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Developing and Using Cybersecurity Discussion Case Studies (Participatory Workshop - Part 1 of 2)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.

Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:

Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.

Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Developing and Using Cybersecurity Discussion Case Studies (Participatory Workshop - Part 2 of 2)
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
The Case Method: The case method is an interactive teaching method that involves using a detailed description of a real world decision situation to stimulate an in-depth classroom discussion, typically lasting 75 to 90 minutes. The principal pedagogical objective of the approach, which was originally developed and refined at Harvard Business School, is to help students improve their judgment under conditions of considerable uncertainty and ambiguity. As such, the case studies developed to support these discussions rarely have a “right” answer and the actual outcome associated with a particular decision tends to be less important than the process through which the decision was reached.

Workshop Objectives: The workshop is intended to provide participants with an introductory look at the case method, with a particular emphasis on its application to cybersecurity situations. Topics to be covered will include:

Types of case studies and their application: The term “case study” means many things to different people. A framework for understanding the various types of case studies and their appropriate uses will be introduced.
Facilitating case discussions: Using cases as an instructional medium. Participants will be given the opportunity to engage in a discussion of an abbreviated case.
Developing discussion cases: The steps in the process of developing a discussion case will be examined, both from the case writer’s and organization’s perspective.
Publishing discussion cases: Outlets for publication of peer-reviewed discussion cases will be examined, as well as other outlets through which cases can be distributed. The existing collection of cybersecurity cases will be reviewed.

Acknowledgement: The materials developed for the workshop are being funded as part of a 2-year project that was funded by the Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) program of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF Award #1418711, “EDU: Developing Open Authentic Case Studies for a MS in Cybersecurity Capstone Course) specifically intended to develop case studies for use in a cybersecurity curriculum. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material provided or presented in the workshop are those of the facilitator(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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Teaching to Do: Integrating Professional, Consulting, and Research Experiences into the Classroom (Participatory Keynote Address)
Professor William Swart, College of Business, East Carolina University, USA / Former Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, East Carolina University, USA / Former Dean of Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract
Academics have long debated whether a university education should serve to provide a general foundation for life or to secure a livelihood. The former view was held for centuries during a time when education was dependent on one’s station in life. A member of the ruling class was taught to govern. Others could join a guild and learn a trade or work the land. The only other option was to join a religious order and be educated to serve God.

This view changed in the renaissance when members of the expanding middle class gained access to universities. Their expectations were to gain something more practical from attending a university. With the advent of the industrial revolution, universities became increasingly engaged in teaching skills that supported the industrial revolution – primarily mathematics, science and, later, engineering. Today, a university education is a de facto prerequisite to white collar employment.

The prevalent pedagogy has changed little since the middle ages. A professor standing in front of a classroom of students either reading or translating the contents of a book. Such a pedagogy serves to transfer knowledge, very much like reading a book on how to ride a bicycle might. However, when it comes to translating knowledge into practice, students and employers found that there was a huge difference between having the knowledge to, for example, ride a bicycle and being able to actually ride one successfully.

Closing the gap between knowledge and application has been a challenge for university programs designed to educate practitioners, such as engineering and business (not to speak of the health professions). The challenge arises from the dichotomy in the requirements for being a professor or a practitioner. To become a university professor, one must earn a PhD and engage in theoretical research that leads to grants and publications. To be a practitioner requires getting a job and develop one’s skills through years of practice. Having a PhD and teaching experience is not rewarded in industry, while industry experience is given very little value when applying for a job as a Professor.

Even when someone who has a PhD and has appropriate and relevant experience gained in industry, through consulting, and/or through applied research grants becomes a faculty member, the challenges of transferring that experience to students are more than meet the eyes. In this keynote address we will examine some of these challenges and explore how some of they might be overcome. We will discuss:
  • Textbooks – do they really reflect what I have experienced in the real world?
  • How do I package my experiences into learning modules?
  • How can I replicate the real world in a “real” classroom?
  • How do I avoid becoming a story teller and engage students in doing it, not just listening to it?
  • How do I instill team teamwork into learning – e.g. how do I change the role of student from being an individual competing for a grade to a team member assisting others to achieve a grade.
  • How do I become a coach and consultant to students as opposed to an authority figure that disseminated knowledge?
  • How do I gain acceptance for being a “different” kind of teacher?
Audience participation and discussion will be encouraged.
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Knowledge Communication and Peer Reviewing (Participatory Panel)
Co-Facilitators: Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education; and Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemic, USA / Former Dean of Research and Development of the University Simon Bolivar, Venezuela / Founding Editor in Chief of the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
In a survey of members of the Scientific Research Society, "only 8% agreed that 'peer review works well as it is'." (Chubin and Hackett, 1990, Peerless Science, Peer Review and U.S. Science Policy; State University of New York Press, p. 192). What has been done on this critical issue since 1990?

Chubin and Hackett (1990) resumed their findings as follows: "Today peer review is besieged on both practical and symbolic grounds. In their complaints, critics point to the operating characteristics of peer review: low level of consensus among reviewers, inconsistencies of judgment, errors of omission (when a flawed or fraudulent manuscript slips through) and commission (when a competitor's manuscript is blocked or delayed, or its results or arguments are stolen), the partisan flavor of reviewer comments (which seemingly violates principles of impartiality), and the unsettling influence of authors' characteristics on the fate of their manuscripts. These are neither a blueprint for selecting the best science nor an enactment of the values we hope science will honor" (p.122).

