Thumbnail1
Developing and Using Cybersecurity Discussion Case Studies (Participatory Workshop - Part 1 of 2)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.

Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:

Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.

Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Thumbnail2
Developing and Using Cybersecurity Discussion Case Studies (Participatory Workshop - Part 2 of 2)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.

Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:

Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.

Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Thumbnail3
Strategic Planning for the Second Half of Your Life (Participatory Workshop)
Dr. Ira Blatstein, Division of Public Safety Leadership, School of Education, John Hopkins University, USA / USA Presidential Rank Distinguished Award, and USA Presidential Rank Meritorious Award.

Abstract
Increased life expectancy has led to increased opportunities for multiple careers, hobbies, and interests over a person' s lifetime. In this workshop, individuals will engage in a very brief version of a strategic planning process for developing a long-range perspective on their future.
Thumbnail4
The Educational Features of Peer Review (Conversational Session)
Co-Facilitators: Dr. Risa Blair, Kaplan University, USA / Instructional Associates, LLC, Miami Shores, FL, USA; and Drs. Nanda van der Stap, Blended Laboratory, University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Abstract
Peer Review presents itself as a win/win for teachers and students, alike - whether at the undergraduate or graduate level - or does it? Do students really learn from peer review? Is it an "easy" path for a professor to take to avoid developing strong lectures or provide solid assessments? Some may argue this point. This conversational session will address these points, as well as the benefits of peer review to students, as well as the professor. We attack the concept of peer review from all sides. Be prepared to actively participate in the conversation! This topic might be taken as an example of the a following invited session regarding the importance of explicitly relating Episteme with Doxa, knowledge with opinion, justified with not justified believes, explicit with implicit knowledge.
Thumbnail5
Closing the Loop: Incorporating Student-Developed Content into the Curriculum
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
How many thousand hours of effort are lost as the student-develobred content vanishes into oblivion at the end of each semester? Admittedly, much of the content we see as instructors likely deserves not to see the light of day. Unfortunately, both students and instructors are aware of this. And, being brressed for time, we calibrate our exbrectations accordingly. But what would habrbren if we were to design our assignments with the sbrecific goal of having the work created in one class become brart of the curriculum of the next?

The focus of this brresentation is our exbreriences in develobring assignments that are intended for use in subsequent classes. Two exambrles are brresented. The first is a debate activity. Master’s students were assigned to create chabrters in a book that was built around ten debate resolutions such as:

Within 50 years, we can exbrect to see information technologies brroduce systems that are cabrable of the same tybre of flexible, common sense reasoning that humans alone are cabrable of today.

This book of student work was subsequently brublished and has been used for several years in the cabrstone course for the Business Analytics and Information Systems master’s brrogram at the University of South Florida.

The second exambrle involves the student develobrment of discussion case studies of local organizations. At the moment, courses in three different brrograms (the MBA, EMBA, and DBA) all require students to develobr case studies suitable for eventual brublication and use in the classroom. A substantial fraction of these cases has either been brublished or are in the brublication bribreline. Moreover, at least one course is using these cases as its brrincibral source of content.

Having students develobr work at a level of quality suitable for subsequent reuse is not without its challenges. As brart of the brresentation, a number of challenges that we have encountered will be identified. How we have tried to address these challenges, including abrbrroaches to break down the brrocess into manageable chunks, incorbrorating breer-review into the editorial brrocess, identifying—and, if necessary, creating—suitable outlets for the work, and motivating students, will also be discussed. Finally, the brotential learning outcome benefits of this brrocess will be considered, and some evidence of effectiveness will be brresented.
Thumbnail6
On-line E-portfolios in Higher Education -A Multidisciplinary Approach
Professors William Slattery and Suzanne Lunsford, Wright State University, USA

Abstract
Professional development programs for in-service teachers is a three-phase long-term event designed to increase the integrated science content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge of teams of K-12 teachers in high need Local Education Agency (LEA). The main schools selected are high need areas with an overall average from school districts serving a population of 63% students who are economically disadvantaged. The teachers participating serve as catalysts and mentors to other teachers, and will drive curriculum change in the district with the production of E-portfolios. The multidisciplinary approach of this program is composed of three phases; Phase I -field experiences/lab experiences, Phase II -on-line internet experiences where the E-portfolios are developed and implemented and Phase III -web conferences to continue the development of the E-portfolios and assess students learning gains in content. Teachers participating in these programs will be agents of change, leading their districts' efforts to produce scientifically literate students now and a citizenry well versed in the skills that will be needed to ensure Ohio' s economic future.
Thumbnail7
On Social Engineering Attacks and Unintended Data Disclosures: Two Major Categories of End-User Cybersecurity Error
Professor John Coffey, University of West Florida, Computer Science Department, USA / Research Scientist at Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, USA.

