Thumbnail1
Inter-Cultural and Inter-Disciplinary Communication? - Part 1 of 2 (Conversational Session)
Co-Facilitators: Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, The George Washington University, USA / Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, USA; Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Taking into account that a discipline can be conceived as intellectual culture, is there the possibility of reciprocal learning, via analogical thinking, between studies and research in ‘Inter-Cultural Communication’ and ‘Inter-Disciplinary Communication’?” How both areas are related to Academic Globalization?
Thumbnail2
Inter-Cultural and Inter-Disciplinary Communication? - Part 2 of 2 (Conversational Session)
Co-Facilitators: Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, The George Washington University, USA; Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Taking into account that a discipline can be conceived as intellectual culture, is there the possibility of reciprocal learning, via analogical thinking, between studies and research in ‘Inter-Cultural Communication’ and ‘Inter-Disciplinary Communication’?” How both areas are related to Academic Globalization?
Thumbnail3
Academic Globalization (Participative Workshop)
Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, The George Washington University, USA / Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, USA

Abstract
In this workshop we shall discuss recent progress in academic globalization and then consider how the systems and cybernetics community can act together – cooperating on research projects, establishing educational programs, coordinating conferences, enriching the content of Wikipedia, and other activities.  We shall brainstorm needed actions, cluster them on a wall and then form into groups to plan strategies for implementation.  A key topic in our discussions may be cultural conflicts or misunderstandings that may arise as people from different societies interact more frequently.  Actions that can be taken to minimize or manage such conflicts will be part of the discussion.
Thumbnail4
3D Printing and Technologies (Workshop)
Mr. Tom Hull, Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Florida Polytechnic University, USA / CTO of Moffitt Cancer Center / Former: VP and CIO - Pace University, VP and CIO - Siena College, IBM Director and Executive Consultant.

Abstract
The speaker will briefly describe in the workshop the nature in 3D technologies, their principal present uses, their future potential and why these technologies are so important and even necessary in some cases for integrating research, education and innovations or real life problem solving. He will show the huge potential of 3D Technologies providing synergic bridges between academy and industry. He will show why 3D Technologies provide a real support for huge educational innovations in Higher Education and pre-college education. He will present the case of the Florida Polytechnic University as an example of this kind of Educational Innovations. He will also highlight the great potential of 3D Technologies for entrepreneurship and innovations in MANY industrial areas and human activities, including art, humanities, design, architecture, engineering, manufacturing, biomedical engineering, health systems, product prototyping, customization, etc. some demonstrations of 3D printing will also be included in this workshop, which will complement the exhibition planned to be organized in the same venue of the workshop and the conference.
Thumbnail5
Information Systems Verification and Validation: Three Perspectives: Technical, Systemic, and Philosophical (Participatory Panel)
Panelists and Facilitators: Professor Sushil Acharya, Director of Research & Grants School of Engineering, Mathematics and Science Software Engineering, Robert Morris University, USA; Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Three panelists will present a different perspective (Technical, Systemic, and Philosophical) in10 minutes with regards to Information Systems Verification and Validation. Then, the audience will have 30 minutes to ask questions and make comments, not necessarily related to the content presented by the panelists. Some suggested questions for the conversational part: Should V&V start in the week of the developing project? Should V&V be organically or systemically embedded with the information systems development methodology? Is an updated Trivium required in order to have an adequate interaction with the users? Is Ethos, Pathos, and Logos important, or even necessary, in information systems V&V? Should the users and stakeholders have a similar knowledge or experience regarding V&V and no to let it just the responsibility of the developers? How painful is the Beta test as a necessary part of V&V? Should the users be prepared for this painful phase? Might these answers generalized to any kind of real life systems analysis and synthesis?
Thumbnail6
Research and Consulting, and Differences and Relationships between Education and Instruction (Conversational Session)
Co-Facilitators: Dr. Joe Manganelli, Kent State University, USA, Fluor Corporation, Xplr Design, Llc; Dr. Luis Velazquez-Araque, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Guayaquil, Ecuador / Founder of the Aerodynamics Laboratory at National University of Tachira, Venezuela; Professor Andres Tremante, The Mechanical & Materials Engineering (MME) Department, Florida International University, USA; and Dr. Risa Blair, College of Arts and Sciences, Grantham University, USA / eLearning Instructional Designer, Kaplan University, USA

Abstract
Some academic areas require necessarily of consulting activities of other related practicing experience. For example, what would be the “lab” for a professor of information systems development methodologies if not information systems development in the real world? In some other academic fields consulting activities might enrich, support and enhance research as it might be the case of some Engineering fields, Law, Medicine, Managements Science, Operation Research, etc. Still in other academic fields consulting is perceived as distracting activities from what is considered to be a scholarly research. In some fields or disciplines this might be true, but even in these cases scholarly research would eventually generate, via other scholars or researchers, applied research which would support real life problem solving and, consequently, decision and policy making processes which part of the consulting activities. Consequently, research and consulting are, directly or indirectly, immediately or mediately, related and complementing each other via cybernetic co-regulative loops (negative feedback or feedforward) and co-amplificatory loops (positive feedback) which, in turn, might potentially produce synergic effects that a) increase the effectiveness (and possibly the efficiency) of both kinds of activities, and/or b) generate systems/products development, innovations, entrepreneurship, patents, research papers, etc.

An increasing number of academics are explicitly or implicitly relating their research and consulting activities between themselves and sometimes with their educational activities. Consulting via research and making research via consulting are both being used with more frequency, in the corporative sector as well as in the academic sector, or in organizations created by and/or in the context of Higher Education organizations.