David Kaplan a highly cited author, stated briefly the problem at hand, saying that "Despite its importance as the ultimate gatekeeper of scientific publication and funding, peer review is known to engender bias, incompetence, excessive expense, ineffectiveness, and corruption. A surfeit of publications has documented the deficiencies of this system … and italics added] Yet so far, in spite of the teeth gnashing, nothing is being chewed…Investigation of the peer-review system has failed to provide validation for its use…In one study, previously published articles were altered to disguise their origin and resubmitted to the journals that had originally published the manuscripts…Most of these altered papers were not recognized and were rejected on supposed "scientific grounds." (How to Fix Peer Review, 1995, The Scientist, Vol. 19, Issue 1, Jun. 6. p. 10) [emphasis and italics added]. Kaplan’s suggested solution is an essential  part of the two-tier process implemented, since 2006, by the International Institute of Informatics and Systemics (IIIS) in its conferences and journals publications.

When Horrobin was editor of Prostaglandins and Medicine, and Medical Hypothesis titled his comments on the subject as "Peer Review: A Philosophically Faulty Concept which is Proving Disastrous for Science" [emphasis and italics added].  (The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 5, No. 2, June 1982, 1982, pp. 217-218).

When David Lazarus was Editor-in-Chief for the American Physical Society (which publishes The Physical Review, Physical Review Letters and Review of Modern Physics) asserted that "In only about 10-15% of cases do two referees agree on acceptance or rejection the first time around." [emphasis and italics added]. (Interreferee agreement and acceptance rates in physics, The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 5, No. 2, June 1982, p. 219) Lazarus added that "…the peer-reviewed system's being of finite value, particularly when used deceptively…We [in the Physical Review] rely on the honesty and integrity of our authors - and their own self-selection of the quality of the papers they send us - as much as on our referees and editors, to ensure the quality of our journals." [emphasis and italics added] In the same context, Hopps, in an article titled "Peer Review: A Trust, Not a Vault" asserts that the submission of spurious manuscripts to evaluate a journal-review process is an example of "violation of trust between journal and author." (Social Work, 34, p.3-4. Referenced in Speck, R. L.,1993, Publication Peer Review: An Annotated Bibliography) [emphasis and italics added]

Ziman, former editor of Science Progress, affirms that "The peer-review process seems not merely imperfect: It is an entirely useless, if not positively harmful activity, based upon quite erroneous assumptions." (Bias, incompetence, or bad management? The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 5, No. 2, June, pp.245-246) [emphasis and italics added]

Among the conclusions Weller (2002) made in her book, after analyzing more than 200 studies on peer reviewing in more than 300 journals, affirmed that "Peer review's outstanding weaknesses is that error of judgment, either unintentional or intentional, are sometimes made. Asking someone to volunteer personal time evaluating the work of another, possibly a competitor, by its very nature invites a host of potential problems, anywhere from holding a manuscript and not reviewing it to a careless review to fraudulent behavior." (Editorial Peer Review, its Strength and Weaknesses, 2002, p. 308).

This is why the International Institute of Informatics and Systemics (IIIS) initiated in 2005 a process combining Action-Research, Action-Learning and Action-Design in order to continuously improving its peer-review methodology. As a consequence, the IIIS have been continuously increasing the IIIS  effectiveness of peer-review. The following are example of scholars that have been participating in IIIS’s conferences for about ten years.

Dr. Jeremy Horne, President-emeritus of the Southwest Area Division, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA affirmed that “IIIS had conferences specifically devoted to the quality of the peer review process, and I discovered that there was a great tumult in academia over it. Editors of journals, such as Lancet[Horton, Richard (2000). "Genetically modified food: consternation, confusion, and crack-up". MJA 172 (4): 148–9. PMID 10772580.], scorned the quality of peer review, but in all the conferences with which I have been associated, not one ever devoted the much needed attention to improving it. The IIIS’ conference on Knowledge Generation and Communications Management (KGCM) did. If other organizations and conferences … devoted even 1/10 the attention as IIIS has, there surely would be more serious discussion meeting the concerns of about data manipulation, fraud, and other quality problems

Professor Grandon Gill, Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science, Editor of the Journal of IT Education and Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education,  affirmed that the IIIS developed “some of the most innovative peer review procedures that I have ever seen.”.

Now that Block Chain Technologies seems to have a high potential for definitely improving the effectiveness and the fairness of peer review, the IIIS scheduled this next conversational session to inter-share information and ideas regarding this issue. This participatory panel provides context and introduce the next conversational session.
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Implementing, Measuring, and Improving Blended Learning (Participatory Workshop)
Professor William Swart, College of Business, East Carolina University, USA / Former Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, East Carolina University, USA / Former Dean of Engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract
This workshop is about blended learning as a strategy to systematically and purposefully improve student learning. During the workshop, the knowledge accumulated during four years of hands-on experience in implementing this strategy in actual university classes will be shared.

In part 1 of the workshop, participants will learn to view blended learning in the context of Deming’s Plan, Do, Study, Act (P-D-S-A) cycle for achieving continual improvement of learning outcomes. The Plan step consists of developing the blended course syllabus, the DO step consists of teaching the blended course according to the syllabus, the Study step consists of measuring the results, and the Act step consists of incorporating improvements suggested by the measurements into the next syllabus.

