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Disciplinary Research is a Necessary Condition for Science Advancement but it is not a Sufficient Condition for Real Life Problem Solving and Technological Innovations, because in these cases Interdisciplinary Research and Communication are also Necessary - Is this affirmation correct? Why? (Conversational Participative Session) (Part 1 of 2)
Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA, and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
The main purpose of this Conversational Participative Session is to support an open forum with regards to the Systemic-Cybernetic relationships between disciplinary research and inter-disciplinary communications and/research. The inputs to this conversational session are some questions related to the following affirmation:

Disciplinary Research is a Necessary Condition for Science Advancement but it is not a Sufficient Condition for Real Life Problem Solving and Technological Innovations, because in these cases Interdisciplinary Research and Communication are also Necessary

Examples of the associated questions are the following (other questions might be raised by the audience):

  • Is this affirmation right?
  • If not, Why?
  • If yes, Why?
  • What are the implicit and/or explicit relationships between Science and Engineering, real life problem solving, and technological innovations?
  • Do the following systemic-cybernetic relationships make any sense to you? If not why?
  • Is there any association between Academic Ethos, Pathos, and Logos and relating explicitly disciplinary research and interdisciplinary communication and research?

  • Information, knowledge (epiteme) and opinion (doxa) sharing would provide input to the attendees of this session so they feel enabled to write reflection-based or practice-based position “invited papers”, which will be included in the post-conference edition of the conference proceedings with no additional costs for the respective authors. The best of these papers will also be published in the Journal with no additional cost for the respective author. These papers will be distinguished as “invited papers” or “position papers”.
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    Disciplinary Research is a Necessary Condition for Science Advancement but it is not a Sufficient Condition for Real Life Problem Solving and Technological Innovations, because in these cases Interdisciplinary Research and Communication are also Necessary - Is this affirmation correct? Why? (Conversational Participative Session) (Part 2 of 2)
    Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA, and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

    Abstract
    The main purpose of this Conversational Participative Session is to support an open forum with regards to the Systemic-Cybernetic relationships between disciplinary research and inter-disciplinary communications and/research. The inputs to this conversational session are some questions related to the following affirmation:

    Disciplinary Research is a Necessary Condition for Science Advancement but it is not a Sufficient Condition for Real Life Problem Solving and Technological Innovations, because in these cases Interdisciplinary Research and Communication are also Necessary

    Examples of the associated questions are the following (other questions might be raised by the audience):

  • Is this affirmation right?
  • If not, Why?
  • If yes, Why?
  • What are the implicit and/or explicit relationships between Science and Engineering, real life problem solving, and technological innovations?
  • Do the following systemic-cybernetic relationships make any sense to you? If not why?
  • Is there any association between Academic Ethos, Pathos, and Logos and relating explicitly disciplinary research and interdisciplinary communication and research?

  • Information, knowledge (epiteme) and opinion (doxa) sharing would provide input to the attendees of this session so they feel enabled to write reflection-based or practice-based position “invited papers”, which will be included in the post-conference edition of the conference proceedings with no additional costs for the respective authors. The best of these papers will also be published in the Journal with no additional cost for the respective author. These papers will be distinguished as “invited papers” or “position papers”.
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    Academic Globalization (Plenary Workshop)
    Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, The George Washington University, USA

    Abstract
    In a two hours workshop we shall review where we are in the process of creating a worldwide, networked university system.  Several factors are driving the rapid growth and improvement of the Global University System – the internet, big data, data analytics, and an expansion of philosophy of science.

    We shall use a conversational method called Appreciative Inquiry.  Each participant will answer a question using note cards.  The cards will be placed on a board, clustered and discussed.  Then participants will answer a second question.  This method gives everyone an opportunity to participate.  The questions we shall address, if time permits, are:  What is working now?  Why is it working?  What is our vision of the future?  What actions would be helpful?

    For results of an earlier discussion using a similar method, see http://www.gwu.edu/~umpleby/papers/2007_WMSCI_PSP_academic_globalization_6-1.doc.
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    “Toward Integral, Integrative and Integrated Academic Activities.“ - Is this important? Is it necessary? Is it a cybernetic-systemic perspective of academic activities? (Conversational Participative Session)
    Co-Chairs and Facilitators: Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, The George Washington University, USA; Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, Northeastern University, USA / Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, USA, and Principal Research Scientist at The Air Force Research Laboratory, USA; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

    Abstract
    The objective of this conversational session is oriented to elicit information and practice-based opinions and reflections as input for future more detailed and more formalized articles. These new versions might be worked out by interested individuals or groups via collaborative processes.

    Parts of the potentially generated articles might also produce spin off of individual or collaborative (informal or more formal) articles. Another objective of this session is to explore the desirability and feasibility of founding and organizing an International Association for an Integral, Integrated, and Integrative Academy (IIIA)
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    How to Learn Multidisciplinary Ideas
    Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Doctor of Engineering and Doctor of Medicine, Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan

    Abstract
    The way how to learn multidisciplinary idea will be discussed.