Abstract
End user error continues to be a significant root cause of cybersecurity breaches. Despite widespread progress in the establishment of training for end users and a slight downward trend in end user error-mediated compromises as a percentage of total successful attacks and data breaches, the absolute number of successful attacks continues to trend upward. This talk will provide details regarding two major categories of end user error: failure to detect social engineering attacks and unintended data disclosures not resulting from social engineering attacks.

Modern social engineering attacks are sophisticated occurrences that bear little resemblance to early, primitive phishing exploits. This talk will address the evolution of social engineering attacks, modern forms, and attributes of susceptible users, including the important role of social media in helping attackers create highly targeted attacks.

Significant amounts of sensitive data continue to be exposed by unintended data disclosures not precipitated by social engineering attacks. While organizations are awash in broad guidelines for the implementation of training programs, most guidelines do not provide details on the most common and most damaging types of breaches. A detailed analysis of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse database of data breaches reveals patterns of errors that end users make that can inform highly targeted training programs. Summarization of detailed data in service of more focused end-user training is one goal of this proposed talk.
Thumbnail8
Generation Z Students: Will They Change Our Classrooms?
Dr. Lila Rajabion, College of Business, University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee, USA

Abstract
A new generation of students (Generation Z) born after 1995 are arriving on our college campuses. The Generation Z students have been termed as the "screensters," "internet generation" and the "digital natives." They are first generation of students to be born in an environment that is extremely internet-connected and tech-savvy. What makes them unique? What are the best ways to motivate them?, what are the implications for computer science and IT educators? What are the appropriate learning strategies to use to motivate Generation Z students.
Thumbnail9
Design Science Research: Bridging Rigor and Relevance
Professor Donald Ropes, Business Research Centre, Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands

Abstract
The point of this talk is to explain the Design Science Research approach as a way to bridge the rigor-relevance gap present in much of scientific work. In the presentation I discuss how explanatory sciences such as Sociology or Physics are mono-disciplinary in nature and aim to produce outcomes that contribute to the body of knowledge specific to that discipline. In these fields methodological rigor is crucial in order to support the knowledge claims generated. However, this means limiting the research to perhaps just one variable while eliminating any influence of the research context. Thus, assuring rigor generally means sacrificing practical relevance. Design Science Research, on the other hand, is a multidisciplinary approach aimed at generating actionable knowledge - that which is both rigorous and relevant for practice.
Thumbnail10
Mobile Application Development: Should We Bother with Systems Development Methodologies?
Professor Magda Huisman, School of Computer, Statistical and Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), South Africa

Abstract
With the increase in the adoption of mobile devices, the demand for mobile applications also increases. While some mobile applications are very successful, others fail. In this paper we will try to answer the question: "What factors influence the success of mobile applications, and is the use of systems development methodologies one of these factors?" To answer this question, we will focus on the user acceptance of mobile applications and the development process of mobile applications. The factors (positive and negative) that influence user acceptance of mobile applications will be presented, as well as the results of a study on the use and effectiveness of systems development methodologies during mobile application development.
Thumbnail11
Can Less Teaching Bring more Learning? Leveraging Learning through Feedback.
Professor Anastassis Kozanitis, Department of Didactics, Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada.

Abstract
In line with higher education' s shift from teaching to learning, we emphasise the reasons why instructors should design teaching and learning activities that provide students with opportunities to reflect on how and what they are learning. There are three main takeaways we wish to communicate: 1) learning is facilitated when the context and object of learning make sense to the learner; 2) innovation and technology should leverage pedagogy; 3) active learning pedagogies have proven more efficient.
Thumbnail12
The Power of Effective Collaboration between Industry and Academia
Dr. Maureen Lucy Schafer, Georgetown University, USA / Clinical Informatics SME: Reviewed and wrote the DoD Common Military Training Curriculum / Defense Health Agency / Research and Development / 27-years US Army Veteran.