In part 2 of the workshop, the considerations required to prepare a blended course syllabus will be discussed. These include the preparation for out of class learning materials, in class interactive group learning exercises, the configuration of the learning space, the changed roles of instructor and students, and assessment materials that are consistent with blended learning.

In part 3 of the workshop, some of the unanticipated issues associated with day to day delivery of blended learning, both inside and outside of the classroom, will be discussed. These include student and team satisfaction, group issues such as size and composition, as well dealing with students who are less eager to engage and learn.

In part 4 of the workshop, techniques used to measure student outcomes will be presented. These measures are based on Dr. Michael G. Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance and are designed to identify and measure obstacles that students encountered to their active engagement with the blended learning environment. Examples will be given on how the measurements can be used to identify improvements to the syllabus that could reduce these obstacles when the course is taught again.

In part 5 of the workshop, the interpretation of information received from subsequent cycles will be discussed. Participants will learn to distinguish between continuous and continual improvement and to identify the Transactional Distance factors that are significant predictors of student satisfaction (which in turn measure outcomes). This provides valuable information as to where to focus future improvement efforts.

The workshop will conclude with an open discussion of issues associated with blended learning encountered by participants.
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The Impact of Social Rank on Saliva Cortisol, Testosterone in Relations to Prosocial Behavior in Humans
Professor Bernard Wallner, Department of Anthropology and Department of Behavioral Biology, University of Vienna, Austria

Abstract
Christopher Boehm argues human social rank has evolved in the rain forest. In such an environment, our human-like ancestors may have developed egalitarian communities comparable to recent indigenous populations.

However, in the course of human evolution, social systems have changed in relation to population growth from small egalitarian groups to chiefdoms tribes and recent large-scale populations living in democratic or autocratic states. Parallel to the development of divers' human social systems prosocial behaviors such as cooperation, empathy, or coalition-forming became typical human traits of interactions. Sharing these behaviors caused social cohesion within groups resulting in better individual reproductive success. Due to that, a game theoretic approach has contributed to a better understanding of these behaviors in relation to human evolution. The universality of prosocial behaviors may underline the assumption that it origins from an evolutionary development. Irrespective of different societies or ecological adaptation, all human social communities do share the same characteristics of cooperative behaviors, namely altruism, direct and indirect reciprocity and punishment of free riders who do not reciprocate prosocial behavior. However, most studies do not consider the social rank positions between prosocial interacting individuals. For example, cooperative behavior between individuals of different rank positions is common in the academic field or between employees in companies. According to our evolutionary heritage this presentation will highlight the effects social rank on cooperation or fairness but also on its defection in relation to stress physiology.
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Effective Teaching and/or Accelerated Learning through Piaget & Popper's Constructivism, when using Mental Structures, and Critical Thinking
Prof. Matthew E. Edwards, Professor of Physics, Alabama A&M University, USA / Former Dean, School of Arts and Sciences, Alabama A&M University, USA

Abstract
Engaging students, to teach them new concepts, is the primary goal of college education, yet achieving this goal in the sciences and engineering is often a formidable task for teachers and their students. We have developed a practice that achieves this goal through constructivism and critical thinking, which requires the integration of in-depth knowledge of a topic, an adequate delivery/receiving method for what is being taught or learned, and the development of mental structures to retain better newly acquired knowledge. As strong advocates of Piaget and Popper’s Constructivism, we observe that the model gives a basis for understanding the intellectual acquisition of new knowledge and its distribution through effective teaching. In this regard, the onset of cognitive thinking and learning begins with recording, valuing, comparing, and contrasting events, or situations. We have found that once mental structures as developed in the mind are incorporated or used by instructors, the instructors’ teaching is enhanced, or when used by students in the learning process, their critical thinking is expanded, even when only one or sequentially new concepts are being taught. To that extent, we have developed mnemonics, acronyms, and other mental patterns of the mind, called “mental hooks,” “mental straights” and “mental S’s” to assist instructors in teaching or students in learning. Moreover, we have made the connection between how effective teaching is enhanced from the integration of critical thinking, an adequate delivery method, and mental structures. Both early career instructors and students, desiring to achieve effective teaching or learning, respectively, can benefit from these aspects of Piaget and Popper’s Constructivism and methods of critical thinking.
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Lifelong Learning and Education
Professor Alfredo Soeiro, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Porto, Portugal / Former Pro-Rector of University of Porto, Portugal

Abstract
Lifelong Learning is the "ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated" pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons. Education is the process of facilitating learning. Schools at all levels have been contributing to LLL procedures. Most universities and other schools have been developing activities beyond educating young students and researching towards providing training and education for all. Universities and other education institutions have been addressing the use of materials online in digital format. One movement is recently the MOOCs (Massive Online Open Courses) that create free access to courses in most areas of knowledge are an effective tool to reach LLL for all.
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Designing for and with Communities: Transdisciplinarity, Co-Creation and Dialogue
Professor Jan Detand, Industrial Engineering design at Industrial Design Center, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Belgium

Abstract
Design has, since its advent in the early 20th century, evolved from a “product” perspective (constructivism), to a “design process” perspective (design thinking) and is now entering a new era that uses systemic design methods to solve complex societal “wicked problems”. Instead of designing artifacts (products) for the benefit of individual end-users, today’s design challenges are more and more shifting towards designing for communities, thus empowering people to find useful answers to the global sustainable development goals of the United Nations.