    Biomedical engineering is exemplified for multidisciplinary field. “Biomedical Engineering” makes multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering and others.  The cross-cultural student seminars on biomedical engineering have been exemplified as the case studies.  In the group fieldwork, students divided into the small group.  Each group visited the university hospital to find research topics related to biomedical engineering as the fieldwork by the cross cultural group.  Students pointed out several topics related to multidisciplinary field, which includes mechanics, informatics, and systemics.  They have learned how to communicate with people, who has variety of cultural backgrounds.  Through the training, students realized another way of thinking, which stands on another base of idea.  The process is effective to master multidisciplinary idea.

    The World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI) gives good opportunity to learn multidisciplinary idea, because it welcomes not only variety of special fields of study, but also variety of researchers from variety of cultural backgrounds.  Many academic conferences are concentrated into special field so that the number of participating countries is limited.  Although the specialized group is convenient for peer review, it is not almighty for the global society.  The global society consists of variety of elements.  The single discipline is not enough for the application to the global society.  Multidisciplinary idea breaks through the global problem, and creates innovation.
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    A Global Strategy for Human Development as an Example of Second Order Science
    Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, The George Washington University, USA

    Abstract
    In the 1960s the Institute of Cultural Affairs, based in Chicago, Illinois, started working with poor communities, helping people come together to work for positive change.  They developed some very useful methods for facilitating group conversations.  They used these in poor communities around the world.  They would come together each summer to discuss what worked and what did not.  They would modify their methods, plan the next year's activities, implement the activities, then come together the following summer to discuss what worked, etc.  Academics do something similar with annual conferences, but they are more focused on publishing academic articles than on improving the lives of real people in real communities.  For examples of such conversational exercises, see www.gwu.edu/~umpleby/ptp.html

    Part of the motivation for defining and creating second order science is to recognize and increase innovative, problem-solving oriented social actions, often conducted by Non-Governmental Organizations.  Currently universities have large numbers of students and faculty members seeking to advance knowledge in the social sciences, using a conception of social science taken from the physical sciences.  But social systems are composed of purposeful, thinking participants, not inanimate objects.  Perhaps in addition to searching for reliable cause and effect relationships part of what is called social science could be devoted to developing conversational methods that aid joint action toward shared goals.  If this goal were be accepted within the social sciences in universities there would be a great increase in the number of people working to improve social systems and developing more effective conversational methods.
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    Aesthetic Emotions and Informatics
    Dr. Leonid Perlovsky, Northeastern University, USA / Previously Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, USA, and Principal Research Scientist at The Air Force Research Laboratory, USA

    Abstract
    Among fundamental principles of cognition are instincts, concepts, and emotions. Whereas concepts are mental models of reality, emotions evaluate concepts for instinct satisfaction. Cognitive principles governing informatics include the instinct for knowledge driving acquisition of better concepts. Emotions related to this instinct are aesthetic emotions. Informatics and communication require integration of conceptual and emotional mechanisms.

    Concepts and aesthetic emotions are organized into the hierarchy. At lower levels of perception, concepts are neural models of objects, and aesthetic emotions are mostly below the level of consciousness. At higher levels of abstract concepts aesthetic emotions are accessible to consciousness. Cognitive concepts at every level of the hierarchy unify lower-level concepts into more general and abstract concepts. Near the "top" of the hierarchy concepts attempt to unify the entire life experience. These concepts attempting to understand the entire life in its unity we perceive as the meaning of life. The KI strives to improve these concepts, and aesthetic emotions corresponding to these improvements are emotions of the beautiful. The KI also strives to make the beautiful a part of our life, in other words the KI improves concepts of behavior unifying the life's meaning. Aesthetic emotions corresponding to improvement of these "highest" concepts of behavior are emotions of the sublime, the foundations of all religions.

    Discussions of these concepts near the top of the hierarchy are complicated due to the fact that contents of these concepts are not accessible to consciousness. We can discuss these concepts in language, which is accessible to consciousness at all hierarchical levels. Language is accessible to consciousness because language concepts (words, phrases) exist "ready-made" in the surrounding culture and language. But cognitive concepts do not exist "ready-made" in the world. The fundamental difference between language and cognitive concepts is that language concepts only concern facts of language, but they do not concern facts of the world, whereas cognitive concepts model the world. For this reason children can speak and understand language without fully understanding the cognitive meanings of the world. The difference between children and adults in understanding language is that adults also understand cognitive concepts and can relate words to the world. Children's ability to relate words to the world is limited. The mental hierarchy is really the dual hierarchy of cognition and language. The ability for the cognitive hierarchy is due to language, which become conscious at an early age. During growing up language supports development of cognition, which connects human understanding to the world.