Abstract
Many healthcare systems that provide the interweaving framework of people, physical structures and electronic systems to support the application mandate of best practices seemingly changes from one organization to the next. Ultimately, it creates a lack of standardization, cumbersome processes, user frustration, and unreliable outcome metrics. The reliance in developing new systems is then based on thought leadership at that point in time rather than applying science to guide the system innovation or practice. The challenge is to move us collectively from thought leadership to project implementation framed and acted upon via evidenced based science. Inherent in this change is to specialize the blending the best of both industry and academia' s priority variables. Merging the domains of industry and academia as collaborative coauthors in new system development supports project management threaded with validated and evidence-based practices.
Thumbnail13
Strategic Planning for The Second Half of Your Life
Dr. Ira Blatstein, Division of Public Safety Leadership, School of Education, John Hopkins University, USA / USA Presidential Rank Distinguished Award, and USA Presidential Rank Meritorious Award.

Abstract
In a previous article, the author discussed strategic planning and its application to a variety of organizations. This article extends the application of these strategic planning principles to an individual' s life. Increased life expectancy is leading to the desire/requirement to plan well beyond the end of an individual' s traditional first career. The paper delves into application of strategic planning to plan the second half of an individual' s life.

It also discusses the incorporation of these ideas into strategic planning classes. Finally the article reports on the results of a survey that has been used to assess the impact that this planning has on students' perspectives on their future and on strategic planning. Key conclusions of the paper are: 1) Doing this type of planning makes individuals feel positive about the future. They are more likely, I believe, to respond to opportunities as they arise. 2) After doing the planning, a larger number of respondents expect to involve other people in the development of their plans. 3) Many of the respondents did not have any personal strategic plan prepared before they did the one in this class. 4) A large majority of the respondents were impacted by the planning process. They either changed their plans, took specific actions, or changed their approach to planning overall. 5) The course and plan development altered many individuals view of their plan and planning.
Thumbnail14
Humboldt's Vision of a Smart(er) World
Professor Detlev Doherr, Dean of the Bachelor Degree Programs, Head of the Institute of Continuing Academic Education, Offenburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany / Director of the Steinbeis Transfer Center of Information Technologies, Offenburg, Germany

Abstract
In the 19th century Alexander von Humboldt explored nature and was conceived a new vision of natural world that still influences our understanding of the nature itself. Since then the technical world has developed dramatically and influences our relationship to nature and our handling of the complexity and diversity of nature.

This presentation describes aspects of Humboldt' s vision of the natural world and consequences for a smarter world, which we likely are implementing by super computers under the risk of a technical colonialism by high developed computer intelligence in conflict with humanity.
Thumbnail15
Implementing Hybrid Education: Short-Term and Long-Term Considerations
Professor Ronda C. Sturgill, Director of the Exercise and Nutrition Science Program, College of Natural and Health Sciences, University of Tampa, USA

Abstract
Implementation of a graduate program is a timely process. Hybrid education provides another layer of complexity when starting a program. Both short-term and long-term considerations are critical during the implementation phase. This presentation will discuss the short-term considerations including faculty, communication, and resource availability. Long-term considerations presented include adaptability, continued communication, and continued allocation of resources. Challenges, lessons learned, and future recommendations of implementing a hybrid delivered graduate program will be discussed.
Thumbnail16
Teaching (Software) Project Management Using LEGO Bricks
Professor Herwig Mayr, Head of the Department of Project Engineering, Program Coordinator, of the FH Master and Program Biomedical Computer Science, University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, Hagenberg, Austria

Abstract
We illustrate how Action Learning concepts can be integrated into project management courses using LEGO bricks, varying from LEGO Mindstorms sets, over LEGO 4 Scrum and LEGO Creationary, to LEGO Serious Play. Thus, LEGO can both be used for teaching product and process aspects in various lectures at bachelor and master level. We give specific examples and report on our findings and feedback from teachers and students as well.
Thumbnail17
How to Measure the Unmeasurable – The Nature of Composite Indices and Their Application in Educational Research
Dr. Pawel Poszytek, Ministry of National Education of the Republic of Poland / General director and president of the board of the Foundation for the Development of the Education System

Abstract
The present world is flooded by various kinds of indices. They aim at describing the reality, however rarely do we discuss about the limitations they pose. On the one hand, composite indicators by their nature:

• can summarise complex or multi-dimensional issues in view of supporting decision-makers
• are easier to interpret than trying to find a trend in many separate indicators
• facilitate the task of ranking countries on complex issues in a benchmarking exercise
• can assess progress of countries over time on complex issues
• reduce the size of a set of indicators or include more information within the existing size limit
• place issues of country performance and progress at the centre of the policy arena
• facilitate communication with general public (i.e. citizens, media, etc.) and promote accountability.