At Ghent University, designing for and with communities is a novel design method that is based on transdisciplinarity, co-creation and dialogue. It actively brings multiple stakeholders – experts from different specialties, designers and end-user communities – together in an iterative, collaborative change process (using methods of co-creation). Prototyping real-life experiences in a living space play a central role as integration and communication method throughout the development cycle. During every iteration, a “co-experience” is obtained through dialogues, and direct interactions with the prototype(s) in a “real local” context. The co-experienced thoughts, insights and opinions are shared to a “global” community. This design process gradually reveals affordances and disturbances by iterative adaptations.
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The Need for Standards and Integration in Education Informatics
Professor Sami Shaban, Medical Education Department, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, UAE

Abstract
In the last few decades, many education systems have been developed to help manage the educational process and deliver teaching and learning using IT methods which help with better retention of the learning material. There are several broad areas for education systems such as Curriculum, Assessment, Grades, Evaluations, and Teaching & Learning Enhancing Systems. So far, private companies have developed these systems in isolation and most use proprietary or locked databases which don't allow access by other systems. The need for integration, data exchange and inter-operability is growing as duplication of data causes several problems such as manual data entry into multiple system which is error prone and slow and manual importing & exporting of data from one system to another. These can result in mismatching of data and outdated data in some of the system among other problems.

I present the current status of education informatics in educational institutions which have gone the route of in-house developed education systems, my institution being one of these. This has happened mainly due to the lack of integration between existing education systems available in the market. It is also due to missing needed features and lack of the ability to customize the systems in some cases. I also present an example success story in integration of systems in the Health Informatics field which, several decades ago, set standards for storage, coding and transfer of data which forced software developers to develop systems using these standards and allowed for inter-operability between these systems. There is a similar need for such standards in the education informatics field to allow for similar data exchange and inter-operability between education systems in the market.
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Interdisciplinary High-Tech Programs: Educated Ignoramus or Learned Professional Yield
Professor Ran Giladi, Department of Communication Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

Abstract
Following several decades of academic and industrial experience in Computer related Science and Engineering, a top-down perspective of interdisciplinary engineering programs is presented, with an emphasis on Communication Systems Engineering. Various stakeholders' criteria for the program evaluation are presented, and questions regarding the yield and future of such programs are discussed. The key question in this discussion is whether Communication System Engineering, or other interdisciplinary computer related programs for this matter, are "horizontal" or "vertical", professions or specializations. Some insights of how to improve these interdisciplinary programs are offered.
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The Notion of Global Data Fusion and its Application to Cyber Security
Dr. Mario Lamanna, Evoelectronics, Italy; Selex-SI, USA

Abstract
Abstract: Global data fusion is one of the main technologies used in complex systems. The development of advanced architectures based on an interdisciplinary design approach based on global data fusion gives considerable advantages in many applications. This paper analyses an advanced cyber security architecture and explores the capability of this architecture to include global data fusion. The effects of the application of global data fusion techniques are then analysed and the consequent improvements in the network security of critical infrastructures are described and quantified.
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Research on Social Media Writing and Search Behavior Sociophysics Approach
Professor Akira Ishii, Department of Applied Mathematics and Physics, Tottori University, Japan; and Drs. Nozomi Okano, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Applied Mathematics and Physics, Tottori University, Japan

Abstract
People search on the Internet for matters of interest, and further post their opinions and impressions, support for other people's opinions, criticisms, etc. on social media. The behavior of such people is recorded on the Internet, and its record can be analyzed as data. We analyzed the mathematical model of hit phenomenon analyzing people's posting behavior to social media and the two theories of social physics such as mathematical model of retrieval behavior to analyze retrieval behavior. I will tell you that you can analyze entertainment, topics with seasonality, trends and so on.
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Cross Cultural Seminar Inspires Multidisciplinary Learning: from Biomedical Engineering to Gerontechnology
Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto, Councilor and Dean, Former Associate to the President, Faculty of Engineering, Kogakuin University, Japan

Abstract
The term of "Gerontechnology" is used as an interdisciplinary field combining gerontology and technology. Gerontology is picked up in the aging society in the world. In Japan, for example, the generation balance will change in a few years. A variety of technology, on the other hand, will help the ageing society, including assistive technology.

In "Biomedical Engineering", the human being is analyzed by the engineering methodology, and the engineered design is applied to the human being. Between the engineered system and biological system, the interface has been studied and the collaborative system has been designed. You can find out the same base of philosophy between "Biomedical Engineering" and "Gerontechnology".

The effectiveness of the cross cultural seminar on multidisciplinary learning has been discussed in relation to "Biomedical Engineering" and "Gerontechnology". Several multidisciplinary learning programs have been practiced in the biomedical engineering field: in Japan, in Thailand, and in USA. Some of them are cross-cultural student-seminars. They have learned how to communicate with students, who have a variety of studying backgrounds and a variety of cultural backgrounds. The training awakes students to several points: thinking from a different point of view, and using various communication tools. The process extends the communication skill, and helps cross-cultural understandings, and compensate the gap of generation.
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Implanted Electronics, making the Blind See Again
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Albrecht Rothermel, Deputy Director of the Institute of Microelectronics, Ulm University, Germany / Former editor of the IEEE JSSC, and TPC-Chair of the IEEE ICCE-B

Abstract
Since 2006 Dr. Rothermel is working in a German consortium, designing microelectronics for retinal implants, which are sometimes also called bionic eyes. He will give a short overview of the concepts which are pursued around the world, and after that he will detail the German approach of subretinal stimulation. With the first chips from his lab being in patients since 2014, a significant improvement in implant lifetime could be achieved. Some characteristics of the device from circuit to system level will be detailed together with the surgery procedure.
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Can We Force the Producers of Food Supplements to Adhere to the Findings of Scientific Studies? Personal Experiences
Professor Dov Lichtenberg, Former Dean of Medicine, Professor Emeritus , since 2011, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Abstract
The echo of scientific findings in the general media and in the general public varies from no response to unjustified optimisms. To understand the trends requires knowledge in several disciplines, from chemistry, life sciences and basic medical sciences to Psychology and Economics. In my lecture, I will tell you about some of my experiences with the echo to my publications and discuss with you the outcome.