Some academic areas require necessarily of consulting activities of other related practicing experience. For example, what would be the “lab” for a professor of information systems development methodologies if not information systems development in the real world? In some other academic fields consulting activities might enrich, support and enhance research as it might be the case of some Engineering fields, Law, Medicine, Managements Science, Operation Research, etc. Still in other academic fields consulting is perceived as distracting activities from what is considered to be a scholarly research. Each of these three perspectives might relatively be the right one; they would not conflict with each other, depending on the academic fields they are referring to. Having said so, a Higher Education organization should have both activities integrated with each other in order to ingrate the organization to the Society at large which is a necessary condition for legitimizing itself and reciprocating the financial support being provided by the Society to maintain its own functioning as an academic organization, not completely dedicated to instruction or education, but also to research.

Depending on the academic perspective, “research and consulting” are, are not, might be, or should be related as complementing each other. We think that frequently they are, or might be, explicitly or implicitly, directly or indirectly, cybernetically related via co-regulative loops (negative feedback or feedforward) and co-amplificatory loops (positive feedback) which, in turn, might certainly produce synergic effects that a) would increase the effectiveness (and possibly the efficiency) of both kinds of activities, and/or b) generate systems/products development, innovations, entrepreneurship, patents, research papers, etc.

The last part of this session was oriented to a related topic (differences and relationships between education and instruction) which could be abstracted as follow:

“Education is that which remains, if one has forgotten everything he learned in school.” Albert Einstein
“But education, in the true sense, is not mere instruction…It is unfolding the whole human nature. It is growing up in all things to our highest possibility” J. F. Clarke
“By education I mean an all-round drawing out of the best in child and man-body, mind and spirit. Literacy is not the end of education or even the beginning.” Mahatma Gandhi

How important is to differentiate the notion of “education” from the notions of “Instruction, Learning, and Training”? In previous conversational conference we tried to differentiate between “education and instruction” as well as between “education and e-learning”. On the later we even held a debate. A consequence of these conversational and debate session a draft of an article was written where “education and instruction” were differentiated and related, with the purpose of trying to make more effective moth of them. The conclusion in this article was that “instruction” was a mean, even a necessary means in any educational process, but it should not be taken as an end in itself. The suggestion for this conversational session is propose that “Learning, and Training” are other means used in educational processes which should not be taken as ends in themselves. Several means may, or should, be used in education, but (we suggest) that none of this mean should be taken as an end in itself. Otherwise we might generate a conceptual (or intellectual) corruption that might have undesirable epistemological and pragmatic consequences.

Is this suggestion acceptable? If not, why? If yes, then what could we do in order to avoid confusing these notions?

Thumbnail7
Building a Cyber Professional Workforce: Key Enablers
Dr. Robert Cherinka, Senior Principal Information Systems Engineer, MITRE Corporation, USA
Eng. Joseph Prezzama, Associate Department Head, Tampa Operations, MITRE Corporation, USA


Abstract
With increasingly complex cyber-attacks, an organization's entire IT and communications infrastructure could be compromised in a matter of minutes. Cyber threats have become a worldwide systemic problem, and one that we all need to be aware of, prepare for, and be part of the solution. To make matters worse, the demand for a cyber skilled workforce is high, much higher than the current supply and talent pool. We are all facing serious workforce challenges, but in the area of Cyber, this drought in talent could have very high implications. In this presentation, we will discuss aspects of building a professional cyber security workforce. In particular, we will highlight current cybersecurity workface challenges; examine the anatomy of a cybersecurity professional workforce in terms of the culture, people, processes and technology representing key enablers for building the talent, framework and capabilities necessary; introduce an approach for building a professional career path and talent pipeline in cyber security; and finally we will highlight our use of Cyber Capture the Flag (CTF) competitions as a corporate initiative aimed at adopting new approaches for hiring.
Thumbnail8
Security: The Missing Component in the Product Development Lifecycle
David Shearer, CISSP, Chief Executive Officer, The International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium ((ISC)2), USA / Deputy Chief Information Officer at the U.S. Department of the Interior, USA

Abstract
Electrical engineers are building systems and grids; software engineers are building applications for the masses; and civil engineers are building airports and other structures. What do all of these engineering disciplines have in common? Security is a missing component throughout all of their product development lifecycles. With the pressure to rush products to market, security considerations are overlooked or brushed aside in favor of product functionality and condensed development timelines. The consequences rendered from this type of product development culture are evident in instances such as the mass recall after the Jeep hack, which resulted in extra cost, employee time and reputational damage. When we look at the entire product development lifecycle, we must start advocating for security until it becomes a key requirement on par with functionality.
Thumbnail9
Purdue Homeland Security Institute Research
Professor J. Eric Dietz, Director of Purdue Homeland Security Institute, Computer and Information Technology Department, Purdue University, USA

Abstract
Homeland security is one of the most important new areas of study in the twenty-first century. As an interdisciplinary field of study, homeland security is positioned at the intersection of science, engineering, technology, agriculture, management and economics, health sciences, and the social sciences of sociology, psychology, communication and political science. This interdisciplinary focus serves to broaden our fundamental understanding of homeland security issues and offers the potential to significantly impact and contribute to a wide variety of emerging technologies and science.