On the other hand, they can lead to creating misleading policy messages and simplistic policy conclusions, disguising serious failings and leading to inappropriate policies, misuse, and political influence. How to avoid these threats? The author will give two examples of educational research projects where these obstacles have been encountered and surmounted.
Thumbnail18
Designing a Doctoral Program to Bridge the Gap between the Academy and Industry
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
A Doctoral program was designed and implemented at the University of South Florida, USA, with the explicit objective of relating and bridging the gap between academy and industry.

In this presentation the principal features of the design of this doctorate will be presented. These are mainly:

• Admissions requirements
• Creating a practice-focused curriculum
• Breaking down departmental silos
• Building flexibility into the design
• Encouraging/Requiring integrative activities
• Maintaining the relationship after graduation

At the end of the presentation, findings from the first three years of its implementation will be summarized.
Thumbnail19
Globalization and Higher Education
Professor Mohammad Ilyas, Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Florida Atlantic University, USA / Former Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science and Member of Global Engineering Deans Council.

Abstract
Globalization is an evolving phenomenon pushing for greater integration among nations in terms of trade, culture, economics, politics, and more. Higher education is not only influenced by the forces of globalization, it is also influences the globalization phenomenon. In this presentation, we will briefly discuss the following aspects:

• Globalization – its brief history, nature, and many faces
• Impact of globalization on higher education
• Emerging needs for global competencies
• Measuring globalization in academic institutions
• Challenges and opportunities for Universities in addressing globalization
Thumbnail20
The Role of Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Academic Globalization
Dr. Houman A. Sadri, Political Science Department, University of Central Florida, USA / Founder and President of the Information & Policy Analysis Center, Inc. (IPAC)
Dr. Madelyn Flammia, Professor in International Technical Communications, University of Central Florida, USA / Vicepresident of the Information & Policy Analysis Center, Inc. (IPAC)


Abstract
The presenters will discuss strategies for forming interdisciplinary collaborations among faculty members for the purpose of internationalizing the curriculum in institutions of higher education. While most administrators and faculty agree that globalization is an important goal for colleges and universities, many still find it challenging to develop the means to internationalize the curriculum and to enhance students’ global competency.

The presenters will begin by describing their own experiences collaborating across disciplines. Then they will offer concrete suggestions for establishing interdisciplinary and international collaborations among faculty members. They will cover the challenges associated with such collaborations, including:
  • Identifying colleagues with whom to collaborate
  • Developing collaborative projects that fit into existing courses
  • Establishing methods for meeting course objectives in diverse disciplines
  • Developing new interdisciplinary courses
  • Helping students think beyond disciplinary boundaries
  • Identifying international partners
  • Coordinating schedules and working across time zones
  • Fostering students’ ability to think globally and act locally
The presenters will then offer strategies for addressing these challenges by drawing on their own collaborations, on the work of their colleagues, and on case studies and other research reporting on such collaborations
Thumbnail21
An Exploration of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Properties and Implications for Practice
Professor Paul Nugent, Management Information Systems, Western Connecticut State University, USA / International Association for Computer Information Systems, Member of the Editorial Review Board

Abstract
This talk considers the qualitative differences between extrinsic and intrinsic properties and argues that there is a strong bias in science and engineering toward extrinsic properties. This imbalance can lead to excessive reductionism and a constrained view of objects as functions that can lead to problems in system modeling and design. The restoration of balance through an acknowledgment of intrinsic properties is explored.
Thumbnail22
Management of Learning - Implications from Needs and Emotions for Learning Processes in a Digital Future
Dr. Benjamin Apelojg, University of Potsdam, Germany