    Thinking moves smoothly between language and cognition, and these transitions are not noticed by consciousness. Abstract concepts at higher levels of the mental hierarchy usually are understood due to language, people can discuss their contents in words, whereas the real meanings of abstract concepts, the corresponding processes in the world and mind may not be accessible to consciousness. Connecting knowledge to entities in the world requires unifying concepts and emotions. This integration of knowledge and aesthetic emotions is accomplished with the help of music and prosodial emotions of speech.

    Thus informatics understood as communicating knowledge in its interaction with the world requires integrating knowledge with aesthetic emotions, including the beautiful, prosodial emotions in language, and music.
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    De profundis. Ranulph Glanville's Approach to Second-Order Cybernetics. (Memorial Lecture)
    Dr. Karl H. Müller, Director of The Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics, Vienna, Austria / Professor at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

    Abstract
    Ranulph Glanville (June 13, 1946 – December 20, 2014) was a prolific writer, a magic designer, an avant-garde musician, a cybernetician of the first- and of the second-order, a philosopher in disguise, to name only a few roles. His contributions to second-order cybernetics and to areas like design, philosophy, conversation theory, methodology or games, with the tools and perspectives of his version of second-order cybernetics were unique and have been published recently under the title “The Black B∞x” in three volumes in edition echoraum (Glanville, 2009, 2012, 2014).

    In this short memorial lecture I will undertake a systematic attempt to make his work more easily accessible for others, including myself, and to provide a special location for Ranulph Glanville within the research program of second-order cybernetics in particular and within the research tradition of radical constructivism in general. It will become my central thesis in this lecture that Ranulph Glanville’s special role and function was to provide a meta-approach to all the available research programs in radical constructivism. This framework was transcendental in nature and focused on the conditions of the possibility for observation, for communication, for language, for knowledge or for learning to emerge at all. Thus, Ranulph Glanville reserved a unique place for himself that, at the same time, turned out to be magic for his explorations and very difficult to grasp for his intellectual environment.

    Literature:

    Glanville, R. (2009), The Black B∞x, vol. III: 39 Steps. Wien:edition echoraum
    Glanville, R. (2012), The Black B∞x, vol. I: Cybernetic Circles. Wien:edition echoraum
    Glanville, R. (2014), The Black B∞x, vol. II: Living in Cybernetic Circles. Wien:edition echoraum
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    A Multidisciplinary Approach to Homeland Protection Systems
    Dr. Mario Lamanna, Evoelectronics, Italy / Senior Scientist, Selex-SI, USA

    Abstract
    Homeland Protection Systems cover a large set of critical topics (e.g. secure communications, cyber security, border control, critical infrastructure protection, transport protection, territory protection), which are vital for ensuring healthy and stable society, promoting economic growth and protecting individual and collective liberty. Addressing Homeland Protection challenges requires to analyze, understand and predict the behavior of a set of different complex systems (e.g. communication networks, transportation systems, energy grids, etc.). Countering threats to the above complex systems require a comprehensive multidisciplinary and multilayered approach. The basic ideas of this approach are presented and analyzed, with the goal to identify the solutions offered by the new technology advances.
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    Building Solution-Focused Knowledge: A Systemic Approach for Structuring Reality
    Dr. Tilia Stingl De Vasconcelos, Academia Nova, Austria / Information Management Cross Cultural Communication, University of Applied Sciences, Austria

    Abstract
    The main purpose of this keynote is to support an open forum focused on solutions and/or ideas to contribute to a knowledge-driven society.

    Searching for solutions is a profoundly human characteristic. For many of us, a problem or an obstacle is a challenge rather than an impediment. This desire to overcome barriers has brought us to where we are now: to a world full of solutions and technologies for diverse problems, but also a world which is getting more and more complex, a world in which new problems emerge daily, and in which we often lack the time needed to analyze difficult situations. In addition, social networks gave social events a lot of power. Today, almost every innovation can be judged and eventually accepted or rejected by the public before even the developers have completely understood their own inventions. Thus it seems to be crucial for every scientific field to understand how systems dynamics and social interaction work.

    When new inventions make their way into the public, innumerable financial, economic, social and political problems emerge. In those cases, the great challenge we face is to find ways to communicate clearly among different research fields. Cybernetics and (social) systems theory offer us new ideas, new means to comprehend social complexity and understand interdisciplinary communication. Novel systemic approaches are showing remarkable results in breaking communicational boundaries among different disciplines and in dissipating conflicts. I highlight specific examples of their use in business contexts and provide an estimate of applicability, benefits and challenges for their implementation in organizations.
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    Innovative Approaches to Building Comprehensive Talent Pipelines: Helping to Grow a Strong and Diverse Professional Workforce
    Dr. Robert Cherinka, Senior Principal Information Systems Engineer, MITRE Corporation, USA
    Eng. Joseph Prezzama, Associate Department Head, Tampa Operations, MITRE Corporation, USA