The program provides students with the opportunity to gain specific skills and an understanding of homeland security issues from a diverse group of faculty while also studying a specific discipline. Students are exposed to theoretical and fundamental issues related to preventing, mitigating, preparing for, responding to, and recovering from catastrophic events.

Through a campus-wide, interdisciplinary, graduate-level area of specialization in homeland security, students who complete a required set of two core courses plus additional elective hours in their major area, will earn a designation on their transcripts. Enrollment in and approval of this specialization is done through individual departments and colleges. Below is a list of links to department and college websites related to the homeland security area of specialization.

Graduate students interested in this specialization should contact their departments directly.

The Purdue Homeland Security Institute was established in response to the events of September 11, 2001 with the charter to help our nation prevent, protect, respond and recover from any threat or action taken against our homeland. Today, we fully embrace the principles outlined in the National Response Framework as we work daily to identify and confront the myriad of homeland security challenges our nation faces. We then pursue solutions using the power of inter-disciplinary discovery, learning, and engagement here at Purdue University and apply that knowledge across the State of Indiana and the nation.
Thumbnail10
Delight and Responsibility: Problematic Situations and Preferred Future States
Anne Connell, MS, CFA, CERT Division, Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

Abstract
The simplest way to describe the human-centered design process is to divide it into two phases: analysis and synthesis. But this description misses a crucial element—the connection between the two, the active move from one state to another, the transition or transformation that is at the heart of solving real problems. How do we move from analysis to synthesis? From problem to solution? From current situation to preferred future? From research to concept? From constituent needs to proposed response? From context to form? How do researchers bridge the gap?

The bond model illustrates one way of thinking about the path from analysis to synthesis—the way in which the use of models to frame research results acts as a basis for framing possible futures. It says something more than “then the other thing happens.” It shows how developers and researchers move up through a level of analysis in order to move forward through time to the next desired state. And bond models act as the vehicle for that move.

The bond model is the best way to illustrate this. It is organized as a two-by-two matrix. On one side we represent the analysis (the problem, current situation, research, constituent needs, context). The right column represents synthesis (the solution, preferred future, concept, proposed response, form). The bottom row represents the glue world we inhabit or could inhabit. The top row represents abstractions, models of what is or what could be, which we imagine and share with others. Ideally, the human-centered design process begins with observation and investigation—an inventory (or description) of the current situation.

We make sense of research by analysis, filtering data we collect to highlight points we decide are important or using tools we’re comfortable with to sort, prioritize, and order. We frame the current situation, but move out of the strictly concrete. We define the problem. We interpret. Analysis begins as thoughtful reflection on the present and continues as conversation with the possible. Crucial for progress is documenting and visualizing our analysis, making it possible for us to come back to it, making it possible to imagine alternatives, making it possible ultimately to discuss and agree with others on our framing and definition. We might write down a list of findings or a statement defining the problem. Better still is writing a story. A story describes actors and actions; it suggests relationships, which we may represent in visual form. A story of what happens suggests a model of what is—an interpretation of our research. The process of coming to a shared representation externalizes individual thinking and helps build trust across disciplines and stakeholders.

Having agreed on a model of what is (framed the current situation, defined the problem) then the other side of the coin (the preferred future, the solution) is implied. We can devise stories about what could happen. We can model alternatives in relation to our first bond model. In doing so, we’ve moved to the use and development of bond models of what could be. It is in the realm of abstraction—by thinking with bond models—that we bridge the gap between analysis and synthesis.
Thumbnail11
The Key Role of Interdisciplinary Communication in Cyber Security
Dr. Mario Lamanna, Evoelectronics, Italy / Senior Scientist, Selex-SI, USA

Abstract
Developments in electronics and computers during the last 70 years have given rise to the so called Information Age and created the new entity of the so called Cyber Space, as the backbone of the main economic and social activities. As a consequence, the life and wellness of citizen and nations in the Third Millennium are going to depend more and more on the efficient and secure use of this new entity. In order to achieve a satisfactory level of Cyber Security, a new multifaceted/multidisciplinary approach is mandatory. This new multidisciplinary approach consists in coupling computer technologies with social and geopolitical aspects of the new Information Age. Analyzing the key role of Interdisciplinary Communication in Cyber Security is the essential step to achieve the right level of Cyber Security.
Thumbnail12
Smart’ as a Key Component of the Sustainable’ Multidisciplinary City Development
Professor Tomas Zelinka, Vice-Dean, Faculty of Transportation Sciences, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic

Abstract
Smart city as an urban development vision is targeting on sustainable city development and higher quality of life. Such vision is reachable by complex multidisciplinary approach based on balanced excelling in multiple key areas like environment, economy, people living, and government and its success is tightly connected with investments in human and social capital, as well as in mobility and ICT communication infrastructure. Even though smart city development emphasizes both environmental, economic as well as social aspects of sustainability, the social sustainable development is faced to the weakest possibility to be well understood, objectively quantified and managed. This paper points out the social aspects with aim to identify principal importance to effectively include these aspects in all critical processes and decisions to ensure reaching one of the key the goals of Smart city vision – the higher quality of life.
Thumbnail13
Effective Verbal Encouragement: Prayer, Business and Teaching
Dr. Russell Jay Hendel, Dept. of Mathematics, Towson University, USA