Abstract
The fast technical development of digitization leads to changed learning environments. The future of learning will be more and more digital and virtual. These changes call for new didactic concepts and models that meet the requirements of a “digital learning world”. The presentation initially raises the thesis that learning environments are becoming increasingly complex and dynamic. Self-regulated and collaborative learning will increase. In the presentation examples for digital learning environments and their advantages and disadvantages are given. In progress of the lecture will be shown that next to organizational and content issues needs and emotions play an important role in digital learning environments. Negative emotions and missing needs can interrupt and disturb learning processes. Positive Emotions and fulfilled needs can be helpful for the learning process. The management of learning in a digital age should focus on one side on the process of learning (https://www.unipotsdam.de/fileadmin01/projects/meprooek/Kompetenzmodell_der_ökonomischen_Bildung/Process-orientedDidactics_online.pdf Process-orientated-didactics Apelojg 2015) to deal with complexity and dynamics of future learning and on the other side integrate emerging needs and emotions into the process of learning. At the end of the lecture future demands on teachers will be discussed.
Thumbnail23
Publish OR Perish Can Become Publish AND Perish in the Age of Objective Assessment of Scientific Quality
Dr. Habil. Erzsebet Dani, Department of Library Science and Informatics, Faculty of Informatics and Computer Science, University of Debrecen, Hungary

Abstract
Many have called and keep calling attention to the rigid and uniform application of the numerical approach, arguing that it is doing injustice to certain areas of science. My study is intended to serve two purposes: I wish to call attention to how extremely harmful the present scientometric practice may be for many scholars and scientists; I propose to demonstrate how the crucial contradiction in question at the core of the present practice follows from the myths generated by scientometry itself.
Thumbnail24
Building Collaboration and Partnerships between Research and Practice: The Case of Designing a District Technology Plan
Dr. Lorayne Robertson, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), Canada / Former Assistant Dean in the Faculty of Education / Former Director of the Graduate Programs in Education
Ms. Laurie Corrigan, Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington District School Board, Canada / Superintendent of Learning and Innovation Technologies


Abstract
As online technologies become ubiquitous in students' lives outside of school, the academy becomes engaged in assessing the impact of emergent pedagogies on student learning. School districts design policies and programs to develop students' 21st century skills in safe learning environments. Multiple practical, theoretical, and policy considerations underlie the formulation of a school district' s technology plan. Optimal outcomes of planning can be realized through productive research-practice partnerships to share knowledge and broker stakeholder input into this collective and significant enterprise. In this keynote presentation, we describe the steps undertaken in one school district to create collaborative professional learning team in a school district. Employing an evidence-based approach, we analyzed the outcomes of the district' s previous technology plan and planned forward for technology-enabled learning for the district. Practical elements included allocations of personnel and resources. Theoretical elements were wide-ranging and included theoretical considerations of equity, capacity-building, innovative pedagogies, and connected learning.
Thumbnail25
Real World Experience: Developing Novel Sensors – An Interdisciplinary Approach
Professor Suzanne Lunsford, Wright State University, USA

Abstract
The development of environmental sensors to detect harmful heavy metals and phenols in water have been an increased concern in the last few years. Our interdisciplinary approach to an inquiry -based lab experiences with the development of modified electrode sensors to detect heavy metals and phenols simultaneously without the need for prior separation has built a stronger tie to real world issues. The problem-based approach of how to develop an electrochemical sensor for heavy metal detection has gained momentum due to increased exposure to Lead (Pb) and Cadmium (Cd). Pb and Cd are neurotoxins in children with chronic exposure and there is a need for a reliable method to analyze heavy metals (Lead and Cadmium) in environmental and biological samples. Thus electrochemical techniques were integrated with the development of Carbon Nanotubes with selective polymers modified on to electrode surfaces with nanoparticles to enhance the detection of phenols and heavy metals will be discussed with real-world applications integrated with industry. The students have shown an enhancement in content knowledge gains with the problem-based real-world analysis of sensor development compared to the lecture based format of teaching. Also, students' collaboration among different universities/departments and industrial settings to learn novel instrumentation such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) have built upon their interdisciplinary approach as well.
Thumbnail26
Adquisición de Conocimientos a través de las Herramientas TIC para la Sustentabilidad de las PYMES
Dr. Jesús Salvador Vivanco Florido,  Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, México / Miembro del Cuerpo Académico Consolidado "Gestión de la Pequeña y Medina Empresa"