    Abstract
    The world today is constantly changing requiring organizations to adapt quickly and seek expertise to help meet the demands on their business. There are many workforce challenges that organizations seek to overcome, and one of the hardest things to do in modern corporations is to keep the talent pool young and vibrant. Early career hires tend to bring new and exciting ideas into play that may not even be considered by their more seasoned peers. The challenge with early career hires, especially in the Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) career fields, is the extreme difficulty in finding candidates who, not only have book knowledge, but also have hands-on, real world experience. Statistics show that this is a real concern to professional workforce employers. In this presentation, we highlight a model aimed at adopting new approaches for seeking and evaluating high quality candidates for on-boarding, conducting interviews and hiring to build a corporate talent pipeline. We discuss the model as it relates to recruiting, training, competition-based interviewing and providing hands-on work experience toward helping to build strong professionals in an organization. We conclude by highlighting several examples of successful approaches and their outcomes.
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    The Global Impacts of 3D Printing on Innovation: A View from Florida Polytechnic University
    Mr. Tom Hull, Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Florida Polytechnic University, USA / Former: VP and CIO of Pace University; VP and CIO of Siena College; VP and CIO of Visions FCU; and IBM Director

    Abstract
    The vision of starting a new University in the State of Florida was to achieve an innovative, STEM focused and market driven educational institution that has impact on industry, research and the economy with a technology corridor and silicon-valley like affect. With that motivation we needed to demonstrate advanced and applied technology for innovation and entrepreneurship that is integrated with the University curriculum especially engineering and design courses. Our approach was to create innovation labs that included an innovation center in the form of a 3D Printing Lab that had latest hardware and software technology, prototype capability, scaled to serve groups of students and faculty and partnership with industry companies that were inventing the next generation of technology. The result was a 3D Printing Rapid Application Development (RAD) Makerspace that employed the concepts of rapid prototyping and generation of real objects designed in the Lab. The results are immediate high interest in the space and it’s attraction of various people based on it’s showcase and innovation capabilities.
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    Practical Approaches to Developing Global Competency across the Disciplines
    Dr. Houman A. Sadri, Department of Political Science, College of Sciences, University of Central Florida, USA
    Dr. Madelyn Flammia, Department of English, College of Arts and Humanities, University of Central Florida, USA


    Abstract
    The keynote speakers will discuss a series of assignments they have created to help students develop their global competency. One important aspect of global competency is awareness of and sensitivity to cultural differences. The assignments are designed to be used either individually or as a sequence. The assignments can be used to develop several information fluency and global competency skills. The information fluency skills include the ability to:

  • Conduct research on global issues
  • Evaluate sources on global issues
  • Access and evaluate non-US research sources
  • Identify electronic sources that include intercultural content
  • Evaluate the credibility of electronic sources and analyze their cultural biases
  • Synthesize information from numerous sources

  • The keynote speakers will share their experience using these assignments and will also offer suggestions for how the assignments can be used in other disciplines.

  • Integrate new information with pre-existing knowledge
  • Communicate knowledge effectively to various audiences

  • The assignments will also develop the skills and knowledge associated with global competency. These accomplishments include:

  • An understanding of cultural differences
  • Sensitivity to other cultures
  • The ability to think critically about global issues
  • Knowledge of world events and the ability to view them from an interdisciplinary perspective
  • Mastery of communication technologies for collaboration
  • The ability to collaborate with diverse others to manage knowledge and create shared understandings
  • An understanding of how to take action locally to address a global issue
  • A framework for global civic engagement
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    Towards a New Cybernetic Interdisciplinary Approach to Pedagogic Challenge
    Dr. Russell Jay Hendel, Dept. of Mathematics, Towson University, USA

    Abstract
    Since the mid nineteenth century, numerous researchers have attempted to formulate pedagogic challenge by the construction of hierarchies. Bloom, Anderson, Marzano, Van Hiele, Gagne, and Webb have independently formulated taxonomies; these taxonomies correlate well with each other indicating an intrinsic deeper structure. The goal of this presentation is explore a new approach to pedagogic challenge. This new approach has four distinct advantages over the current hierarchy approach: i) Cybernetic: It is exclusively based on internal information flow within a system and independent of subject matter content; ii) Operationally defined: The approach is based on objectively measurable activities such as counting and does not require a feel for concepts like creativity or analysis; iii) Interdisciplinary: We cite examples of our approach in diverse disciplines including mathematics, literary analysis, law, music, and games like chess; iv) Multi-disciplinary based: The approach bases itself on psychological, anatomical, logical and computer based correlating concepts. The essence of the approach is to assess pedagogic challenge by the degree of executive function required for learning; the degree of executive function in turn is based on a) the number of psychological modalities (visual, formal, analytical, and verbal) used in instruction and b) the number of Boolean parameters (the "Boolean function") by which the rules of the discipline are developed. We show this approach consistent with modern attempts at improving education such as the core standards.
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    Informational Urbanism: An Interdisciplinary View on ICT-driven "Smart" City Development
    Professor Wolfgang G. Stock, Chair -  Head of the Information Science Department, University of Düsseldorf, Germany

