learning Community and Program Director of the Study Abroad in Transition Economies and the Business Mediterranean Style, Georgia State University, USA

Abstract
The winner of the 2012 JIBS [Journal of International Business Studies] Decade Award is Professor Keith Brouthers, for his 2002 article "Institutional, Cultural and Transaction Cost Influences on Entry Mode Choice and Performance". This seminal scholarship underscores entry mode selection as modified by three variables: transaction cost, institutional context, and cultural context, as measured by market potential and investment risk. The two cultural context variables examine: (1) profit conversion/repatriation risks, (2) nationalization risks, (3) cultural similarity, and (4) political, social, and economic conditions.

This keynote address proposes adding within-culture communication styles to broaden cultural context by employing the LMR [Linear-active, Multi-active, and Reactive] framework.
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Reflecting between Understanding and Acting
Professor Ranulph Glanville, The Royal College of Art, UK / RMIT University, Australia / President of The American Society for Cybernetics

Abstract
We live by a model that tells us we should understand in order to act. Yet babies do the opposite: they act in order to understand. This is the key lesson that Piaget taught us. In a more recent cybernetic interpretation, acting and understanding form a mutually dependant circularity. What is important is what happens between them (their interaction) within the mind of the agent who acts and understands. I argue this is powered by reflection, i.e., deep, contemplative thinking. I will explore how this relates to Behaviours in my own Theory of Objects; von Foerster’s recursive eigen forms; and Schoen’s reflection in action. Finally, I will bring these ideas towards Umpleby’s account of Soros’ reflexive economics.
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Collaborative Enterprises: Why is knowledge like an iceberg?
Dr. Susu Nousala, Aalto University, Finland / Researcher in sustainable design, and Research Fellow at the (Australasian Centre for the Governance and Management of Urban Transport) Faculty of Architecture- Buildi

Abstract
The tip of the iceberg" is a useful phrase when describing the obvious with a vast and unknown element attached. Structures or entities such as societies, cities and regions are visible and obvious on the surface but are also vast unknown interactions of individuals and their knowledge networks operating continuously, on multiple scales (scalable adaptive complex systems). These systems and their knowledge networks have not always been clearly understood or received the attention they deserve. When considering the vast variety of perturbations that impact the daily dynamics through to design for cities and regions, the how and why of these adaptive complex systems really is the tip of the iceberg. The basis for new methodological approaches are emerging, reflecting the demands of dynamic analysis of field work and the like, including reflection of the evolving living systems - the knowledge networks of the unknown.
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Collaborative Enterprises: Enterprise IT as Knowledge Keeper
Dr. Ruth Bergman, Director, Hewlett Packard Labs, Israel

Abstract
Due to IT Automation and Cloud delivery, services provided by tomorrow’s Enterprise IT department shall shift from managing devices and applications to knowledge services. By taking on responsibility as keeper and courier of organizational knowledge, IT departments will remain mission critical. This talk will delve into challenges and innovation necessary on the path to this transformation.
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Collaborative Enterprises: Everything Old is New Again
Professor Thomas Marlowe, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA

Abstract
Re-examining solved problems—when is it necessary?  Desirable?  Counterproductive?  This question lies at the basis of cyclical, spiral, and incremental approaches to management, knowledge discovery, and product development and maintenance.  In a mildly humorous overview, we consider triggers and tradeoffs, and the complications arising from hard problems, knowledge-intensive domains, and collaboration. In this keynote address solved problem will be revisited—causes, costs, benefits, tradeoffs and triggers, with emphasis on complex problems, collaboration and software development.