Back in 1974, I came back to the medical school in Jerusalem after a 2year Post Doc at Caltech, where I studied phospholipid vesicles as models of biomembranes. Because I came to a department of pharmacology, it was "natural" to try to use these nano particles to deliver drugs and the first drug we used was Insulin entrapped in vesicles (liposomes). PerOs Application of this preparation failed so we tried rectal application. The outcome of this work appeared in the Jerusalem Post under the title "New hope to diabetic patients". In 2004, two papers appeared under the title "Vitamin E supplementation results in early death". This resulted in attack against the authors for heterogeneity of the participants, for choosing the end point and for the result being unreasonable. We conducted a meta-analysis planned such that the criticism were answered and got the same result. How did the producers of vitamin E responded?  How did it affect sales? For how long?

Ten years ago, we found that Curcumin (turmeric) synergistically promotes the inhibition of cancer cells by Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) the latter enzyme plays a central role in the development of colorectal cancer. We therefore suggested that the synergistic effect may become clinically important because it can be achieved in the Serum of patients receiving standard, non-toxic anti-inflammatory or antineoplastic dosages of celecoxib. Did anyone benefit from this finding?

Recently, we conducted a meta-analysis on the cardiovascular benefits of indiscriminate supplementation of Omega-3 capsules. The results, expressed in terms of quality adjusted life years (QALY), were that in people receiving no statins, omega-3 supplementation results in an 8% decrease of the risk of cardiac death, whereas statin-treated people are hardly affected by omega-3 supplementation. This result, based on a Markov model and Monte-Carlo simulations, are intuitively understood by the general public and can therefore be the basis for the (personal) decision on whether to take Omega-3 supplements. As could have been expected, only a few newspapers related to this findings.

In the last 25 years, much of our time was devoted to different aspects of lipid peroxidation. Several oxidatively-modified lipids in membranes and in plasma lipoproteins affect both the normal function and the OS-associated pathological conditions, including lipid dyslipidemia factors antioxidants. We have developed colorimetric methods to study the kinetics of peroxidation and studied basic aspects of the mechanisms involved in lipid oxidation, using both lipoproteins and liposomal model systems. Recently we have been studied possibilities of quantitating OS, using the available data on the OS, as determined by the steady state concentrations of different biomarkers. Preliminary results support the conclusion of our previous study (Dotan et al, 2004) that there are several types of OS. Much of our current effort is devoted to a search for the different types and their role in different pathologies.
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The Technology of Cardboard - From a Zero Budget Canvas to VR and Nintendo's Labo Project
Ashley Dean, MA, Leeds Beckett University, United Kingdom

Abstract
For almost 2000 years, Paper has been a key component in the advancement of societies across the globe. But where as the act of writing is becoming an increasingly digital process, the physical form of Paper (and it's more robust cousin Cardboard), is being used in some surprising new ways.

In this presentation I will discuss my own relationship with Cardboard, highlight some of the innovative ways it is being used today and look ahead to some future applications.
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How to Measure the Unmeasurable – the Nature of Composite Indices and their Application in Educational Research
Dr. Pawel Poszytek, General Director, Foundation for the Development of the Education System, Poland / Member of working groups of the European Commission and the Ministry of National Education of Poland.

Abstract
The present world is flooded by various kinds of indices. They aim at describing the reality, however rarely do we discuss about the limitations they pose. On the one hand, composite indicators by their nature:

• can summarise complex or multi-dimensional issues in view of supporting decision-makers
• are easier to interpret than trying to find a trend in many separate indicators
• facilitate the task of ranking countries on complex issues in a benchmarking exercise
• can assess progress of countries over time on complex issues
• reduce the size of a set of indicators or include more information within the existing size limit
• place issues of country performance and progress at the centre of the policy arena
• facilitate communication with general public (i.e. citizens, media, etc.) and promote accountability.

On the other hand, they can lead to creating misleading policy messages and simplistic policy conclusions, disguising serious failings and leading to inappropriate policies, misuse, and political influence. How to avoid these threats? The author will give two examples of educational research projects where these obstacles have been encountered and surmounted.
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Improving Interfaces Design by Involving Users
Dr. Sylvia Mirry, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy / Former visiting researcher at University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract
Involving users in design and creation processes of computational artifacts is at the basis of many HCI methodologies and it is emerging as a crucial activity for those initiatives that aim to co-creation and open innovation. The user is playing a role that is becoming more active, being the main character in several steps of the most commonly used approaches for the development and release of applications and tools, in particular in those initiatives of open innovation and co-creation. In these contexts, many HCI methodologies can be adopted, with a different level of users' involvement. Several questions and considerations arise: Is users' satisfaction proportional to real users' engagement in the design process of an application? Which methodology has to be applied so as to obtain an interface that better meet users' expectation? We will discuss about the results we have obtained in different projects where the main role has been played the Users.
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A General Educational Framework for Decision-Making and Problem-Solving
Professor Ariyoshi Kusumi, School of International Liberal Studies, Chukyo University, Japan / Visiting Scientist at The Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe in Hungary

Abstract
I will discuss a general educational methodology for critical thinking and problem solving, and I will propose a systematic educational framework for judging ability. The educational methodology has five steps, which are:

1. designing alternatives to judge between/among them,
2. listing potential perspectives for the judging alternatives,
3. organizing and categorizing potential perspectives into a minimum amount of perspectives,
4. judging (selecting an alternative) from each perspective, and
5. comprehensive judging (selecting an alternative). For simple problems.