    Abstract
    Contemporary and future cities are often labeled as “smart cities,” “ubiquitous cities,” “knowledge cities” and “creative cities.” Informational urbanism includes all aspects of information and knowledge with regard to urban regions. “Informational city” is an umbrella term uniting the divergent trends of information-related city research. Informational urbanism is an interdisciplinary endeavor incorporating on the one side computer science and information science and on the other side urbanism, architecture, (city) economics, and (city) sociology. In our research project on informational cities, we visited more than 40 metropolises and smaller towns all over the world. In this talk, we sketch the theoretical background on a journey from Max Weber to the Internet of Things, introduce our research methods, and describe main results on characteristics of informational cities as prototypical cities of the emerging knowledge society.
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    Productivity of University Research in Six Main Fields in Selected US States and EU Countries
    Professor Osmo Kivinen, Director of the Research Unit for the Sociology of Education (RUSE), University of Turku, Finland
    Lecturer Juha Hedma, For 20 years, researcher at the Research Unit for the Sociology of Education (RUSE), University of Turku, Finland


    Abstract
    All around the world high expectations are laid on the capability of university research to contribute to the development of knowledge-based society and economic growth. The comparative analysis focuses on four US states (Massachusetts, Minnesota, Connecticut, New Jersey) and four EU countries (Finland, the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium), all qualifying as rich in terms of knowledge capital and economic prospects. Productivity of top university research in six main fields (agriculture, natural sciences, technology, clinical medicine, life sciences and social sciences) is examined based on data from Web of Science, NSF (National Science Foundation), NCES (National Center for Educational Statistics), EUMIDA (European University Data Collection) and NTU-ranking (National Taiwan University ranking).
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    Fostering Innovation in Higher Education through Entrepreneurial Leadership
    Professor Ronald A. Styron, Jr., Professor of Educational Leadership, Director of the Quality Enhancement Plan, University of South Alabama, USA
    Dr. Jennifer Styron, College of Nursing, University of South Alabama. USA / Former Research Specialist and Distance Education Coordinator at The University of Southern Mississippi, USA


    Abstract
    This paper includes a description of the unique set of attributes associated with entrepreneurial leaders including their ability to embrace change, take risks, and identify opportunities for personal and professional growth. The importance of organizational creativity and innovation, and strategies for leaders to develop those qualities in members of their organization is also discussed. Furthermore, model entrepreneurial programs based on 1) the advancement of student innovation and entrepreneurialism, 2) faculty innovation and entrepreneurialism through financial incentives, sabbaticals, and recognition, 3) university-industry collaboration, 4) strong linkages between regional and local economic development efforts, and 5) the creation of university and industry consortiums are provided as exemplars. The conclusion section contains recommendations for university leaders pertaining to personalized leadership approaches attained by blending various leadership styles with democratic practices constructed around the tenets of entrepreneurial leadership.
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    Man is the Measure of All Things:
    Metrics: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Professor Thomas Marlowe, Dr. in Computer Science and Dr. in Mathematics, Program Advisor for Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University, USA

    Abstract
    Who needs metrics? Where do they come from, anyway? How can we make sense or progress without them? Is a bad metric better than no metric? Are metrics the source of their own failure? How can we avoid misapplying metrics? What is a zombie metric?

    We present an overview with examples of uses, abuses, pitfalls and misunderstandings in the definition and application of metrics, and argue for a better understanding of and a more careful approach to metrics.
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    Second-Order Science and New Cybernetics: A Revolution in Scientific Structures
    Dr. Karl H. Müller, Director of The Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics, Vienna, Austria / Professor at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

    Abstract
    Under the heading of “Second-order Science and New Cybernetics” a book will be published which presents a new architecture for the science system and offers new roles and functions for cybernetics which differ wildly from old cybernetics as it was developed between the 1940s and the 1960s or even from second-order cybernetics as propagated by Heinz von Foerster, Ranulph Glanville, Gordon Pask, Louis H. Kauffman, Klaus Krippendorff, Bernard Scott, Stuart A. Umpleby and many others since the late 1960s and 1970s. The lecture will be divided into three main parts
  • The first part lays out the new environments of second-order science and new cybernetics and emphasizes the new configuration of first-order science as we know it and the two new levels of zero-order science with its concentration of research infrastructures and second-order science which operates on the building blocks like models, theories, test results, theoretical concepts or functions from first-order science.
  • The second part focuses on significant major contemporary inversions within the science system which, in combination, constitute a new Copernican revolution. It will be shown that this new Copernican revolution can be characterized as a complexity and as a reflexivity revolution of the overall science system.
  • Finally, second-order science and new cybernetics can be institutionalized as research programs and as curricula in a variety of ways and the lecture will offer several examples for new research and teaching programs in this field.