Abstract
You are evaluating a student’s work. Your goal is to get the student to improve. What is the most effective verbal encouragement you can give? Would it be a letter Grade? If so, would it be A, B, or C? Or would it be words and guidance? You are a doctor saying goodbye to a person who just recovered from a heart attack.  You have a moment to wish the patient well. What is the most effective verbal encouragement? Is there a real difference in terms of avoidance of recurrence in what you say? You are a big athlete who just lost a competitive match. You spontaneously exclaim to yourself, “I don’t believe I did that?” Is there other self-talk that would prevent future mistakes? You are a Rabbi, Priest, Imam or Atheist praying for someone’s good fortune in some sphere. Does it matter what you say? Can different prayers achieve significantly outcomes?  In this talk, we will focus on effective verbal encouragement. The theory is not fully developed but more like a fresh meadow sprouting after a winter thaw-out. We will expose the audience to the varied colors of this young field, we will see its best opportunities and we will learn principles of effective verbal encouragement. Along the way, we will water our field with the principles of attribution theory and measurability. Numerous examples will be given.
Thumbnail14
Big Data: A Treasure Chest for Interdisciplinary Research
Professor Richard Segall, Department of Computer and Information Technology, Arkansas State University, USA

Abstract
Big Data is an evolving term that describes any voluminous amount of structured, semi-structured and unstructured data that has the potential to be mined for information.

Although Big Data doesn't refer to any specific quantity, the term is often used when speaking about Petabytes and Exabytes of data. Measured in terms of volume, velocity, and variety, Big Data represents a major disruption in the business intelligence and data management landscape, upending fundamental notions about governance and Information Technology (IT) delivery.

With traditional solutions becoming too expensive to scale or adapt to rapidly evolving conditions, companies are scrambling to find affordable technologies that will help them store, process, and query all of their data. Innovative solutions will enable companies to extract maximum value from Big Data and create differentiated, more personal customer experiences.

Big Data also is all data that is not fit for the traditional highly structured Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS) whether used for Online Transactional Processing (OLTP) or analytics purposes. Hence utilizing Big Data calls for the needs for new technology to handle and analyze. Clusters in Big Data contains data organized into key spaces that can contain multiple “column families” that can be considered analogous to tables but can have any number of columns or be completely dynamic columns that change with the time horizon.

According to a report on Big Data by the McKinsey Global Institute (2011): Big Data if used creatively and effectively to drive efficiency and quality, the health care sector can create more than $300 billion in value each year, a retailer using Big Data to the full could increase its operating margin by more than 60 percent, and users of services enabled by personal-location data could capture $600 billion in consumer surplus.

The field of Big Data involves expanded technologies & architectural patterns, using Big Data in clouds, clusters and grids; programming systems for Big Data; storage, visualization and analytics for Big Data; and study of state of practice of using Big Data.

The numerous applications of Big Data range from such areas as manufacturing, agriculture, air traffic control, to computational energy, medicine, earth and atmospheric sciences.

The objective of this talk is to present the concepts of Big Data, explore its analytics and technologies and their applications and develop a broad understanding of issues pertaining to the use of Big Data in multidisciplinary fields.
Thumbnail15
CHAOS Chronicles, Focusing on Failures and Possible Improvements in IT Projects
Professor Hans Mulder, Executive Professor at the Antwerp Management School, University of Antwerp, Belgium / European Research Director at the Standish Group, EU / Founder of Viagroep, Netherland; and Mr. Jim Johnson, Founder and Chairman, The Standish Group, USA

Abstract
The Standish Group has been formally researching the causes of software project success and failure since 1994. Prior to this date very little research was done and the problems of software project failure were hidden due to lack of transparency. Standish’s cumulative research encompasses 22 years of data on why projects succeed or fail, representing more than 50,000 active completed IT projects and more than 60,000 inactive completed projects stored in a database. Currently, the crisis in IT projects continues. Governments, industry, and parliaments in North America and Europe seek answers regarding why IT projects add little or no value for society, organizations, and individuals. Standish’s research is used more than ever before. Through the CHAOS University program, The Standish Group has hosted almost 500 workshops, as well as focus groups, project “group therapy” sessions, and executive retreats around the globe that focus on particular issues of project management. Major changes in the way software projects were accomplished resulted directly from the findings in this research. Some of these changes improved project performance, while others have acerbated the problem. Therefore, the overall results show very little improvement for the last 22 years. There is both much current debate and new areas of discovery to which the CHAOS Database offers clues. These debates and discoveries include the future role of the project manager, do sophisticated tools help or hurt, how to create a good project culture, is Scrum the holy grail, and what does it take to be a good project executive sponsor?
Thumbnail16
HYPOTHESES NON FINGO Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Schumpeterian Perspective
Professor Emeritus J. Hanns Pichler, Austrian Institute for SME Research, Vienna University of Economics & Business, Austria / Senior Schumpeter Fellow, Center for European Studies, Harvard University, USA

Abstract
In trying to paintbrush background and scientific "environs" when Schumpeter`s visionary "Theory of Economic Development" (1912) came out, classical and neoclassical thought as well as Marx’ "Capital" (in all its volumes) had been exposed already for some time to scholarly scrutiny by the learned community.

In contrast to the Classics, the Neoclassics and Marx though, Schumpeter explicitly pins his interpretation of the economic process on the role or – in his own words – on the "leadership" of the entrepreneur: being depicted as an agent of change, of innovation and, thereby, of the very dynamics of long run development of a market-based system. Only later on – especially with the English translation in 1934 - this original notion of business "leadership" was popularised as the "pioneering" role (in the very first edition of the "Theory" being referred to by implication only, never explicitly so).