Applying this framework is easy. For complicated problems, these steps could work like a  manual o gudielines to make teaching material for teachers.
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Solar Induction Climate Driver and Much More: An Interdisciplinary Forecasting Approach
Bruce Leybourne, MS, Research Director and Principal Investigator, Institute for Advance Studies on Climate Change (IASCC), USA / Former Navy tenure at the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office, NASA's Stennis Space Center

Abstract
Simple step down energy induction occurs between sun and earth, much like the transformer process that steps down your household energy from higher voltage transmission lines sourced from the power company. The sun would represent a large coil from the power company, while the earth represents the smaller coil or your home. The larger coil element generally excites current into the smaller coil element by induction to step the energy down. Solar coronal holes that are aligned with the sun’s north-south axis are considered Axial Induction elements, while those aligned with the equator are considered Radial Induction elements. Most coronal holes configurations represent some combination of the Axial and Radial elements. These dark coronal holes on the sun represent the induction current elements of our Solar Stellar Transformer, charging/discharging the sun and thereby the solar system including Earth, within an Electric Universe model [1]. In space above the earth’s poles there are aurora plasma rings, inducing ground currents within the mid-ocean ridges, especially the mid-ocean ridge encircling the South Pole (Radial Induction). A direct coupling with the Earth’s most powerful induction current elements occurs within its mantle and inner/outer core. Mantle circuit trends can be mapped with satellite mantle gravity imaging of the thermal signatures given off by induction current elements of the mid-ocean ridge circuits. Complex magnetic modeling techniques reveal multi-phase circuit configurations of the Polar Regions. The induction characteristics are determined by current alignments between layers in the Earth and polarity relationships between of the Earth, Sun and other planets. The alignment and polarity determine the attraction or repulsive forces in plasma physics and determine charging and discharging forces on our planet. For example, circuit activation and switching of these global scale electric circuits mapped by satellite gravity and magnetics signatures can be understood in terms of shifting earthquake and lightning hotspot activity. The Southeast Indian Ridge mantle circuit provides South Pole grounding links to lighting activity in the African Congo. A shift in lightning from the African Congo to Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela signals a change of Earth’s charging phase to the East Pacific Rise. This is the Earth’s largest ridge and a most active mantle circuit linked to earthquakes, volcanic activity and huge climate change [2]. An Interdisciplinary Forecasting approach using an innovative electro-dynamic model of our solar system can be built with Geophysical Intelligence. This builds a comprehensive framework for understanding Earth’s interactions with space weather. Stellar Transformer concepts can be implemented with an improved understanding of common electromagnetic denominators associated with space weather hazards (Electro-Magnetic Pulse, EMP), communications, general every day and extreme weather events, i.e. hurricanes, tornadoes associated with the variable frequencies of climate change, earthquakes, volcanoes, and certain types of wildfire outbreaks associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CME’s). For this purpose, development of data visualization tools to extract and add Geophysical Intelligence from a multitude of environmental data is valuable for forecasting natural disaster events of many types.

Keywords: Interdisciplinary Forecasting, Electric Universe, Stellar Transformer, Geophysical Intelligence, Space Weather, Lightning Hotspot, Mantle Circuits, Axial-Radial Induction, Gravity, Magnetics, Climate Change, Earthquake, Volcano, and Wildfire

Electric Universe Stellar Transformer Video Links:
[1] https://www.iascc.org/free-stuff     &    http://ievpc.org/about-us.html
Reference to Breakout Session at Conference:
[2] Leybourne, B.A., Hurricane Irma 2017:  Relationships with Lightning, Gravity, and Earthquakes, The 12th International Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Orlando (IMSCI), FL., (July 08 - 11) 2018.
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A New Approach to Training and Software: Good Instruction vs. Good Software
Dr. Russell Jay Hendel, Department of Mathematics, Towson University, USA

Abstract
In this computer age, CAS, Computer Assisted Software, is common, available, and used in both University teaching and Industry Training. The purpose of this talk is to address a new approach to assessing CAS usefulness. The typical approach, both in the University and Industry settings is, "Does it work?" "What are the 'before and after' scores and are they significant?" This approach is flawed for three reasons: I) INSTRUCTION vs. SOFTWARE: We already have a rich literature on good instruction that is supported by before-after analysis. This instructional literature should be both sufficient and necessary to evaluate software. II) SOFTWARE OMISSIONS: If the software is lacking an important instructional feature the current attitude is to wait for the next software version before implementing; contrastively, we advocate concurrent supplementation of the software with necessary instructional aids. III) CONTRADICTORY STATISTICAL RESULTS: The over-emphasis on software necessarily leads to contradictory statistical results on efficacy since the important driver of instructional methodology is typically lacking from the experiments. As time permits, examples are given from several disciplines using the four pillars of good instructional pedagogy advocated by Hendel in a recent book.
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Enterprise Delegation
Dr. Kevin Foltz, Information Technology and Systems Division, Institute for Defense Analyses, USA / Independent Technical Analyst for the Department of Defense, USA