  • Literature:

    Riegler, A., Müller, K.H. (2014)(eds.), Special Issue of Constructivist Foundations on ‚Second-Order Science‘. No. 1, Vol. 10
    Müller, K.H., Riegler, A. (2014b), “Second-Order Science: A Vast and Largely Unexplored Science Frontier”, in: Constructivist Foundations, vol. 10, no. 1, 7 – 15  
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    The Use of Narrative Medicine Literature for Interdisciplinary Communication through the Internet Learning System
    Professor Ya-Huei Wang, Chung Shan Medical University, Taiwan

    Abstract
    An increasing reliance on nonhuman technologies leads to an impersonal and calculating medical care system, letting medical care professionals and specialists not care much about patients’ human experiences and hence leading to a decline in the quality of medical care. Patients lose personal contact with their doctors and other medical care professionals. Failing to understand patients’ perspectives would lead to communication problems among physicians, medical care professionals, patients, and patients’ families. However, the communication problems may be bridged by narrative medicine literature study. In the study, narrative medicine literature and interdisciplinary cooperative learning through the internet learning system were promoted to foresee a more humanizing medical care.
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    Academic Ethos, Pathos, and Logos Intersect with Innovation and Entrepreneurship
    Dr. Marta Szabo White, Director of the Study Abroad in Transition Economies, Director of Business Learning Community, Director of the Program Business Mediterranean Style, Georgia State University, USA

    Abstract
    This paper explores the intersection of ethos, pathos, and logos with the newest conference theme: Innovation and Entrepreneurship. In Drucker’s [1] entrepreneurial management, or new technology, entrepreneurship and innovation are systematically related through cause and effect, underscoring that entrepreneurship is a form of innovation and innovation is both a driver of and consequence of entrepreneurship.

    Ethos (character/credibility), pathos (emotion) and logos (logic) fosters a powerful platform for this cause and effect relationship to cultivate. While innovation is the tool of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship is the tool of innovation, ethos, pathos, and logos provide a rich milieu for these catalysts to help create the inimitable.

    The origin of ethos, pathos and logos began over 2,000 years ago: The Greek philosopher, Aristotle argued that persuasion consists of three categories: ethos, pathos and logos [2] & [4].

    Ethos [Greek for character]
    Ethical Appeal – Persuasion emanates from the credibility, authority, or reputation of the speaker or writer. An ethos-principled argument is characterized by an appeal based on ethics or credibility.

    Pathos [Greek for experience or suffering]
    Emotional Appeal – Persuasion is grounded in sympathy, emotion, or instinct. A pathetic story conveys emotion and imagination such that the audience is empathetic with the values and beliefs of the speaker or writer.

    Logos [Greek for word]
    Logical Appeal – Persuasion rests with reason and refers to an argument's logical appeal. Of paramount importance is the internal consistency of an argument and supporting evidence, e.g. constructs such as if A, then B.

    Persuasion is both innovation and entrepreneurship. What is persuasion if not the exploitation of an opportunity, commercialization of a product/service, bringing something new into use, i.e, innovation [3]. From the previously established cause and effect relationship, then persuasion is also entrepreneurship.

    If ethos, pathos, and logos comprise persuasion, then these constituents are linked to innovation and entrepreneurship.

    This is a linear representation of a non-linear model. Joseph Schumpeter’s [3] Creative Destruction, where destruction of an existing product/service enables the new to replace the old. This is similar to Natural Economic Selection, where survival of the fittest is dictated by the market.

    The value-chain of ethos, pathos, and logos (where each activity adds value), serve as a pivotal function in connecting the dots, in much the same manner as Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford commencement speech reference. In this speech, he discusses dropping in on a Calligraphy class at Reed College and learning Serif and Sans Serif type spacing, all of which made perfect sense ten years later when the Macintosh was invented with beautiful typography, multiple type-faces and proportionally spaced fonts… and since Windows just copied the Mac (according to Steve Jobs), no personal computer would have such beautiful typography if he (Steve Jobs) had not dropped in on that class. His point is that connecting the dots can only be done looking backwards. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1R-jKKp3NA

    For this Plenary session, I will share a video to illustrate the intersection of Academic Ethos, Pathos, and Logos with Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