We shall refrain here from reiterating the widely known "five cases" or criteria of the Schumpeterian entrepreneur. Emphasis rather should be placed on pinpointing the not so obvious, the more hidden notion of what – in Schumpeter`s view – really is driving the market-oriented ("capitalist") process; of what, in the end, typifies its underlying dynamics as a kind of ingeniously perceived dialectical "paradox".

In neither classical-neoclassical nor Marxist visions, the entrepreneur explicitly figures. It is Schumpeter`s truly seminal interpretation of the capitalist process, wherein the entrepreneur as such takes centre stage as the "pioneering" driving force in a dialectic sense as, in fact, sort of villain, as the "antithesis" to the market system. As indeed an element constantly striving to outmanoeuvre constraining competition, to "trick" given market conditions and, thereby, forever to challenge "the system" itself, or more pointedly still: when and wherever possible to be, or to become, a monopolist.

In an essentially market-based context, this not only characterises the very nature and understanding of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship, it at the same time reveals the subtlety of its intrinsically underlying – and as such non-Marxist - dialectics.

Apart from Schumpeter`s subsequent more pessimistic outlook as to the sustainability of the entrepreneur`s ever so demanding role, his basic notion quite specifically also relates to, and as such emphasises, the particular socio-economic exposure under whichever conditions: in referring to the very challenging role of seizing the "kairos" of given opportunities, of carrying them through and bringing them to economic fruition. A role unavoidably fraught with risks, with unforeseeable human action and decisions which true entrepreneurship constantly is being faced with and unable to freely extricate or steal itself away from.

When relating this to modern entrepreneurship, its pivotal role in both a global and especially so in a structural as well as developmental context, Schumpeter`s vision nowadays, more than ever in times of dynamic change, may serve as a guide for any entrepreneurially oriented policy formulation.

For a policy geared to providing a framework conducive to entrepreneurial initiative and leadership, to fostering business opportunities for the benefit of society as a whole, or putting it somewhat differently: for creating conditions where doing business, in both its entrepreneurial and its socio-economic relevance, simply remains and is being recognised as rewarding an undertaking well worth the efforts going along with.
___________________
1Cf. his equally famous, Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy“, 1942.
Thumbnail17
Ensemble Innovations
Dr. Bruce E. Peoples,  Laboratoire Paragraphe,  Université Paris 8, France

Abstract
Innovation has been defined several different ways by different experts.  Some define Innovation as a “significant positive change” while others define it as “anything that is new, useful, and surprising”.  This presentation will focus on Ensemble Innovations…innovations that combine multiple existing innovations to create something never conceived of before that is useful and market disruptive.  The presentation will explore what Ensemble Innovations are and how they come to life.  An example Ensemble Innovation dealing with assessing reading skills will be given along with supporting inventions needed to effectively implement the resultant innovation.
Thumbnail18
Second-Order Science and Science from within - Significant Differences and Perspectives
Dr. Karl H. Müller, Director of The Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics, Vienna, Austria / Professor at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract
In recent years a significant number of differentiations of science have been put forward like Science I & II, first-order science & second-order science, Science 1.0 and Science 2.0, first-order cybernetics  second-order cybernetics, etc. All these separations point to great transformations as well as to new architecture of the overall science system. The lecture will be divided into three main parts.
  • The first part lays out the new environments of second-order science and emphasizes the new configuration of first-order science as the science as we know it and the two new levels and types, namely zero-order science with its concentration on research infrastructures and second-order science which operates on the building blocks from first-order science like models, theories, test results, theoretical concepts or other inputs or outputs from first-order science.
  • The second part focuses on new and highly innovative perspectives for second-order science which go very far beyond well-established practices like meta-analyses or systematic literature reviews.
  • Finally, the third part focuses on a significant new major reflexive inversion within the science system, namely to a shift in epistemic modes from a traditional approach from without (exo-mode) to a new mode from within (endo-mode). In combination, second-order science and the endo-mode constitute a new Copernican revolution. It will be shown that this new Copernican revolution can be characterized as a joint complexity and reflexivity revolution within the overall science system.

Literature:
Malnar, B., Müller, K.H. (2015), Surveys and Reflexivity. A Second-Order Analysis of the European Social Survey (ESS). Wien:edition echoraum
Müller, K.H. (2016), Second-Order Science. The Revolution of Scientific Structures. Wien:edition echoraum
Müller, K.H., Riegler, A. (2014b), „Second-Order Science: A Vast and Largely Unexplored Science Frontier”, in: Constructivist Foundations, vol. 10, no. 1, 7 – 15
Thumbnail19
Pedagogy of Paradigms: Education Enrichment with Ethos, Pathos & Logos
Dr. Marta Szabo White, Director of the Study Abroad in Transition Economies, Director of Business Learning Community, Director of the Program Business Mediterranean Style, Georgia State University, USA

Abstract
The model from the conference website [1], coupled with Kuhn’s [2] work on paradigms and Isaac’s [3] interpretation of Kuhn’s work, serve as the inspiration for this plenary address.

In the first model, cybernetic loops are modified through feedback loops, linking with “Academic Globalization” and “Inter-Cultural Communication”, which are supported by Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics [1]. Celebrating these cornerstones, and their support of pivotal relationships, this paper draws upon Kuhn’s structure of paradigms in Aristotle’s terms of ethos, pathos and logos [4], [5], & [6], and Isaac’s analysis [3] to propose a Creative Destructive [7] process, enriching education through paradigms.