Abstract
Delegation is a key to good leadership. It is also something non-leaders do every day to get things done. This talk looks at some of the ways we commonly use delegation and how to use delegation in a more structured way in a business environment. The goal is to make delegation more formal, traceable, and verifiable so that it can be used as an integrated part of normal business.
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From Whom to Source Information in a Complex World
Professor T. Grandon Gill, Director of the Doctorate in Business Administration, College of Business, University of South Florida, USA / Editor-in-Chief of Informing Science / Editor of the Journal of IT Education / Founding Editor of Journal of Information Technology Education

Abstract
From whom should a client seek information? In a very simple environment, one where questions typically have a single "correct" answer that does not change much over time and facts are not in dispute, it may not matter very much. Whether information is acquired from an instructor, a textbook, an online source or from acquaintances, it may amount to the same thing. In a complex environment—where many plausible solutions to a problem can co-exist, where context is critical and ever-changing and where alternative information sources each have their own agenda—the question becomes much more difficult to answer.

The presentation introduces an exploratory framework that considers how different types of complex environments may lead an individual or organization to seek out alternative sources of information. It begins with a brief overview of extrinsic complexity, a form of complexity closely related to the notion of a fitness landscape from evolutionary biology. It then summarizes the challenges presented when informing takes place in high complexity environments. Three dimensions for classifying such environments—survivability, maturity and focus—are then proposed. Potential informing sources are also classified based upon the role they play in the environment relative to a potential client. Finally, a prescriptive model is developed that proposes how these alternative informing sources may be prioritized based upon the client's environment.
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Information Security Awareness
Professor Margit Scholl, Faculty of Economics, Computer Science, Law Business and Administrative Informatics, Technical University of Wildau [FH], Germany

Abstract
The digital transformation taking place in society and changes society behavior. The very interesting technical developments must be understood and designed in a user-friendly and user-acceptable way. In the sense of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of the European Union (EU) there must exist an information security (IS) for the use of mobile devices and services, in particular IS in design or IS in default. Nevertheless, the thus connected and simultaneously embracing hazards of abuse and organized crime must be prevented. Information security awareness (ISA) is a necessary response to the chal-lenges ahead.

IS and awareness must be an integrated part of these agendas. The goal of IS is to protect information of all types and origins. Here, the employees play a significant role in the success of IS, and the entire staff of an institution need to know about their specific roles and be aware of the information security management system (ISMS). However, we all tend to have an insufficient knowledge of the risks involved, of IS, and of the GDPR; this is compounded by carelessness in handling data and insufficient ISA. As there are still fundamental strategic deficiencies in the institutions themselves, humans should not be called “the weakest link” in the security chain. Backed by a clear conceptual approach, information security awareness trainings (ISAT) are essential for everyone. However, clas-sical trainings are not currently working very well.

Psychologically based research shows that a systemic approach might be helpful. This is where analogue game-based learning (GBL) comes into play. Psychological studies show the great importance of emotionalizing when communicating IS knowledge and the reliable exchange of experience about IS. However, in many institutions a change in (business/ad-ministration) culture is becoming necessary. IS must be integrated into all (business) pro-cesses and projects, and viable safeguards must be included. In the digital age every em-ployee should be aware of and competent in IS.

Game-based learning receives increasing recognition as an effective teaching and learning method for promoting motivation and inducing behavioral changes because simulation games enable active and experience-oriented learning by trial and error, repetition, team work and communication. They offer immediate feedback regarding the learning progress and are oriented towards the learners, their level of knowledge and their needs (learner-centered approach). A new integration of analog serious games and different learning methods, called awareness training 3.0, is needed integrating knowledge transfer, emo-tionality and team-based applications. This methodical triad is needed for the sensitization for information security. While an analog game version increases the understanding of the IS concept after playing the game, digital game versions engaged the individuals through voluntary repetition and therefore substantially reinforce the information learned earlier.

The keynote summarizes the most important scientific findings, transfers them to the prac-tice of IS trainings and shows examples.
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Bug In Ear Device: Review of Literature and Potential Methodological Innovations
Professor Cécile Gardies, National Higher School of Agricultural Education Training, France / Director of the IDC Collection (Information-Documentation-Communication) to the Cépadues Editions / Co-director of the Agora Collection Research Editions Educagri; and Professor Laurent Fauré, Head of Education and Pedagogy Department, National Higher School of Agricultural Education Training, France

Abstract
The BIE (Bug In Ear) coaching (Rock et al., 2009) has been set up, tested and analyzed in work published in the world. We examine research based on technologies used to supervise real-time teaching practices. This review is based on mobile technologies we conducted in France on a "real-time regulation" method, some of the results of which will be presented. So, based on a review of literature published on support methods in different countries, we will explore the methods to reduce the physical distance between the trainee and the trainer and conditions in which these technologies would be efficient like the development of empowered to act, professional development, evaluation of practices, formatives feedbacks used in training situations.
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Interdisciplinary Studies: a Break Through or There Is No New Thing under The Sun?
Professor Redkin Oleg I., Faculty of African and Asian Studies, Head of Arabic Studies, Saint Petersburg State University, Russia; and Professor Olga Bernikova, Research Laboratory for Analysis and Modeling of Social Process, Saint Petersburg State University, Russia