    References
    [1] Drucker, P. [1998] Innovation and Entrepreneurship, New York: Harper.
    [2] Ramage, J.D. & Bean, J.C. [1998]. Writing Arguments. [4th Ed.]. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon. pp 81-82.
    [3] Schumpeter, J. (1934). The Theory of Economic Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    [4] Sproat, E., Driscoll, D.L. & Brizee, A. [2012]. Aristotle's Rhetorical Situation. Copyright ©1995-2014 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University.
    https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/625/03/ Accessed February 15, 2014.
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    Knowledge Management Systems as an Interdisciplinary Communication and Personalized General-Purpose Technology
    Professor Ulrich Schmitt, Business School, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa / Former IT consultant in London and Basle and Professor and Vice President at two independent universities in Germany

    Abstract
    Has a novel Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) concept supported by a prototype system got what it takes to grow into a transformative General-Purpose-Technology (GPT)? In this address, the KM scenario of a decentralizing revolution where individuals and self-organized groups yield more power and autonomy is related to a GPT’s essential characteristics, including a wide scope for improvement and elaboration (in people’s private, professional and societal life), a broad range of diverse uses and disciplines (in the educational and work context), and strong complementarities with existing or new technologies (like Organizational KM Systems and a proposed World Heritage of Memes Repository).
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    Diseño de Acciones Formativas en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje
    Profesora Gabriela Vilanova, Directora de Proyectos en Ingeniería de Software, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Argentina
    Profesor Jorge Varas, Co-Director de Proyectos en Ergonomía Organizacional, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Argentina


    Abstract
    Los procesos educativos se han modificado para adaptarse a las condiciones sociales actuales. A su vez, la introducción de la tecnología en el campo educativo ha dado lugar a nuevos escenarios basados en el uso de las TICs (Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación), que configuran diferentes itinerarios de aprendizaje para cada individuo. Es fundamental el rol de la universidad, convirtiéndose en la institución de la sociedad en red. En este sentido, las instituciones de educación superior deben responder a las demandas actuales de la sociedad y asegurar que los estudiantes adquieran las habilidades necesarias en el espacio de formación, y en los entornos de trabajo actuales y futuros.

    La aplicación de las TIC a acciones de formación en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje posibilita diversos frentes de cambios a considerar, cambios en las concepciones de los procesos dinámicos, identidad del docente, cambios en las prácticas de profesores y de los alumnos, y de los recursos.
    Diseñar acciones de formación supone participar de un conjunto de decisiones en forma de juego de equilibrio entre el modelo pedagógico, los usuarios, según el rol de profesores y alumnos, y las posibilidades de la tecnología.
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    Desde los Datos hasta el Valor: Procesos de Agregación de Información basados en el Concepto de Mayoría
    Profesor José I. Peláez, Director de la Cátedra de Métricas y Gestión de Intangibles, Universidad de Málaga, España / Premio Spinoff en Creación de Empresas de base tecnológica, en el campo del marketing digital.

    Abstract
    Cada día en el mundo se generan exabytes de datos, una generación que no para de crecer cada día desde múltiples fuentes, videos, imágenes, redes sociales, comercio electrónico, dando lugar al denominado Big Data, un conjunto de datos con unas características de gran volumen y complejidad. Son estas características las que dificultan el proceso de manejar, almacenar y extraer información de valor a partir de ellos, y plantean a la comunidad científica diferentes desafíos que tienen que ser resueltos para poder avanzar: problemas de captura, transformación, almacenamiento, búsqueda, visualización y análisis de estos datos. Es en este último punto donde los procesos de agregación de información son de gran importancia, ya que son los encargados de obtener un resumen de los datos existentes para ser utilizados en los procesos de toma de decisión. Los procesos de agregación de información basados en el concepto de mayoría, tratan de obtener un valor que represente a la mayoría de los datos, teniendo en cuenta también aquellos datos que representan un minoría en el conjunto total. En esta conferencia, el objetivo es mostrar este tipo de procesos y su utilidad en diferentes campos de la investigación.
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    Fuentes Internas y Externas de la Innovación  –de producto, procesos, mercado y organizacional– en el Sector de Servicios y en el Sector Industrial en Colombia
    Profesor Álvaro Turriago-Hoyos, Universidad de la Sabana, Colombia

    Abstract
    Hoy en día es ampliamente aceptada la función que cumple la innovación como variable que promueve tanto la productividad como la competitividad de las organizaciones. Es necesario por ende gestionar y administrar la innovación dados sus importantes alcances. Una forma sistemática y organizada de conquistar su gestión es identificar sus fuentes para estructurar estrategias de gerencia que además de impulsar estas fuentes perfilen también sus impactos en las organizaciones.

    Esta exposición analiza las relaciones entre las fuentes internas —fundamentalmente la I&D— y las externas —adquisición de tecnología— que son insumos esenciales en la generación de conocimiento operativo manifestado a través de innovaciones.