References

[1] Symposium on Academic Globalization and Inter-Cultural Communication: AGIC 2016, http://www.iiis2016.org/wmsci/website/about.asp?vc=22

[2] Kuhn, T.S. [1996]. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. [3rd Ed.] Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

[3] Isaac, J. [2012].Kuhn’s Education: Wittgenstein, Pedagogy, and the Road to Structure. Modern Intellectual History, 9, 1, pp. 89–107 © Cambridge University Press 2012 doi: 10.1017/S1479244311000497
https://www.academia.edu/8285253/Kuhns_Education_Wittgenstein_Pedagogy_and_the_Road_to_Structure_

[4] Ramage, J.D. & Bean, J.C. [1998]. Writing Arguments. [4th Ed.]. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon. pp 81-82.

[5] Sproat, E., Driscoll, D.L. & Brizee, A. [2012]. Aristotle's Rhetorical Situation. Copyright ©1995-2014 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University.
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/625/03/
Accessed February 15, 2014.

[6] White, M.S., [2015] “Academic Ethos, Pathos, and Logos Intersect with Innovation and Entrepreneurship.” Plenary Keynote Session Academic Globalization: Proceedings of the 19th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics
Thumbnail20
Entrepreneurship Education, an Experiential Journey
Dr. Doug Sparkes, P.Eng, Associate Director, Undergraduate Programs, Conrad Business Entrepreneurship and Technology Centre, University of Waterloo, Canada

Abstract
The University of Waterloo and the Region of Waterloo have established a reputation as a leader in Canadian Entrepreneurship. This presentation provides an overview of the evolution of entrepreneurship programs within Waterloo’s Conrad Centre, and how the lessons learned have shaped their development. Through our own journey, we have come to understand many of aspects of the programs that are important for entrepreneurship education and how they impact the student’s personal entrepreneurial journeys.
Thumbnail21
Mobile Computation of Barrier-free Routes for Mobility Impaired Users via Voice Control
Professor Bettina Harriehausen-Mühlbauer, Computer Science Department, University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Abstract
Modern information technology can improve life for people with special needs. Mobility impaired people are often confronted with barriers along their chosen routes which lead to unreachable destinations and frustration. Not only outdoor barriers, such as steep ramps, stairs, or uneven surface conditions are often insurmountable for mobility impaired users, but also indoor barriers, such as broken elevators, can lead to unreachable destinations. We have developed a mobile application which computes and displays barrier-free routes between outdoor or indoor locations in case barriers are detected along the shortest route. Our multi-modal interface includes voice control.
Thumbnail22
A Transfer-Based Framework for Inter-Disciplinary Communication, Teaching, and Research
Dr. Denise K. Comer, Director of First-Year Writing in the Thompson Writing Program and Founding Director of the Duke-Ronald McDonald House of Durham Family Story Project, Duke University, USA

Abstract
A Transfer-Based Framework for Inter-Disciplinary Communication, Teaching, and Research This talk foregrounds transfer as a crucial framework for navigating the dynamic, intersecting, and disparate contexts of academia. A transfer framework invites faculty, administrators, and students to actively engage with, reflect on, and position themselves within and across those varying and overlapping domains. Doing so can facilitate increased networks of collaboration, more robust advances in knowledge and research methods, improved pedagogy, and increased student learning gains.
Thumbnail23
How to Learn Multidisciplinary Design: Biomedical Engineering in Cross Cultural Seminar
Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Doctor of Engineering and Doctor of Medicine, Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan

Abstract
“Biomedical Engineering” is exemplified for multidisciplinary field.  “Biomedical Engineering” makes the multidisciplinary research area, which includes biology, medicine, engineering, and others.  The cross-cultural student seminars on biomedical engineering have been exemplified as the case studies.  In the group work, students are divided into the small cross cultural groups.  Each group finds a problem, methods to solve the problem, contribution to the society.  Presentations are made using information in the internet.  They have learned how to communicate with students, who has variety of cultural backgrounds.  The training awakes in students several points: thinking from a different point of view, variation of communication tools.  The process is effective to learn multidisciplinary design.
Thumbnail24
Vladimir Lefebvre’s Theory of Two Systems of Ethical Cognition
Professor Emeritus Stuart A. Umpleby, Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning, The George Washington University, USA / Former President of The American Society of Cybernetics, USA

Abstract
In his 1982 book Algebra of Conscience Vladimir Lefebvre contended that the dominant ethical systems in the West and the Soviet Union were fundamentally different.   However, people on each side usually assume that there is only one type of ethical reasoning.  The result is that each side takes actions that are misunderstood by the other side.  With the guidance of Lefebvre's theory it became possible for both sides to take actions which, although counterintuitive in their own thinking, could lead to more success in negotiations and a reduction in armaments.  Luckily, Lefebvre’s theory was used at the highest levels of the governments of the US and the Soviet Union during the break-up of the Soviet Union.  This presentation will explain how Lefebvre’s theory can be used in negotiations between governments, between businesses, and between individuals.  The theory explains some of the difficulties encountered in the transitions in the post-communist countries.  It may prove helpful in negotiating with extremist groups in the Middle East and Africa.
Thumbnail25
Updating Antique Chinese Knowledge
Professor Gabriel Felley, Head of the Competence Centre IT Management and Governance, School of Business, Institute for Information Systems, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland

Abstract
The Western culture and its established paradigms lead the world economy and structure the global market. The backbone of this culture roots in a technocratic vision of the world, based on the principle of causality. This understanding of the economic and societal reality has shown great success with continuous achievements. Nevertheless, today our society is facing big problems. More specifically, the globalization of markets has substantially complicated the process of making the right decisions. A different approach to problem solving may help design a better solution. This approach has to overstep the too obvious true-false logic and offer a holistic frame for a new way of analyzing the economic and social realms. Looking back at the ancient Chinese philosophers, they had developed an astonishing methodology called the Yijing, which was used to support government officials in making the right decisions. This article attempts to link the PDCA Deming cycle to some special elements of this framework.
Thumbnail26
Engaging Online Learners in a Synchronous Environment
Professor Ronald A. Styron, Jr., Educational Leadership Program Coordinator, Director of the Quality Enhancement Plan, University of South Alabama, USA
Dr. Jennifer Styron, Educational Leadership Program Coordinator, College of Nursing, University of South Alabama. USA / Former Research Specialist and Distance Education Coordinator at The University of Southern Mississippi, USA


Abstract
This presentation will focus on the use of four technologies aimed at fostering student engagement in virtual learning environments. These technologies, the Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness (CATME), InteDashboard, VoiceThread, and WebEx are deployed in a synchronous virtual learning environment. All four promote active learning and have been found to improve the acquisition and retention of content by promoting meaningful discussion and the sharing of information.
Thumbnail27
How Globalized Academics Articulate
Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus, Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA / CEO of Inventor's Assistance League, USA

Abstract
We academics may not realize that we are a privileged lot. We often assume literacy, intelligence, and a “normal” level of critical thinking. A reality check is in order, given statistics that show 50% of the US population is reading below the 8th grade level. All about us, events seem to be confirm that traditional and acceptable ways of coping with world problems are breaking down, largely because of the population quality, one that is not sufficient to meet today's social needs. Academics often have been accused of only residing in “ivory towers”, far away from the unwashed and untutored. Scholars have been both on dark sides (Nazi Germany, being an example) and more enlightened ones (mainly in science) in creating and sustaining social systems. Until modern times (starting in the mid-19th century, with the onrush of globalization), serious social problems could be contained, their effects being minimized to a local area. Since the US Civil War, World War I, and surely World War II, just about any event involving more than two countries reverberates worldwide. Worldwide stability cannot tolerate a country's leadership fraught with substandard capacities. Increased planetary interdependence illustrates rising complexity. Yet, this dynamic organic system is not healthy.

Academics throughout history have been charged with solving social problems, but the ambient complexity may have exceeded our ability to manage it. Traditionally, even the experts have had to create tools to aid them in problem solving, and the current situation is no exception. Not only are interdisciplinary efforts desirable, they are requisite for any solution that is purported to meet heterogeneous needs. Artificial intelligence to date has been largely confined to individual problems (“THE” brain, a specific application, etc.).

However, in light of the need to meet social complexity and our apparent native inability to manage it, again, we may have to create a tool to do so, in effect, reinventing ourselves. Here, I introduce a new highly interdisciplinary approach – arguably a totality of disciplines, socio-intelligence. This presentation, followed by publications (some scheduled to be released in 2017), will elaborate.
Thumbnail28
Training and Education: Is Training Education? Is Education Training? eLearning, Hybrid, and Face-to-Face Modalities - A Participatory Debate
Dr. Risa Blair, College of Arts and Sciences, Grantham University, USA / eLearning Instructional Designer, Kaplan University, USA

Abstract
Are training and education synonymous? Why or why not? What is the current status and preferred delivery method of education and training in the university setting? In terms of eLearning, face-to-face learning, and hybrid learning, have the educational delivery modalities become equalized? What is the expectation of our millennial students, Gen Y and Gen Z students? Perhaps, even more importantly, what is the expectation of the administration and the accrediting bodies? How do we achieve our educational goals?
Thumbnail29
Varieties of Contemporary Second-Order Cybernetics
Dr. Karl H. Müller, Director of The Steinbeis Transfer Center New Cybernetics, Vienna, Austria / Professor at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Abstract
Second-order cybernetics was developed, following Ranulph Glanville, in the period between 1968 and 1975 by authors like Heinz von Foerster, Gordon Pask, Louis H. Kauffman or Ranulph Glanville himself. Even forty years after the emergence of second-order cybernetics its scope and dimensions remain rather unclear. On the contrary, the argument has been made recently that the road from first-order to second-order cybernetics was unsuccessful at best and a blind alley from the start (Kline, 2015)

However, looking at contemporary authors like Louis H. Kauffman, Stuart A. Umpleby, Bernard Scott and others a surprisingly coherent and strong research agenda can be built for second-order cybernetics for today’s science landscapes. The lecture provides a fresh and rather new summary on the mostly unfulfilled research program of second-order cybernetics.

Literature:
Kline R.R. (2015) The Cybernetics Moment or Why We Call our Age the Information Age. Baltimore:The Johns Hopkins University Press
Riegler, A., Müller, K.H. (2016)(eds.), Varieties of Second-Order Cybernetics. Special Issue of Constructivist Foundations, 11(3)
Thumbnail30
Engineering Research and Innovation for the Integration of Academy and Society
Dr. Luis Velazquez-Araque, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, University of Guayaquil, Ecuador / Founder of the Aerodynamics Laboratory at National University of Tachira, Venezuela

Abstract
The main role given to engineering research and innovation towards a smart, sustainable and inclusive growth in the world, means that academic and scientific institutions make full use of their human capital, thereby involving both men and women. Evidence shows that promoting gender equality at all levels contributes to achieving excellence and efficiency in research and innovation performance. Although some initiatives have been developed in Europe and the US for several years, they have proved to be insufficient and have not helped to address the structural barriers contributing to the leaky pipeline phenomenon. This has led to a shift in focus towards addressing the structural transformation of institutions, using a systemic, comprehensive and sustainable approach.