Abstract
The modern stage of the development of science shows that the most impressive discoveries occur on the borders of various fields of studies, for example, physics and biology, mathematics and philology, etc. The history of science shows that interdisciplinarity has been one of the main conditions of successful research work. The presentation regards interdisciplinarity in historical perspective. Multifaceted scholar activities are considered to be the hallmark of the ancient times. It seems that the history repeats and now we are witnessing reflection of the past but on a new stage of social development. The illustrative example of this practice are researches carried on at St. Petersburg State University.
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Technology-Based Learning: ‘High-Tech’ and ‘High-Engagement’
Dr. Jyothi Thalluri, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Australia

Abstract
Not provided by the presenter.
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Modelos Pedagógicos Emergentes en Ambientes Virtuales de Aprendizaje
Professor Gabriela Vilanova and Professor Jorge Varas, Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Argentina

Abstract
Una de las consecuencias más importantes de la sociedad del conocimiento es la transformación de los espacios y lugares para el aprendizaje. Las pedagogías que emergen deben posibilitar la eliminación de los muros del conocimiento dotando a las personas de la capacidad suficiente para enfrentarse a un aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida. Los procesos educacionales han sido modificados para adaptarse a las actuales condiciones y necesidad de la sociedad del siglo XXI. Las pedagogías emergentes surgen en los contextos de la sociedad del conocimiento en red. Se basan en la integración de las tecnologías digitales, la exploración y la modificación de las pedagogías existentes y desarrollan nuevas propuestas teóricas y prácticas. Muchos de los aspectos asociados a la evolución de los entornos virtuales de enseñanza-aprendizaje podemos situarlos en la zona de tensión entre la tradición didáctica, de donde podemos lograr sus fundamentos, y la necesidad de adaptarse a la actualidad, lo que supone incorporar cambios metodológicos, en algunos casos, condicionados por las características tecnológicas de los ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje donde se desarrolla el proceso didáctico.
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Simulación de Conducción con Monitorización del Conductor para Formación en Técnicas de Conducción Segura y Eficiente
Professor David González Ortega, Departamento de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e Ingeniería Telemática, Universidad de Valladolid, España

Abstract
Los simuladores de conducción se están utilizando cada vez más tanto para el aprendizaje de conductores en formación como para investigaciones de distinta índole, generando relaciones sinérgicas entre las dos áreas. En esta ponencia, se presenta un simulador de conducción inmersivo con una variedad de escenarios, situaciones de tráfico y modelos de vehículos, además de una monitorización del estado del conductor. Se integra en el simulador un módulo para el almacenamiento de los datos de las simulaciones en un servidor remoto y una plataforma web para la gestión, clasificación y análisis de los datos en función de diferentes criterios, posibilitando el seguimiento en la evolución del desempeño de un conductor o la comparación entre ellos.
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La Efectividad de Revisión por Pares (Peer Review):¿Es Posible Subirla?
Dr. Nagib Callaos, President of the International Institute of Informatics and Systemics, USA / Ex-Decano de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Venezuela / Editor fundador en jefe del Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics.

Abstract
El objetivo de esta ponencia es: 1) presentar de nuevo lo ya conocido desde,  al menos, el año 1982, 2) alertar sobre este grave problema que está haciendo más daño en los países en vías de desarrollo, y 3) sugerir potenciales soluciones.

Lazarus (1982), editor-en-Jefe de la American Physical Society, enfatizó que “el sistema de peer reviewing es de valor finito especialmente cuando se usa para engañar….nosotros, el Physical Review, no basamos en la honestidad y la integridad de nuestros autores, y de su propia auto-selección de la calidad de los artículos que nos envían (The American Physical Society publishes The Physical Review, Physical Review Letters and Review of Modern Physics, (p. 219) ref.  (Baez, J., 2004, The Bogdanoff Affair. http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/bogdanov.html)

En una encuesta hecha entre los miembros de la Scientific Research Society se encontró que sólo el 8% estaban de acuerdo que el peer reviewing opera bien en la forma como se viene haciendo (Chubin and Hackett , 1990, Peerless Science, Peer Review and U.S. Science Policy; NY, State University of  NY  Press.).

Entre las conclusiones que hace Weller (2001, Editorial Peer Review, its Strength and Weaknesses, Medford, New Jersey) en su libro, después de estudiar mas de 200 estudios sobre peer reviewing basados en mas de 300 revistas, afirma que las debilidades del peer reviewing son causadas por un errores de juicio que se hacen, sea intencional o inintencionalmente. Preguntar a alguien que sea voluntario para evaluar el trabajo de otro, posiblemente un competidor, por su misma naturaleza, se presta a potenciales problemas, desde la retención de un manuscrito y su no revisión hasta una revisión descuidada o comportamiento fraudulento.

En Julio del 2014 Springer Verlag y IEEE tuvieron que retirar todas las memorias que contenían 120 artículos generados al azar por un programa, después de haberlos 1) revisado por pares, 2) aceptado y 3) publicado.

¿Se ha hecho algo significativos en los 32 años que pasaron desde que Lazarus alarmó al mundo académico sobre el engaño que hay en la revisión por pares y de la carencia de valor de los procesos revisión por pares en cuanto a resolver el problema?  Es realmente sorprendente que no se hagan adecuadas investigaciones al respecto.