    La metodología seguida estructura ecuaciones representativas de Funciones de Producción de Conocimiento, que partiendo de una aproximación insumo-producto, permiten identificar los determinantes más relevantes de la innovación. Los insumos son las actividades de I&D y la Transferencia de Tecnología. Estas ecuaciones consideran además como variables de control los componentes de las cadenas de valor de las organizaciones, clientes, proveedores, competidores y también por instituciones de investigación —ordinariamente universidades—, dada la complejidad tecnológica que requiere la consolidación de las  innovaciones. De igual forma se incluyen otras variables de control como tamaño, pertenencia a un sector de alta o baja tecnología y la pertenencia de la organización analizada a un grupo económico del exterior de las organizaciones consideradas.

    Se trabaja con evidencia empírica en organizaciones del sector de Servicios y del sector Industrial colombiano, recogida en las II y III Encuestas de Innovación para el sector Servicios y la V y VI Encuestas de Innovación para la Industria en Colombia, en el período comprendido entre 2008 y 2012.
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    Investigación y Consultoría: Investigación a través de la Consultoría y Consultoría a través de la Investigación
    Professor Nagib Callaos,  President del IIIS, USA / Ex-Decano de investigación y Desarrollo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela / Presidente Fundador de la Fundación de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela.
    Profesor Andrés Tremante, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Florida International University, USA / Ex-Presidente de la Fundación de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela.


    Abstract
    Algunas áreas académicas requieren necesariamente de las actividades de consultoría o de otras actividades relacionadas con la práctica, especialmente si se busca que la investigación desemboque en desarrollo o en la solución de problemas de la vida real. Por ejemplo, ¿cuál sería el “laboratorio” (como medio de desarrollo) de un profesor de metodologías de desarrollo de sistemas de información si no es el desarrollo de sistemas de información de la vida real? En algunas disciplinas académicas, las actividades de consultoría enriquecen, dan soporte y mejoran la investigación, como sería el caso de algunas disciplinas de ingeniería, derecho, medicina, ciencias gerenciales, investigación de operaciones, etc. Pero, en otras disciplinas académicas la consultoría es percibida como una actividad que pudiera considerarse como una actividad que distrae de la investigación académica de rigor. Esto podría ser cierto en algunas disciplinas, pero, aún en esos casos, la investigación académica de rigor que se realiza terminaría eventualmente generando, a través de otros investigadores o académicos, investigación aplicada que termina dando soporte a soluciones de problemas en la vida real o a desarrollos de productos o servicios de utilidad a la sociedad. En consecuencia, aún en los casos de disciplinas en las que se estima que la consultoría podría distraer la investigación de rigor, las actividades de consultoría son necesarias para los efectos de la respectiva toma de decisiones y de establecimiento de políticas nacionales o empresariales, para transformar el producto de la investigación en productos o servicios útiles a la sociedad, o para resolver problemas de la vida real. Es bien conocido que la investigación en muchos departamentos académicos es posibilitada gracias a los aportes financieros de entes públicos o privados orientados al desarrollo o a la solución de problemas de la vida real. En consecuencia, en tales casos, relacionar cibernéticamente la investigación y desarrollo (al menos a nivel organizacional) podría producir el desarrollo, el resultado requerido, o la solución del problema en cuestión (ver la figura abajo)

    Investigación*, Desarrollo y Consultoría** están relacionados, directa o indirectamente, inmediata o mediatamente, a través de lazos cibernéticos co-regulativos (retroalimentación negativa o de pro-alimentación), y co-amplificativos (retroalimentación positiva). Lo cual pudiera  producir efectos sinérgicos que a) aumentarían la efectividad (y quizás la eficiencia) de ambas actividades y/o b) generar sistemas/productos/desarrollos. Innovaciones, emprendedurías (entrepreneuships),  patentes, artículos de investigación, etc. Por el otro lado, este tipo de relaciones sistémico-cibernéticas entre investigación y consultoría proveen del tipo de experiencia requerida para ser combinada con la transmisión de conocimiento para los efectos de una educación real, la cual no debe ser reducida a mera instrucción. En el contexto de carreras profesionales es  donde este tipo de experiencia más se necesita para una auténtica y efectiva educación. Esa es la razón por la que es necesario hacer explícito que una adecuada relación entre investigación y consultoría provee un soporte fundamental a la Educación superior, especialmente (pero no únicamente) en las disciplinas profesionales. La educación, en cuanto episteme, es condición necesaria para la investigación (producción de nuevo conocimiento) lo cual a través de la consultoría genera la techne (desarrollo de productos, servicios, etc.) necesaria para la producción de innovaciones, patentes, y lo demás requerido  para el desarrollo de las sociedades y el mejoramiento de las condiciones de vida  (*Estamos refiriéndonos tanto a las investigaciones con apoyo financieros (salarios, concesiones, contratos, apoyos a la investigación, etc.) como a las investigaciones sin soporte financiero. ** Nos estamos refiriendo tanto a consultorías con fin de lucro, como las sin fin de lucro, y las hechas ad-honorem)