An exhaustive analysis of the role that scientific and academic institutions must play in order to enhance integration of academy and society for a structural change is made, so that decision making is more transparent, unconscious bias is removed from institutional practices, human resources management is modernized, excellence is promoted through diversity, and research and innovation are improved by the integration of diverse perspectives. While a lead is required from government institutions, a wider range of actors also need to play an active role in renovating the way in which research and innovation is conducted in all countries.
Thumbnail31
Formación de Recursos Humanos y Gestión de Proyectos de Investigación Multidisciplinar en Ambientes Mediados
Profesora Gabriela Vilanova, Directora de Proyectos en Ingeniería de Software, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Argentina
Profesor Jorge Varas, Co-Director de Proyectos en Ergonomía Organizacional, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Argentina


Abstract
En la actual sociedad del conocimiento las exigencias sobre formación permanente son constantes, es necesario contar con personas formadas, reflexivas y con pensamiento crítico, que sean capaces de realizar las transformaciones necesarias dentro del lugar donde se desempeñan como profesionales.

Enfrentarse a los nuevos retos que plantea la sociedad actual requiere que el investigador no necesite ser solo un experto en un área en particular, sino que debe poseer múltiples habilidades y competencias básicas. Entre esas habilidades se encuentra el trabajo en equipo, la comunicación en ambientes mediados y la construcción de conocimiento colaborativo en red.
Thumbnail32
El Docente y las Tecnologías Utilizadas en el Aula
Dra. María Dolores García Perea, Investigadora en Educación, Instituto Superior de Ciencias de la Educación del Estado de México

Abstract
El presente trabajo, además de tener dos objetos de estudio - el docente y las tecnologías que utiliza en el aula escolar-, tiene como objetivos analizar: los procesos de transformación irreversibles que existen en ambos, el impacto, beneficios y críticas sobre la utilización de las tecnologías en la educación y el empoderamiento que otorga las tecnologías al docente cuando éste se ha alfabetizado.

Las tecnologías en el aula han sido y siguen siendo un tema insoslayable e impostergable en la educación mexicana debido a los beneficios y ventajas que ofrecen cuando son utilizados por los docentes para organizar, planificar y gestionar los procesos de enseñanza y por los estudiantes para fomentar, incrementar y garantizar los procesos de aprendizaje y la gestión del conocimiento.

También, han sido severamente criticadas, no tanto por su potencial informativo y de comunicación, de aprendizaje y conocimiento, para el empoderamiento y la participación, sino por las actitudes de los docentes de concebirlas como fines cuando solamente son un medio y de sublimarlas y convertirlas en la panacea de solución a los problemas educativos y sociales cuando solo son parte de la cultura y jamás la podrán sustituir.

Las transformaciones que ha sufrido tanto las tecnologías en el aula escolar como algunas de las funciones realizadas por el docente, son irreversibles y difíciles de ignorar, porque ambos están implicados en la tarea de educar, porque las tecnologías han sido creadas para utilizarse como dispositivos para fomentar e incrementar el aprendizaje y la gestión del conocimiento y el docente tiene que generar rupturas en sus patrones culturales para familiarizarse, dominarlas y convertirlas en dispositivos educativos y de formación.

Identificar el vínculo que tienen las tecnologías utilizadas en el aula por parte de los docentes, desde la educación tradicional hasta la educación oblicua, implica reconocer que la transformación de las tecnologías generada por su evolución, jamás podrá ser paralela a los procesos de formación del docente, debido a que las webs impulsan la creación continua, progresiva y permanente de las tecnologías y herramientas tecnológicas utilizadas en el aula, y que la crisis del docente para alfabetizarse, se debe, no solo a la infoxicación que genera el internet, sino también a los procesos de cambio, adaptación y desfase que tiene que enfrentar para estar acorde a los avances tecnológicos.
Thumbnail33
Integración de la Investigación, la Educación y la Solución de Problemas de la Vida Real
Profesor Andres Tremante, The Mechanical & Materials Engineering (MME) Department, Florida International University, USA

Abstract
Existe una creciente necesidad académica y social en cuanto a la integración de las actividades académicas entre ellas mismas y con la sociedad, incluyendo el sector público y privado. Un número creciente de académicos ha venido notando y haciendo notar la necesidad de integrar la investigación, la educación y la solución de problemas entre ellas mismas y con los problemas sociales, industriales y organizacionales. Esta integración es especialmente importante y urgente en los países en vías de desarrollo para ir alcanzando un desarrollo suficientemente sustentable para los efectos de mejorar la calidad de vida dentro y fuera del mundo académico. En este sentido las Tecnologías de Información y Comunicación proveen un adecuado soporte conceptual, metodológico e instrumental para los efectos de una mayor efectividad y eficiencia en la mencionada doble integración. Las llamadas "Informing Sciences" son parte importante del soporte de los procesos de integración de la investigación, la educación y la extensión universitaria (incluyendo la consultoría y la solución de problemas de la vida real). En ese contexto, profesor Andrés Tremante presentará un ejemplo de una organización que se creó en Venezuela hace cerca de 40 años y que viene cumpliendo adecuadamente esa función, a pesar de la situación del país en los últimos años.