Abstract
El objetivo de la presente investigación es analizar el impacto  del uso de conocimientos a través de herramientas TIC, en el desempeño, desarrollo y sustenibilidad de las PYMES, y se considera que se puede utilizar la informática financiera colocada en la nube pública e incorporar la perspectiva de las pequeñas y medianas empresas PYME en el alcance de las redes sociales como un sistema de distribución de contenido de medios de comunicación y marketing;  en esta investigación se demuestra a través del análisis de la evidencia empírica estudiada, que el uso de herramientas TIC,  en la administración y operación de las PYMES mejora el desempeño, el desarrollo y la sostenibilidad de las PYMES.
Thumbnail27
Inclusión con TIC : Usabilidad de Colores para Pueblos Indígenas
Dra. Fátima Dolz de Moreno, Decana Facultad de Ciencias Puras y Naturales, Directora del Instituto de Investigaciones en Informática,  Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, Bolivia / Fundadora de Unidad de Postgrado de la Carrera de Informática

Abstract
Esta presenation está basada en un trabajo conjunto de la Dra. Fátima Consuelo Dolz y la  Lic. Elva Guaman Huallpa. En el mismo se plantea la incorporación de un modelo de uso de colores que sean utilizados en el diseño de interfaces de programas educativos para usuarios de áreas rurales indígenas, dentro de la etapa de Diseño Comunicacional de la Ingenieria de Software Educativo, tomando como base el diseño enfocado al usuario. Para llevar a cabo el propósito de la investigación se ha considerado: i) el uso del significado ancestral y la representación propia del color para las poblaciones indígenas, y ii) las preferencias o gustos del color de estas poblaciones. Para obtener esta información, se llevó a cabo una serie de encuestas a diferentes poblaciones del departamento de La Paz, Bolivia. El modelo se ha denominado Kurmi.
Thumbnail28
Posibilidades y Retos de Investigar desde la Síntesis: Relato de una Experiencia Investigativa
Dra. Ana María Miralles Castellanos, Grupo de investigación Synthesis, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Colombia

Abstract
Esta conferencia muestra qué pasa cuando en un proceso de investigación se hace necesario un desplazamiento epistemológico que no plantea el avance a partir de rupturas sino que camina desde la síntesis del conocimiento, en este caso representado en la Ciencia Social Computacional. Para ello se mostrará cómo investigando un tema típico de Ciencias Sociales como lo público, al hacerlo en el escenario de Twitter hizo que el proceso de investigación se moviera de la construcción de un objeto de estudio disciplinario, luego como lugar de paso a uno interdisciplinario, para llegar  finalmente a trabajarlo desde la síntesis del conocimiento.
Thumbnail29
Integración Implícita y Explícita entre Episteme (Conocimiento) y Doxa (Opinión) en Publicaciones Académicas
Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemics, USA / Ex-Decano de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela / Editor fundador en jefe del Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
Desde los griegos se ha venido diferenciando entre Epiteme (conocimiento, creencia justificada) y Doxa (opinión, creencia no justificada). Son conceptos muy diferentes pero difícilmente existe el uno sin el otro. Tienen en común “creencia”. A través de la cual se comunican. Ambas son especies del género “creencia”. Todo conocimiento es creencia pero no toda creencia es conocimiento.

Por otro lado, el proceso de la generación y comunicación del conocimiento está siempre apoyada en ambas nociones. ¿Qué es la revisión de pares si no la opinión de otros académicos en base a los conocimientos que tienen y a sus valores epistemológicos? ¿Están justificados esos valores? ¿O son creencias asumidas sin justificación? Si en la realidad académica no es posible separar Episteme de Doxa y más bien se requieren necesariamente la una a la otra ¿no debería aceptarse también en el contenido de los artículos a ser publicados?  ¿Se puede negar esa posibilidad (incluso deseabilidad) sin estar apoyándose en una interpretación subjetiva u opinión? De ser así, ¿no sería una contradictio in terminis y/o incoherencia en el pensamiento que produce esa conclusión? ¿Estamos seguros que no hay relación cibernética entre Epsiteme Doxa y esa relación no podría producir sinergias? ¿No habría también sinergias entre investigación y reflexión? ¿Entre conocimiento explicito e implícito? ¿Entre conocimiento y experiencia? ¿Entre investigación y consultoría? ¿Porqué no implementar explicita e intencionalmente relaciones cibernéticas entre  investigación y reflexión para formar un todo mayor que la suma de sus partes y con potenciales propiedades emergente de las que beneficiarían tanto la Episteme como la Doxa? Al fin y al cabo necesitamos de las dos en el contexto de una vida humana.